ASCLS eNewsBytes
Jul. 8, 2014

SHEA, APIC and others develop new guidelines to combat MRSA in hospitals
Becker's Hospital Review
New guidelines, published in the July issue of Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, aim at reducing the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and prioritize current prevention efforts underway in hospitals. The strategies were developed in a collaborative effort led by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America, Infectious Diseases Society of America, American Hospital Association, Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology and The Joint Commission.More

Researchers regrow corneas using adult human stem cells
Fox News
Boston researchers have successfully regrown human corneal tissue — a feat that could potentially restore vision in the blind. The achievement also marks one of the first times that scientists have constructed tissue using adult-derived human stem cells.More

Researchers: Genetic link to autism known as CHD8 mutation found
University of Washington via Medical Xpress
In a collaboration involving 13 institutions around the world, researchers have broken new ground in understanding what causes autism. The results were published in Cell magazine July 3 in a report titled "Disruptive CHD8 Mutations Define a Subtype of Autism in Early Development." "We finally got a clear-cut case of an autism-specific gene," said Raphael Bernier, the lead author.More

Science journal retracts paper on stem cell discovery
USA Today
The scientific journal Nature retracted two stem cell papers that received national attention when they were published in January. The paper by researchers from Harvard University and Japan's RIKEN Institute described a new method of producing versatile stem cells without altering their DNA — a process that promised to make it easier to use stem cells in research and treatment.More

Study: Fruit fly genome reveals complexity of RNA and provides a model for studying mechanisms for hereditary diseases in humans
DARK Daily
Scientists have teased another level of information out of the genome. This time, the new insights were developed from studies of the fruit fly's transcriptome. This knowledge will give pathologists another channel of information that may be useful in developing assays to support more precise diagnosis and therapeutic decisions. More

Target for cancer therapy protects cell identity
Health Canal
All of our cells contain an identical genetic code, but the code is expressed differently in the 220 cell types of our body. This equips each cell type with a unique identity, which is crucial for the cells to maintain throughout life. Researchers at the Biotech Research and Innovation Centre at the University of Copenhagen have elucidated an important mechanism that protects cell identity and challenge a paradigm in biological research.More

Important piece in brain tumor puzzle found by scientists
McGill University via ScienceDaily
A member of the protein family known as SUMO — small ubiquitin like modifier — is a key to why tumor cells multiply uncontrollably, especially in the case of glioblastoma, scientists have discovered. Glioblastoma is the most common and lethal brain cancer. Current standard treatments include surgical resection, adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. More

Mechanism that prevents lethal bacteria from causing invasive disease is revealed
Infection Control Today
An important development in understanding how the bacterium that causes pneumonia, meningitis and septicemia remains harmlessly in the nose and throat has been discovered at the University of Liverpool's Institute of Infection and Global Health. Streptococcus pneumoniae is a commensal which can live harmlessly in the nasopharynx as part of the body's natural bacterial flora. More

New research sheds light on the genetic secrets of deadly algae
University of Technology, Sydney via Phys.org
University of Technology, Sydney research into the genetic makeup of often harmful algae is increasing our understanding of how marine biotoxins can damage global seafood industries and human health. Despite marine organisms fueling our fisheries, driving chemical and nutrient cycles and producing 50 percent of our oxygen, their genetic code remains largely unmapped.More

SHEA, APIC and others develop new guidelines to combat MRSA in hospitals
Becker's Hospital Review
New guidelines, published in the July issue of Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, aim at reducing the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and prioritize current prevention efforts underway in hospitals.More

Scientists: Bacteria can evolve biological timer to survive antibiotics
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem via ScienceDaily
When exposed to repeated cycles of antibiotics, bacteria can evolve a new adaptation by remaining dormant for the treatment period to survive antibiotic stress. The results show for the first time that bacteria can develop a biological timer to survive antibiotic exposure.More

Multiple protocol breaches behind anthrax exposure at US federal labs
Reuters
The safety breach at a government lab that may have exposed 84 workers to live anthrax centered on a pivotal lapse in procedure: Researchers working with the bacteria waited 24 hours to be sure they had killed the pathogens, half the time required by a new scientific protocol. More

Potential new treatment for aggressive breast cancer
Medical News Today
Researchers have discovered a "viable" new target for the treatment of a particularly aggressive form of breast cancer. The molecule, known as alpha-v-beta-6, could also be used to identify those women with HER2-positive breast cancer who have a higher risk of developing secondary tumors.More