ASCLS eNewsBytes
Sep. 16, 2014

Scientists 'reset' stem cells to study start of human development
Reuters
British and Japanese scientists have managed to "reset" human stem cells to their earliest state, opening up a new realm of research into the start of human development and potentially life-saving regenerative medicines. In work described by one independent expert as "a major step forward," the scientists said they had successfully rebooted pluripotent stem cells so they were equivalent to those of a seven to 10-day old embryo, before it implants in the womb.More

'Electronic skin' could revolutionize breast cancer detection
Medical News Today
A group of scientists are currently working on the development of an "electronic skin" that has the capacity to detect — or "feel" — and produce images of small lumps in breast tissue that the practiced fingers of a clinician could miss. The new technology could lead to improving cancer survival rates by over 94 percent if it can successfully detect lumps and accurately determine their shape when they are less than 10 millimeters in length.More

Deactivating a cell protein may halt progress of rheumatoid arthritis
Medical News Today
Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease that leads to inflammation and bone erosion in the joints. One of the hallmarks is swelling and pain caused by white blood cells flooding into the fluid around the joints. Now researchers have shown for the first time that the activation of a single protein on the surface of these cells could be the trigger for the disease.More

How silent genes are activated
HealthCanal
DNA methylation is a dynamic and reversible process that governs gene expression during development and disease. Several examples of active DNA demethylation have been documented, involving genome-wide and gene-specific DNA demethylation.More

3-D model shows survival strategies of bacteria
HealthCanal
Bacteria are particularly ingenious when it comes to survival strategies. They often create a biofilm to protect themselves from a hostile environment, for example during treatment with antibiotics, and scientists have unraveled the secrets of how they do this with a new 3-D model.More

Stem cell research offers clues about schizophrenia
HealthDay News
New research involving stem cells may provide clues about the chemical basis for schizophrenia, scientists report. Brain cells of people with this chronic and disabling brain disorder give off higher amounts of three neurotransmitters linked to a range of psychiatric disorders, researchers found. Neurotransmitters are chemicals that trigger or block the transmission of electrical signals in the brain.More

Understanding today's trends in health care and the clinical laboratory and pathology testing marketplace
DARK Daily
Clinical diagnostic laboratories, pathology groups and health care institutions are carrying significant and potentially unsustainable levels of unreimbursed services. Although bad debt and uncompensated care in the health care industry are not new, they have been increasing at the same time that downward pressure is being applied to reimbursement. More

10 states report outbreak of respiratory illness in kids
USA Today
VideoBriefOfficials in 10 states are reporting cases of respiratory illness, some severe enough to send children to hospitals. In Kansas City, Missouri, more than 300 cases of respiratory illnesses were reported in August, according to the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services. About 15 percent of the illnesses resulted in children being placed in an intensive care unit, according to a health alert issued Aug. 29.More

Researcher has a radical idea for a drinkable, probiotic HIV vaccine
The Washington Post
Like others before him, Jean-Marie Andrieu believes he may have hit upon the long sought after HIV vaccine. And like numerous other treatments under development, the hitch is that the vaccine has only thus far only shown to be effective in protecting monkeys against the simian immunodeficiency virus or SIV, the monkey equivalent to HIV. More

Ultimate human stem cells created in the laboratory
New Scientist
A new type of human stem cell, never seen in nature, has been made in the laboratory. The cells may be the primordial embryonic cell from which all our cells are created. They should be better at making replacement organs than existing stem cells. "We see it as a blank canvas, the starting point for all tissues in the body," says Austin Smith of the University of Cambridge, who led the team that developed the cells.More

Scientists 'reset' stem cells to study start of human development
Reuters
British and Japanese scientists have managed to "reset" human stem cells to their earliest state, opening up a new realm of research into the start of human development and potentially life-saving regenerative medicines. In work described by one independent expert as "a major step forward," the scientists said they had successfully rebooted pluripotent stem cells so they were equivalent to those of a seven to 10-day old embryo, before it implants in the womb.More

Why age reduces stem cells' ability to repair muscle
Ottawa Hospital Research Institute via ScienceDaily
As we age, stem cells throughout our bodies gradually lose their capacity to repair damage, even from normal wear and tear. Researchers from the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and University of Ottawa have discovered the reason why this decline occurs in our skeletal muscle. Their findings were published online in the influential journal Nature Medicine.More

Top 10 rankings of EHR market share put Epic 1st as hospitals, physicians and clinical laboratories make progress on interoperability
DARK Daily
Across the nation, clinical laboratories and pathology groups are busy interfacing their laboratory information systems to the electronic health record systems of their client hospitals and physicians. Yet, few laboratory managers know which EHR systems are dominating the market and which EHR systems are barely surviving. More

Simple method turns human skin cells into infection-fighting white blood cells
Salk Institute for Biological Studies via Infection Control Today
For the first time, scientists have turned human skin cells into transplantable white blood cells, soldiers of the immune system that fight infections and invaders. The work, done at the Salk Institute, could let researchers create therapies that introduce into the body new white blood cells capable of attacking diseased or cancerous cells or augmenting immune responses against other disorders.More

Worldwide study demonstrates accuracy of genetic analyses
Mayo Clinic via ScienceDaily
Physicians envision a future in which genomic data from patients is heavily used to manage care, but experts have questioned the accuracy and reliability of these analyses. Now, a study by 150 researchers in 12 countries finds real strength and agreement across RNA genomic sequencing techniques and laboratories — as well as ways to improve what little variability exists to set a new high standard.More