ASCLS eNewsBytes
Oct. 21, 2014

Study backs use of stem cells in retina
The New York Times
Since they were first isolated 16 years ago, human embryonic stem cells have been thought to have the potential to replace the body's worn-out tissues and treat a wide variety of diseases. The progress has been slow. But now researchers are reporting an encouraging step.More

Researchers uncover molecular pathway possibly leading to better treatments for bipolar affective disorder
Medical News Today
Researchers at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and three other institutions have identified what may be the molecular pathway underlying bipolar I disorder (BPI), a breakthrough that could lead to better drugs for treating bipolar affective disorder, as well as depression and other related mood disorders. The findings are being published online in Nature Molecular Psychiatry. More

Companies developing noninvasive and wearable glucose monitoring devices that can report test data in real time to physicians and clinical laboratories
DARK Daily
Because of the tremendous volume of glucose tests performed daily throughout the world, many companies are developing noninvasive methods for glucose testing. Their goal is a patient-friendly technology that does not require a needle stick or venipuncture and may even eliminate the need to send specimens to a medical laboratory. More

Faster laboratory test will check for rare respiratory virus, which means a surge in confirmed cases is coming
The Washington Post
As a rare respiratory virus continues to sicken children around the country, spreading to hundreds in almost every state in a matter of weeks, the actual number of infections has remained a mystery. That is because the volume of possible cases requiring testing has been so large — and the testing process so, so slow — that public health officials are still working through a backlog that stretches back about a month.More

Scientific breakthrough will help design antibiotics of the future
University of Bristol via ScienceDaily
Computer simulations have been used to show how bacteria are able to destroy antibiotics — a breakthrough which will help develop drugs which can effectively tackle infections in the future.More

Mosquito-borne Chikungunya virus likely to reach Mexico
Reuters
Mexico is very likely to join the list of countries to register cases of the painful mosquito-borne viral disease chikungunya, a senior health ministry official said. Chikungunya is spread by two mosquito species, and is typically not fatal but can cause debilitating symptoms including fever, headache and severe joint pain lasting months.More

Discovery may lead to lower doses of chemotherapy
HealthCanal
No matter what type of chemotherapy you attack a tumor with, many cancer cells resort to the same survival tactic: They start eating themselves. Scientists at Brigham Young University discovered the two proteins that pair up and switch on this process — known as autophagy.More

Expert: Need for restrictive quarantine measures, individual responsibility is great
Washington University in St. Louis via Infection Control Today
Recent revelations that Dr. Nancy Snyderman, NBC News' chief medical correspondent, violated a mandatory Ebola quarantine after returning from Africa, and that a Dallas health care worker infected with the virus boarded a commercial jet have focused the nation's attention on Ebola and what can be done to protect citizens. While measures like quarantine do restrict the freedom of exposed individuals, they do so to protect the public's health, says a Washington University in St. Louis expert on biomedical ethics.More

Study backs use of stem cells in retina
The New York Times
Since they were first isolated 16 years ago, human embryonic stem cells have been thought to have the potential to replace the body's worn-out tissues and treat a wide variety of diseases. The progress has been slow. But now researchers are reporting an encouraging step.More

Scientists explain how rabies 'hijacks' neurons to attack the brain
Tel Aviv University via Infection Control Today
Rabies causes acute inflammation of the brain, producing psychosis and violent aggression. The virus, which paralyzes the body's internal organs, is always deadly for those unable to obtain vaccines in time. Some 55,000 people die from rabies every year. For the first time, Tel Aviv University scientists have discovered the exact mechanism this killer virus uses to efficiently enter the central nervous system, where it erupts in a toxic explosion of symptoms.More

Study: Older antibiotic still works against Staphhylococcus infections
HealthDay News
An older antibiotic called vancomycin is still effective in treating dangerous Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections, a new study finds. The findings show that doctors should keep using vancomycin to treat Staphylococcus aureus infections even though there are several newer antibiotics available to do the job, University of Nebraska researchers said.More

CDC: Most kindergartners are getting their shots
HealthDay News
Most American children entering kindergarten are getting their required vaccinations, a new report shows. Coverage for the 2013-2014 school year ranged from 95 percent for the diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis vaccine to 94.7 percent for two doses of the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine and 93.3 percent for two doses of varicella vaccine, the report found.More