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Researchers measure concussion forces in greatest detail yet
Stanford University
More than 40 million people worldwide suffer from concussions each year, but scientists are just beginning to understand the traumatic forces that cause the injury. Now, a team of engineers and physicians at Stanford University has provided the first-ever measurements of all the acceleration forces imparted on the brain during a diagnosed concussion. The findings could lead to better injury detection, or toward developing safer protective gear.
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Could fear of concussions be the end of high school football?
The Daily Journal
As the Wilmington High School Wildcats began their march to the state championship this year, a former prep player from suburban Niles was filing a lawsuit that could blow the whistle on all youth football across Illinois. The issue is concussions. The statistics on this type of injury are unreliable, because no one knows how many cases of brain-damaging concussions go undiagnosed each year.
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8 ways dentists can use their time more efficiently
Dentistry IQ
It's important to run your dental office as efficiently as possible. When an office runs well, you can see more patients and keep them happy during their visit to your office. Your patients have lives too, and they don't want to spend hours in your waiting room. Here are some tips to help dentists use their time more efficiently so everyone is happy.
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How much rest is best after concussion?
MedPage Today
While rest in the first day or two following a concussion may help prevent further damage to the injured brain, prolonged rest may actually impede recovery in young patients, according to a study in the journal Pediatrics. Standard practice of 24 to 48 hours of rest after concussion is based upon limited data, and many have advocated for extended periods of rest in a dark and quiet room, also known as "cocooning."
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Is neck strengthening the key to concussion prevention?
USA Today
Before he was a doctor, Tad Seifert was a high school football player in Oklahoma. His stint as a wide receiver ended abruptly after a concussion. "Quite honestly, it scared my mom," he said. Instead, Seifert ran track at Oklahoma State University. Now, the 40-year-old is a clinical assistant professor of neurology at the University of Kentucky and is director of Norton Healthcare's Sports Concussion Program.
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Going strong in 2015: Hiring and retaining great dental employees
By Laura Winzeler
Dental patients look forward to seeing friendly and familiar faces when they arrive for appointments. Their comfort and trust levels depend on this continuity of care from the moment they open the door. High staff turnover is not only financially costly, it also takes a toll on the perceived competence of the practice administrator. Resolve to sharpen your leadership abilities in 2015 and become even more effective at hiring and retaining great dental office employees.
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A potential long-lasting treatment for sensitive teeth
Science Daily
Rather than soothe and comfort, a hot cup of tea or cocoa can cause people with sensitive teeth a jolt of pain. But scientists are now developing a new biomaterial that can potentially rebuild worn enamel and reduce tooth sensitivity for an extended period. They have tested the material on dogs.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    All for lack of a good dental office manager (By Jill Nesbitt)
5 strategies dentists should use to retain patients (Dentistry IQ)
How to run a stress-free dental practice this holiday season (Dental Practice Management)
High school football player files lawsuit over concussion protocols (CNN via WITI-TV)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


5 ways your practice can take emergency patients in stride
Dental Practice Management
By their very nature, emergency cases come up without warning and can therefore disrupt a dental practice's schedule. There are, however, several ways practices can prepare for handling emergencies, minimizing their impact on the day's planned activities without reducing the quality of care provided to the patients with urgent needs.
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California governor signs CDA-sponsored bill protecting patient premiums
Dental Tribune International
California Gov. Jerry Brown has signed legislation into law that will bring increased accountability and transparency to dental insurance plans in California, according to the California Dental Association. Assembly Bill 1962, authored by Assemblymember Nancy Skinner (D-Berkeley), establishes standardized requirements for dental plans to disclose how they spend patient premium dollars and puts the state on a path to establish a minimum percentage of premium dollars that must be spent on patient care.
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Dental spending growth slower
ADA
Government actuaries cited slower growth in dental spending than projected just three months earlier in a study revising the post-recession National Health Expenditures narrative from "low rates of growth" to "slowdown." The 3.6 percent increase in the 2013 rate of growth in the overall health economy is the lowest on record since NHE record keeping began in 1960, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Office of the Actuary said.
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ASD Update
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Disclaimer: ASD Update is a digest of the most important news selected for the ASD from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. ASD does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the ASD.


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