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Girls suffer concussions at a higher rate than boys
The Washington Post
The flood of media attention highlighting damaged brains, dementia and suicides in retired NFL players has made concussions synonymous with football. That attention was greatly needed; the debilitating consequences of brain injuries in football players of all ages has been severely overlooked. But the focus of this controversy has been far too narrow. It's true that young players need better equipment and stricter safety standards on the gridiron. But in many of the most popular sports, boys aren't the ones most likely to be afflicted by concussions. Girls are.
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Bill would expand concussion training for Indiana coaches
WANE-TV
There are more than 160,000 high school athletes, and a similar number of middle school athletes in Indiana. Current state law already requires concussion training for all high school coaches, but what about younger grades? A new bill would expand that training for coaches of sports starting in fifth grade. The training only takes about a half hour to complete. It's something the bill's author said is necessary to protect student athletes at a critical age.
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What your tongue says about your health
By Dorothy L. Tengler
Can we reveal our health by simply examining our tongues? It is not uncommon for doctors and other healthcare practitioners to ask their patients to open up and say "ahhh." A close look at the tongue can reveal a lot of hidden information about the overall state of our health. Now, we no longer need to be in a doctor's office to have our tongues inspected for possible illness. A group of engineers in India has designed a digital tongue analysis software to help people in remote areas who may not have access to a physician.
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Medicaid patients struggle to get dental care
Kaiser Health News via USA Today
Colorado was one of five states last year to begin offering routine dental coverage to millions of low-income adults in Medicaid — an unprecedented expansion. But many have had trouble finding dentists willing to treat them because of Medicaid's low pay, say providers, advocates and patients. The upshot is that many Medicaid enrollees continue to live with the pain and discomfort of tooth decay and gum disease, which can exacerbate other health problems, such as heart disease, diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis.
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Important lessons about dental staff compensation
Dental Practice Management
Staff compensation is one of the most important subjects to the dental team; however, dentists often disregard it. And for a subject that is so often dismissed, many staff salaries are skyrocketing the practice overhead. Keeping the topic of compensation taboo creates confusion, anger and alienation, usually at the expense of the office in staff turnover.
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Concussion research may lead to color-changing mouthguards
Sporting News
Following the discussion about Julian Edelman's concussion-like symptoms in the Super Bowl, ESPN took a look at how players treat concussions. What it found is what's mostly known already. Players often lie about their symptoms in order to continue playing. Lawrence Jackson, one of the players they spoke to, admitted he knew he had a concussion, but was able to pass all of the sideline tests because he was still able to answer the questions.
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7 signs your dental practice but not productive
Dentistry IQ
So what's your definition of "busy?" Is it a patient reception area that's brimming with patients? A schedule that has you and your energized staff doing hallway sprints from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.? Is it a day that keeps you and your team at the top of your game and on track with your goals? For some it is synonymous with stress. For others it means excitement and challenge. Then there are those who see "busy" as the precise balance between a fully engaged team and profitable practice. They are, however, the exception.
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NFL knocks out its concussion study
Bloomberg View
The National Football League has quietly announced that it is suspending a pilot program to track player concussions with helmet sensors. The sensors track the frequency and velocity of hits to the head, and will still be used in other studies from the youth level up to college. According to the NFL's head, neck and spine committee, the more than 11,000 pieces of data its study collected during the 2013 season were unreliable, because for the most accurate reading, hits had to be squarely on the helmet's center of gravity.
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75 percent of parents miss bringing children to dentist by age 1
Dental Tribune International
A new survey indicates that 75 percent of parents are not complying with the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommendation to take children to the dentist by age 1. The survey found that parents in the general population bring their children to the dentist for the first time at the average age of 2 1/2.
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Vanderbilt basketball concussions pile up
The Tennessean
Three Vanderbilt basketball players continue to recover from concussions, but one might be career-ending. Coach Kevin Stallings said senior forward Shelby Moats might not return this season after suffering his second concussion in practice in the past two months. Point guard Shelton Mitchell and forward Jeff Roberson, both freshmen, practiced on a limited basis recently.
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ASD Update
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Disclaimer: ASD Update is a digest of the most important news selected for the ASD from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. ASD does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the ASD.


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