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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit          April 08, 2014

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ASHA NEWS

ASHA to partner with Oregon School Based Health Alliance on 2014 Conference
American School Health Association
ASHA is excited to announce a partnership with the Oregon School Based Health Alliance on ASHA’s 2014 Annual Conference that will be held October 9-11 in Portland, Ore. This partnership provides additional exposure for our conference to prospective attendees who are professionals in the school-based health space in the state of Oregon. As a result of the additional 100-200 attendees (estimated) with backgrounds in school-based health, this partnership will undoubtedly increase the value of the conference for all attendees.
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ASHA announces 3 upcoming webinars
American School Health Association
ASHA is pleased to announce the rollout of three upcoming webinars that are scheduled in April and May. Topics will include training tools for healthy schools, smart snacks and sex ed standards. For a listing of dates, times and speakers, please visit our ASHA webinars page. You can register for "Training Tools for Healthy Schools" now. We’ll distribute registration links for the other two webinars very soon via email, social media and CHEN.
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Call for nominations still open for some 2014 ASHA Awards
American School Health Association
The call for nominations is still open for a few of the 2014 ASHA Awards. To nominate a colleague for any of the following ASHA Awards, please click on award descriptions and criteria:
  • Health Coordinator
  • Legislator of the Year
  • Outstanding Health Educator
  • Outstanding School Nurse Achievement
  • Superintendents' School Health Leadership
But hurry! The deadline for these nominations is Tuesday, April 15! Award recipients will be honored at the 88th Annual School Health Conference in Portland, Ore.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


A nurse in every Charlotte-Mecklenburg (NC) school gathering momentum
The Charlotte Observer
The movement to staff a nurse in each of Charlotte-Mecklenburg, N.C.'s 160 schools appears to be gaining momentum. County commissioners raised the issue to a high priority last year, adding 11 new nurses, and now County Manager Dena Diorio is considering recommending they spend $2.5 million to hire 32 more to meet the goal of placing a nurse in every school. Even if that many nurses were added, though, the county would still fall below the national standard of one nurse for every 750 students set by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, where new Mecklenburg Health Director Marcus Plescia worked before he was hired in January.
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How gender affects the behavior of teen drivers
The Atlantic
Parents might be justified in wringing their hands over their high schoolers' driving habits. A car accident is the most likely reason a teen won’t make it to adulthood. And teens are far more likely than adults to crash their cars while distracted. In a study in the January issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers found that, compared with the risk of crashing when not performing these tasks, novice teen drivers were eight times more likely to crash or have a near-miss when dialing a phone; seven times more likely to crash when reaching for a phone or another object; almost four times more likely when texting; and three times more likely when eating. But one of the most distracting things, according to some studies, is just having another teen in the car.
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Study: Sexual violence among students is a significant problem as early as middle school
The Huffington Post
A substantial amount of sexual violence in middle school takes place right under teachers' noses in the classroom, according to a new study. The study, conducted by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, found that 27 percent of surveyed girls and 25 percent of surveyed boys reported facing a form of sexual violence on middle school grounds in the past year. Most often, the sexual violence took place in school hallways or classrooms.
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Teens' screen time may affect their bone health
WebMD
Spending too much time sitting in front of screens may be linked to poorer bone health in teen boys, according to a new study from Norway. It included 484 boys and 463 girls, aged 15 to 18, who underwent bone mineral density tests. They were asked about lifestyle habits, including how much time they spent in front of the television or computer on weekends, and their levels of physical activity.
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Study: Childhood obesity adds nearly $20,000 to lifetime medical costs
HealthDay News via Philly.com
Over a lifetime, direct medical costs for an obese 10-year-old will be nearly $20,000 higher than those of slimmer peers, according to new research. That translates to a whopping $14 billion in additional direct U.S. medical costs over a lifetime for today's obese 10-year-olds, according to the study. And, those costs only include direct medical costs, such as medications or medical procedures related to obesity. They don't include indirect costs, such as lost productivity and quality-of-life issues, the researchers said.
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Researchers: 1 in 68 children is autistic
Newsday
Autism now affects 1 in every 68 children, a 30 percent rise since last reported two years ago, federal researchers found in a new multistate analysis. The investigation also shows that boys are five times more likely to have an autism spectrum disorder than girls. The findings are based on a wide-ranging examination of medical records and abstracts of school-based services provided to 8-year-olds in 11 states.
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Healthy fast food advertising for kids goes unnoticed
Medical News Today
In 2009, fast food restaurants agreed to include healthy foods in advertising targeted at children in order to combat the obesity epidemic in the U.S. Now, a new study examining children's reactions to such ads suggests the healthy message is lost in unclear depictions of the foods.
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As popularity rises, so does risk of being bullied
USA Today
Adolescents are often targeted for bullying because of their appearance, sexual orientation or loner status. But not all bullying victims fit that profile. New research suggests that as students become more popular and climb the social hierarchy of middle and high school, they are at increased risk for gossip, harassment and even physical attacks from rivals competing for status.
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Study: Eczema doesn't go away in most children
The Boston Globe
A new study published in JAMA Dermatology suggests children may not outgrow eczema: Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania followed more than 7,100 children with eczema for several years and found that the skin condition lingered through the teens. Only 50 percent of those who reached age 20 had at least one six-month period where they were free of symptoms. This runs counter to what most dermatologists are taught during training: That 50 to 70 percent of children with eczema — referred to medically as atopic dermatitis — will be free of their symptoms by age 12, the authors wrote.
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Weaker gut instinct makes teens open to risky behavior
Duke University via Medical Xpress
Making a snap decision usually means following your initial reaction — going with your gut. That intuitive feeling sprouts from the limbic system, the evolutionarily older and simpler part of the brain that affects emotion, behavior and motivation. But during adolescence, the limbic system connects and communicates with the rest of the brain differently than it does during adulthood, leaving many adolescents vulnerable to riskier behaviors, according to Duke University researchers.
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For many teens, indoor tanning tied to weight control issues
PsychCentral
A new study discovers that high school students who use indoor tanning also have higher rates of unhealthy weight control behaviors, such as taking diet pills or vomiting to lose weight. The association between indoor tanning and unhealthy weight control methods may be even stronger for male than female adolescents, according to Stephen M. Amrock and Michael Weitzman of New York University School of Medicine.
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Study shows more children with antibiotic-resistant infections
WXXI-TV
A new study shows an increase in the number of children exposed to antibiotic resistant bacteria. The study that appears in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society calls more children infected with antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria a serious "public health risk." Typically, healthy children are less likely than adults or children with persistent medical issues to have an infection that does not respond to antibiotics. The study that shows nearly 75 percent of the infections were not easily treated with oral antibiotics.
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