This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit          July 01, 2014

Home  |   Join  |   Conference  |   JOSH  |  
 


ASHA NEWS

Warm up for ASHA's Portland Conference with a webinar about Oregon school health
School Health Action
Registration is now open for Hallways to Health: Health and Education Collaborating to Make a Difference. Presented by ASHA’s Annual School Health Conference partner, the Oregon School Based Health Alliance (OSBHA), this session provides one example of how ASHA’s collaboration with OSBHA promises to provide exceptional content at the upcoming October conference.

Presented by Tammy Alexander, MEd, Member Services Director, OSBHA; Mandy LeBlanc, BA, Health Education Specialist, Group Health Cooperative; and Jamie Smeland, BA, Health & Wellness Coordinator, Milwaukie High School Health & Wellness Center, this webinar will focus on Oregon’s and Washington's experiences in a 2-year national initiative, “Hallways to Health, a Thriving Schools Initiative." The project demonstrated how schools and school-based health centers (SBHCs) can work effectively together to facilitate improvements in health care and behavior among students, their families and school staff.

If you’ve missed any of our webinars, you can find their recordings here.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article




And don't forget to register for ASHA's 88th Annual School Health Conference!
School Health Action
ASHA’s 88th Annual School Health Conference will be held in Portland, Oregon, during Oct. 9-11. We’ll kick off with two pre-con sessions, one of which is another collaboration with OSBHA on the topic of "Discussing Sensitive Topics with Youth." View the full conference schedule here, and register for the conference and pre-conference sessions here. ASHA has reserved a block of rooms at the Hilton Portland & Executive Tower at the rate of $145/night + tax.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


INDUSTRY NEWS


Children caffeine study shows it has different effects as they age
NewsMax
A new study suggests that children, as they get into their teen years, process caffeine differently based on their gender. About three out of four U.S. children consume caffeine on a daily basis each day according to research published earlier this year. However, there isn’t a lot of data about the safety of caffeinated beverages and their effects on children.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Gay teen suicide more likely after religious counseling
EDGE
So much for "let go and let God." A new study shows that gay youth who are counseled by a religious leader were more likely to attempt suicide than those who sought no treatment at all. The Williams Institute has found that while youth who received therapy from a medical professional fared about the same as those who talked to no one at all, those who sought help from religious leaders were found to have a higher risk of suicide.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Study: Teens who prefer menthols are heavier smokers
HealthDay News
Teens who use menthol cigarettes are heavier smokers than those who smoke non-menthols, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed data from a 2010-11 survey of more than 4,700 Canadian high school students who smoked and found that one-third of them smoked menthol cigarettes. Menthol cigarette users smoked an average of 43 cigarettes a week, compared with 26 per week among those who did not smoke menthol cigarettes, the researchers found.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Childhood stress has lasting impacts on brain
Laboratory Equipment
For children, stress can go a long way. A little bit provides a platform for learning, adapting and coping. But a lot of it — chronic, toxic stress like poverty, neglect and physical abuse — can have lasting negative impacts. A team of University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers recently showed these kinds of stressors, experienced in early life, might be changing the parts of developing children's brains responsible for learning, memory and the processing of stress and emotion.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Study: Being a 'cool' kid has downside later on
The Boston Globe
What ever happened to those “cool” kids in junior high? The girls who wore heavy makeup, had serial boyfriends and necked in the halls, and the boys who smoked, stole beers from the fridge and dated the cool girls? It turns out such kids are more likely as adults to get into trouble with drugs, alcohol and the law, a recent study finds. The research, published earlier this month in the journal Child Development, involved tracking 184 volunteers from age 13 to 23 and found that those who met certain criteria for “cool” in middle school — they dated, experimented with smoking or alcohol, had prettier friends, and were obsessed with being in the popular group — were 45 percent more likely to be alcoholics or drug users at age 23 compared to those who weren’t cool in middle school.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Teen marijuana use linked to lower IQ in later life
Deseret News
Earlier this month, three researchers at the National Institute of Drug Abuse published an article in the New England Journal of Medicine surveying the current state of the evidence. According to their report, marijuana use in adolescence and early adulthood may measurably lower users’ IQ decades later down the road. They conclude there is reason to believe marijuana may permanently harm the adolescent brain. Until the age of 21, the piece notes, the brain “is intrinsically more vulnerable than a mature brain to the adverse long-term effects of environmental insults.”
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Study: Obesity is undercounted in children
The Wall Street Journal
Childhood obesity might be a bigger problem than we thought. A new study finds that the commonly used body-mass-index measure may fail to identify as many as 25 percent of children, age 4 to 18 years, who have excess body fat. The meta-analysis, scheduled for publication online in the journal Pediatric Obesity reviewed 37 separate studies involving a combined 53,521 participants.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Autism and bullying in the US
Autism Daily Newscast
Bullying has always been an issue in American schools, but for students on the autism spectrum, it is especially problematic. Multiple studies consistently show that students with autism are more likely to be victims of bullying than their neurotypical peers. A 2012 study published in Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine reported that 46.3 percent of young people with autism were victims of bullying.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Body perception, eating disorders can differ among races
American Psychiatric Association
African-American women are more likely to be affected by binge eating disorder than anorexia or bulimia, indicating that race may affect the incidence of eating and other psychiatric disorders. While many studies of eating disorders have primarily focused on psychiatric and other factors in Caucasian women, little research has investigated these illnesses in African-American women.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Study finds male adolescents label girls who sext and girls who don't
TIME
If you’re asking an adolescent boy, a teenage girl is “insecure” or “slutty” if she sexts and “stuck up” or “a prude” if she doesn’t. A study published on Jun. 6, in the Journal of Children and Media, appropriately titled “Damned If You Do, Damned If You Don’t ... If You’re a Girl,” found that although both male and female adolescents send sexts, teenage girls’ behavior is labeled regardless of whether they sext or not. The discovery was made after University of Michigan researchers Julia Lippman and Scott Campbell distributed open-ended questonnaires to 51 adolescents aged 12-18 inquiring about participants’ sexting practices and thoughts on their peers who engage in sexting.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
 



School Health Action
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Lauren Swan , Content Editor, 202.684.7496  
Contribute news


Learn how to add us to your address book or safe sender list so our emails get to your inbox.

This edition of School Health Action was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!

Recent issues

June 17, 2014
June 3, 2014
May 20, 2014
May 6, 2014






7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063