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Drug may work for resistant CMV infections in transplant recipients
Renal & Urology News
Cidofovir with or without adjunctive therapy may be an appropriate treatment option for ganciclovir-resistant cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients, according to study findings reported at the 53rd Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy.
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SOCIETY NEWS


Be in the Next Chimera
ASTS
ASTS' member magazine, Chimera, offers a great way to let your colleagues know about your latest career move, hire, or award: our "People and Places" section. Also, please consider submitting a short write-up and photo of your transplant program in "Across the Field." The next issue is scheduled to come out in November, so please submit your information or any questions you may have to diane.mossholder@asts.org by Oct. 8.
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Vote for AJT!
ASTS
Calling all American Journal of Transplantation authors, reviewers, editorial board members, and members of the AJT community: "Vote AJT!" for ScholarOne's first Journal Triathlon!
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Help ASTS Celebrate!
ASTS
A highlight of the Winter Symposium will be the 40th Anniversary Gala, and you can help ASTS celebrate by sending any photos you may have that reflect on the history of the Society. Please look through your old (or not so old) photos and send the ones that catch your eye to diane.mossholder@asts.org. Don't worry if you only have prints — just mail them to the ASTS National Office, Attn: Diane Mossholder, 2461 S. Clark St., Suite 640, Arlington, VA 22202, and we will return them to you!
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TOP NEWS


Will China's organ transplant reforms really work?
The Atlantic
The now oft-derided Chinese Red Cross once again found itself in hot water in July, when it was reported that some branches have asked organ transplant hospitals to pay 100,000 RMB (US $16,300) for each successful organ donation organized by them. In August, the People’s Daily reported that an organ donation coordinator for the Shannxi branch of the Red Cross threatened to take away a critically injured patient’s breathing machine if the family continued to refuse to donate his organs in the event of a cardiac death. The coordinator, Liu Linjuan, said to the family that if they were willing to donate, "we can give you 100,000 RMB. No more than that."
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Organ donation: Presumed consent to start in Dec. 2015
BBC News
People in Wales will be presumed to have agreed for their organs to be donated after death from Dec. 2015. Wales will be the first U.K. nation to introduce a system where consent is assumed unless people have opted out. The legislation, described by ministers as the "most significant" the Welsh assembly had passed, recently received royal assent. Currently, people across the U.K. join a voluntary scheme and carry a card if they wish to donate organs.
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Effects of N-acetylcysteine on cytokines in non-acetaminophen acute liver failure: potential mechanism of improvement in transplant-free survival
Liver International (login required)
N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) improves transplant-free survival in patients with non-acetaminophen acute liver failure (ALF) when administered in early stages of hepatic encephalopathy. The mechanisms of this benefit are unknown.
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A two-year prospective study of bone health in children after renal transplantation employing two imaging techniques
Clinical Transplantation (login required)
The aim of this study was to prospectively and longitudinally evaluate bone properties with the use of two bone imaging techniques (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry [DXA], and quantitative ultraSonography [QUS]) in pediatric renal transplant recipients.
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Order of donor type in pediatric kidney transplant recipients requiring retransplantation
Transplantation (login required)
Living-donor kidney transplantation (KT) is encouraged for children with end-stage renal disease due to superior long-term graft survival compared with deceased-donor KT. Despite this, there has been a steady decrease in the use of living-donor KT for pediatric recipients. Due to their young age at transplantation, most pediatric recipients eventually require retransplantation, and the optimal order of donor type is not clear.
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Laboratory-based scoring system for prediction of hepatic inflammatory activity in patients with autoimmune hepatitis
Liver International (login required)
In autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), inflammation is closely related to fibrosis. Although transaminase levels are commonly used to assess hepatic inflammation, they may not relate directly to the histology. A noninvasive diagnostic score has been developed as an alternative to liver biopsy to help optimize treatment for AIH and monitor disease progress.
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Cancer risk after ABO-incompatible living-donor kidney transplantation
Transplantation (login required)
Recipients of ABO-incompatible living-donor kidney transplants often undergo more intense immunosuppression than their ABO-compatible counterparts. It is unknown if this difference leads to higher cancer risk after transplantation. Single-center studies are too small and lack adequate duration of follow-up to answer this question.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed our previous issues? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Test could warn of problems for kidney transplant recipients (ScienceNews)
Implantable, artificial kidney: Shuvo Roy, Ph.D. (Renal & Urology News)
Kidney transplant recipient with BK virus infection: Practice points for clinicians (Medscape (login required))
HCC in Liver Transplantation: Appearances Are Everything Defining Imaging Characteristics for HCC in Liver Transplantation (ASTS)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

ASTS NewsBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Tammy Gibson, Content Editor, 469.420.2677   
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