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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit          April 18, 2014

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Calendar of
upcoming
events

March 21-22
FPMRS Comprehensive Review Course — Registration Open!

July 21-26
AUGS-IUGA 2014 Scientific Meeting



 



Calling all AUGS physician members working in private practice!
AUGS
The membership of the American Urogynecologic Society (AUGS) is comprised of a diverse group of individuals working in different professional settings, such as academic centers, hospitals, and private practice. In order to ensure that AUGS is serving and meeting the needs of all membership types and professional affiliations, we are collecting information from our members.

If you currently work in private practice, AUGS wants your input on how to "maximize" your member experience. Please take a few minutes to complete the Private Practice Survey.

Please follow this link to complete the survey by Monday, April 28: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/augsprivatepractice.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact AUGS at info@augs.org or call (202) 367-1167.
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Register now for the AUGS-IUGA 2014 Scientific Meeting
AUGS
Attend the AUGS-IUGA 2014 Scientific Meeting and join the largest venue for those in the field of urogynecology and Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery to come together for education, networking and sharing.

Check out the latest information on Workshops and Roundtable Breakfasts before completing your registration. Be sure to register by May 11 to save!

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Pelvic Floor Dialogues — Issue 4 now available for your patients
AUGS
Pelvic Floor Dialogues – Issue 4 is now available on VoicesforPFD.org. The newsletter is designed to update patients on the latest pelvic floor research and connect them to valuable resources.

Articles in Pelvic Floor Dialogues — Issue 4 include:
  • Is it Time for a New OAB Med?
  • Uh, Doc, I Think My Pessary Doesn't Fit
  • Urinary Incontinence — A Global Problem for Moms-to-be
  • Speaking of Kegels — When's the Last Time You Did "It" Standing Up?
  • Researchers Identify Potential Causes of Severe Fecal Incontinence
A copy of the current issue, as well as past issues, can be viewed on VoicesforPFD.org. To subscribe or to request an email copy to send to your patients, please email info@augs.org.

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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Register now for the AUGS-IUGA 2014 Scientific Meeting
AUGS
Attend the AUGS-IUGA 2014 Scientific Meeting and join the largest venue for those in the field of urogynecology and Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery to come together for education, networking and sharing.

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read more
Urogenital disorders after pelvic ring injuries
Central European Journal of Urology via PubMed
The close anatomical relationship between the skeletal and connective systems of the pelvis, neurological, and vascular structures and pelvic organs are predisposing factors for structural and functional damages of the urogenital system.

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The anatomical outcome of robotic sacrocolpopexy for treatment of pelvic organ prolapse
Surgical Technology International via PubMed
The purpose of this study is to compare the anatomical outcome of robotic sacrocolpopexy for pelvic organ prolapse in women with a body mass index of 30 and higher to those with a BMI under 30.

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FPMRS ARTICLES


Clinical and video urodynamic characteristics of adult women with dysfunctional voiding
Journal of the Formosan Medical Association via PubFacts
Dysfunctional voiding is an abnormality of bladder emptying in neurologically normal individuals where the external sphincter activity increases during voiding. This study investigated the clinical presentations and videourodynamic characteristics of adult women with DV. A total of 1,605 women with lower urinary tract symptoms were investigated with videourodynamic studies from 1997 to 2010. The clinical urinary symptoms and VUD characteristics of DV were compared with a group of urodynamically normal controls.
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Improving the clinical prediction of detrusor overactivity by utilizing additional symptoms and signs to overactive bladder symptoms alone
International Urogynecology Journal via PubMed
Researchers in Australia attempted to improve the accuracy of the clinical diagnosis of detrusor overactivity by using other significant clinical parameters in addition to overactive bladder symptoms alone. A total of 1,140 women attending their initial urogynecological assessment, including urodynamics, due to symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunction, underwent a comprehensive clinical and urodynamic assessment. Multivariate logistic regression analysis of a wide range of clinical parameters was used to determine a model of factors most accurately predicting the urodynamic diagnosis of DO.
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TOT Approach in stress urinary incontinence — outcome in obese female
BMC Urology
There is little data available on the outcome of tension-free obturator tape procedures in overweight and obese women. In this study, researchers sought to verify the objective and subjective outcomes of TOT in women with a higher body mass index. They evaluated the records of 116 patients who had undergone TOT, stratifying by BMI into normal weight, overweight and obese groups.
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Both the middle and distal sections of the urethra may be regarded as optimal targets for 'outside-in' transobturator tape placement
World Journal of Urology via Springer
Researchers in Poland sought to investigate whether the position of the tape under the urethra may influence "outside-in" transobturator sling outcome. The study comprised 141 women who underwent TOT for clinically and urodynamically proved stress urinary incontinence. The postoperative ultrasound examination with an endovaginal biplane probe was performed before discharging the patients from hospital. The measurements obtained described the position of the tape relative to the urethra and pubic symphysis, as well as anatomical relationships in the anterior compartment.
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Prevalence, risk factors, quality of life, and healthcare seeking behaviors of female urinary incontinence: Results from the 4th Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey VI
International Neurourology Journal
The International Continence Society defines urinary incontinence as "the complaint of any involuntary leakage of urine." UI is an important health problem resulting in psychological, social, and hygienic impairment, thus affecting the lives of the patients as well as their family. However, there are no studies on the overall prevalence, risk factors, quality of life, and healthcare-seeking behaviors of women with UI in South Korea.
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FPMRS NEWSBRIEFS


Streamlining biofeedback for urge incontinence
Medscape
The aim of this study was to determine the important elements of biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle exercises to treat urge incontinence. Urge suppression and pelvic floor muscle exercises were most beneficial. Responders can be identified early in treatment, allowing for fewer sessions.
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Surge in narcotic prescriptions for pregnant women
The New York Times
Doctors are prescribing opioid painkillers to pregnant women in astonishing numbers, new research shows, even though risks to the developing fetus are largely unknown. The reasons behind the surge in opioid use are unclear. Pregnancy has always entailed discomfort. A growing fetus may place pressure on the mother’s nerves, causing sciatica. Weight gain, posture changes and pelvic floor dysfunction all can result in discomfort and pain for mothers-to-be.
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FPMRS News

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Caitlin McNeely, Content Editor, 469.420.2692  
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