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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit          August 21, 2015

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The Bladder Health Week host form opens next week!
AUGS
The Bladder Health Week host form will be open from Monday, Aug. 24, 2015 to Friday, Sept. 4, 2015. All AUGS physician members will receive an email on Aug. 24 with the link to complete the form. All of the details of your event (date, time, and location) must be confirmed at this time. The first 15 organizations to complete the online host form will receive a $1,000 expense honorarium.

AUGS is providing you the tools to host an educational event in your community designed to further educate women on issues related to their pelvic health: prolapse, incontinence, and other pelvic floor disorders. Each host site is responsible for funding, planning, publicizing and hosting the event. AUGS has created a toolkit to help you plan your event.

AUGS strongly encourages all physician members of AUGS to host an event during Bladder Health Week. Last year over 75 events were held, and this year we are hoping to increase that number to 100!

Click here for more information!
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AUGS HIGHLIGHTS


Submit a late breaking abstract for PFD Week 2015 by Sept. 1
AUGS
AUGS accepts abstracts for oral, poster, and video presentations. Work submitted for presentation at this meeting may not have been previously published, and may not have been previously presented at another national Obstetrics and Gynecology (SGS, ACOG, AAGL) or Urology (SUFU, AUA) meeting. Abstracts that have been presented at non-OBGYN or Urology meetings will be accepted for poster presentation only and will not be eligible for prizes. The author must list where and when the research was presented at the bottom of the abstract when submitted. It is acceptable, however, for it to have been presented at an international meeting outside the United States.

Visit https://augs2015.abstractcentral.com/ to access the abstract site.

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Submit an abstract now for the PFD Week 2015 Fellows' Forum
AUGS
The Fellows' Forum, part of Fellows' Day at PFD Week 2015, is an opportunity for OB/GYN and Urology Fellows from across the country to meet one another and present their scientific work in a fellows-only podium session.

To present at the Fellows-only podium session, which will be a non-competitive atmosphere, Fellows must submit a written abstract for presentation at this Forum. Abstracts may be different from, or duplicates of those submitted to PFD Week, the AUGS Annual Scientific Meeting, and will be accepted to the Fellows' Forum whether or not they were accepted for presentation the meeting. Abstract submissions will be accepted until September 11.

Submit your abstract today.

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Register for AUGS' 36th Annual Meeting, PFD Week 2015!
AUGS
Join AUGS in Seattle from Oct. 13-17 for the premier of PFD Week, an expansion of the successful AUGS Annual Scientific Meeting. With the traditional two and a half days of scientific presentations and an addition of one day of clinical and surgical workshops, PFD Week 2015 is the go-to meeting for healthcare professionals interested in or actively practicing Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery.
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AUGS Weekly Poll
Question: What is your preferred route for prolapse repair?
ANSWER NOW

Click here to see the results of last week's poll.

Do you have an idea for a poll question? Email your question to info@augs.org to be reviewed by the AUGS Membership Committee.


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
 

ALLERGAN is continuing to research and develop new treatments for urogynecologists and urologists. In fact, that devotion is demonstrated by our considerable investment to address the continuum of care for patients with Overactive Bladder.
 


PHYSICIAN PAYMENT


Clarifying questions related to the July 6, 2015 CMS/AMA joint announcement and guidance regarding ICD-10 flexibilities
AUGS
National Coverage Determinations (NCD) and Local Coverage Determinations (LCD) often indicate specific diagnosis codes are required. The recent Guidance does not mean that the published NCDs and LCDs will be changed to include families of codes rather than specific codes. As stated in the CMS's Guidance, for 12 months after ICD-10 implementation, Medicare review contractors will not deny physician or other practitioner claims billed under the Part B physician fee schedule through either automated medical review or complex medical record review based solely on the specificity of the ICD-10 diagnosis code as long as the physician/practitioner used a valid code from the right family of code. The Medicare review contractors include the Medicare Administrative Contractors, the Recovery Auditors, the Zone Program Integrity Contractors, and the Supplemental Medical Review Contractor.

As such, the recent Guidance does not change the coding specificity required by the NCDs and LCDs. Coverage policies that currently require a specific diagnosis under ICD-9 will continue to require a specific diagnosis under ICD-10. It is important to note that these policies will require no greater specificity in ICD-10 than was required in ICD-9, with the exception of laterality, which does not exist in ICD-9. LCDs and NCDs that contain ICD-10 codes for right side, left side, or bilateral do not allow for unspecified side. The NCDs and LCDs are publically available and can be found at https://www.cms.gov/medicare-coverage-database/.

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FPMRS ARTICLES


Incidence and predictors of anal incontinence after obstetric anal sphincter injury in primiparous women
Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery
Although the onset of fecal incontinence or accidental bowel leakage usually occurs many years after a woman gives birth, structural damage to the anal sphincter at the time of delivery is a well-recognized risk factor. Up to 50 percent or greater (depending on the definition) of patients with obstetric anal sphincter injury develop incontinence of stool and/or gas, thus making them an appropriate target for prevention and treatment strategies.
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Office-based Neuromodulation for OAB
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O'Leary-Sant symptom index predicts the treatment outcome for onabotulinumtoxinA injections for refractory interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome
Toxins
Although intravesical injection of onabotulinumtoxinA has been proved promising in treating patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, what kind of patients that may benefit from this treatment remains unclear. This study investigated the predictors for a successful treatment outcome. Patients with IC/BPS who failed conventional treatments were enrolled to receive intravesical injection of 100 U of BoNT-A immediately followed by hydrodistention. Variables such as O'Leary-Sant symptom and problem indexes, pain visual analogue scale, functional bladder capacity, voiding diary, and urodynamic parameters were measured at baseline and six months after treatment.
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Pectineal ligament hysteropexy for uterine prolapse in premenopausal women by open and laparoscopic approach in Indian urban and rural centers
Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery
Uterine prolapse is commonly treated with vaginal hysterectomy and vaginal vault suspension. However, vaginal hysterectomy does not address the inherent weakness of support at level 11 evident by the common occurrence of vault prolapse after vaginal hysterectomy for uterine prolapse.2 Hysterectomy is known to compromise ovarian blood supply and induce earlier ovarian failure, exposing the woman to cardiovascular and skeletal morbidity.
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Long-term effects of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by sphincter-preserving resection on anal sphincter function in relation to quality of life among locally advanced rectal cancer patients
Radiation Oncology
There is growing recognition for the consequences of rectal cancer treatment to maintain an adequate functional sphincter in the long-term rather than preserving the anal sphincter itself. This study aims to evaluate long-term effects of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by sphincter-preserving resection on anal sphincter function in relation to quality of life among locally advanced rectal cancer patients.
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FPMRS NEWSBRIEFS


Study: Reproductive-age women suffer unexplained pelvic pain; many cases unreported
HNGN
Pelvic pain is a symptom of endometriosis, a disorder that affects the uterus lining. About 6.3 million women in their reproductive age in the United States are affected by this, according to the Endometriosis Association, but a new study says that there could be more cases that remain unreported.
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Vaginal mesh debacle breeds questionable profit schemes
Reuters via MedPage Today
In July 2013, California urogynecologist Andrew Cassidenti received an email from an entrepreneur named Otto Fisher, who had a proposition. Fisher was looking for surgeons to perform operations to remove pelvic mesh implants from women. Intrigued, Cassidenti responded. In a phone call, Fisher said he needed doctors to operate at outpatient centers in California and Las Vegas. Fisher said he could guarantee Cassidenti $2,500 for every surgery the doctor performed, "whether it took five minutes or two hours," or even if the doctor did not remove any mesh, according to the surgeon's sworn court statement recounting the conversation.
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Does laparoscopic hysterectomy lead to better outcomes?
Medscape
Laparoscopy carries multiple benefits. It requires a shorter hospital stay and allows faster recovery. Certain operative complications are less likely, and the mortality associated with it could differ. All of these complications, including cancer spread, are very rare and, therefore, cannot be studied in randomized trials.
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FPMRS News

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Caitlin McNeely, Senior Editor, 469.420.2692  
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