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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit          October 10, 2014

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First Presidential Blog
AUGS
I am very excited about taking over the AUGS Presidency from Dr. Charles Nager. His year was filled with accomplishments including advocating for members in areas of guidelines development, patient privacy issues, and the launch of our Pelvic Floor Disorders Registry. These are very big shoes to fill. Fortunately I have big feet! It is my honor to serve you this next year and I wanted to highlight recent developments and what you can expect later this year.

Recent Developments
I am pleased to announce our newest Special Interest Group — the Private Practice SIG. Last year we conducted a membership needs assessment and one of the major themes was that private practice providers did not feel that AUGS represented them or that there were opportunities for them to engage in volunteer roles to support AUGS initiatives. Developing a Private Practice SIG is just a first step in ensuring that this segment of our membership feels like they have a home within AUGS. We will continue to coordinate our efforts to ensure that the private practitioner feels like they are represented in the mission of AUGS. As a community practitioner for over 30 years I am familiar with the challenges of independent practice, payment models and keeping on the cutting-edge of our specialty. AUGS represents all members but those in private practice have voiced a concern that they feel pushed to the margins. I hope to change that perception this coming year.

A major focus this coming year and into the future is developing quality outcome measures for the subspecialty. The Quality Committee has developed 11 prolapse measures which are currently being validated and there is much more work to do. The Board recently approved the creation of a Quality Improvement and Outcomes Research Network (QI-ORN) to bring together members with a quality background, training and/or interest in developing an expertise in quality. We are excited to see this Network continue to evolve and launch in 2015.

In July, we announced that AUGS will be collaborating with SGS on the Fellows Pelvic Research Network (FPRN). The AUGS Research Committee noted that there is currently a gap in research opportunities for fellows to continue research into their early career. AUGS is launching a Junior Faculty Research Network (JFRN) for members within 10 years of completing fellowship. In 2015 the JFRN will launch with a pilot program focused on neuromodulation with a commitment to expand the topics in 2016.
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AUGS HIGHLIGHTS


Pelvic Rehab Coding Pitfalls — Appropriate use of CPT Code 91122 — Anorectal manometry
AUGS
Multiple studies have demonstrated the benefits of pelvic rehabilitation for women with pelvic floor disorders. Many FPMRS clinics now include pelvic rehab programs operating in continuity with physician services. This article highlights a potential pitfall in coding for pelvic rehab therapeutic encounters, and alerts our membership to do a self-audit to assure your pelvic rehab coding is in compliance.

The CPT code 91122 is for the diagnostic test — anorectal manometry — which is used to diagnose defacatory disorders and must be linked to an appropriate ICD-9 code for defacatory dysfunction. Anorectal manometry is a diagnostic test that measures the anal sphincter pressures and provides an assessment of rectal sensation, rectoanal reflexes, and rectal compliance. The diagnostic test uses a multichannel catheter in the rectum, and continuous manometry readings during testing. The CPT code 91122 is not an appropriate code to use for serial encounters for pelvic rehab therapy, or to diagnose or treat urinary incontinence.

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FPMRS ARTICLES


A meta-analysis of the performance of retropubic midurethral slings vs. transobturator midurethral slings
The Journal of Urology
A systematic literature review was performed using Medline limited to randomized controlled trials with a minimum follow-up of one year and type 1 grafts. Statistical analyses were performed using StatsDirect Version 2.7.9.
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SPONSORED CONTENT


Physiotherapy for women with stress urinary incontinence
Journal of Physical Therapy Science
This review article is designed to expose physiotherapists to a physiotherapy assessment of stress urinary incontinence and the treatment and possibly preventive roles that they might play for women with SUI. Specifically, the goal of this article is to provide an understanding of pelvic floor muscle function and the implications that this function has for physiotherapy treatment by reviewing articles published in this area.
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Posterior tibial nerve stimulation for pelvic floor dysfunction
Ginecología y Obstetricia de México via PubMed
Pelvic floor dysfunction is a highly prevalent functional pathology that affects women and can present with different clinical symptoms that include urinary urgency with or without incontinence, diurnal and nocturnal frequency, urinary retention, fecal incontinence, obstructive defecation, sexual dysfunction and pelvic pain.
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  FEATURED COMPANIES
Neuromodulation for OAB symptoms
Incontinence experts discuss the prevalence of refractory OAB and how Urgent® PC can help this undertreated population. To view the supplement:
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Length tension function of puborectalis muscle: Implications for the treatment of fecal incontinence and pelvic floor disorders
Journal of Neurogastroenterology and Motillity via PubMed
External anal sphincter and puborectalis muscle play important role in anal continence function. Based on length-tension measurement, we recently reported that the human EAS muscle operates at short sarcomere length under physiological conditions. Goal of our study was to determine if PRM also operates at the short sarcomere length.
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Transvaginal single-incision mesh reconstruction for recurrent or advanced anterior vaginal wall prolapse
Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics via Springer
Data were collected retrospectively for preoperative parameters and at follow-up visits. Anatomical cure was assessed with vaginal examination using the ICS-POP-Q system; introital-ultrasound scan for postvoidal residual and description of mesh characteristics was performed. We applied a visual analogue scale and the German Pelvic Floor Questionnaire to assess quality-of-life.
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Pelvic floor muscle strength screening and analysis of its related factors among migrant women in the Pearl River Delta
PubMed
A total of 1008 migrant women in hospitals of Guangzhou and Foshan were screened for pelvic floor strength at 42 days postpartum from Oct 2013 to July 2014. EMG biofeedback equipment was employed to assess the strength of type I and II muscle fiber and a questionnaire was designed to record its related factors.
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First Presidential Blog
AUGS
I am very excited about taking over the AUGS Presidency from Dr. Charles Nager. His year was filled with accomplishments including advocating for members in areas of guidelines development, patient privacy issues, and the launch of our Pelvic Floor Disorders Registry. These are very big shoes to fill. Fortunately I have big feet! It is my honor to serve you this next year and I wanted to highlight recent developments and what you can expect later this year.

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ACS/AUGS Year 2015 Scholarship
AUGS
The American College of Surgeons and the American Urogynecologic Society are pleased to announce a shared scholarship open to U.S. members in good standing of both organizations. This scholarship supports attendance and participation in the "Executive Leadership Program in Health Policy and Management," which will take place May 31-June 6, 2015 at Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts. Additional details are available on the Brandeis University website.

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Endo reaches deal to end remaining US lawsuits over mesh
Reuters
Endo International Plc said it had reached agreements to settle up to 20,000 legal claims from women who said they were harmed by transvaginal mesh devices, ending nearly all of the U.S. cases against it and its American Medical Systems unit. Endo, which did not admit liability, said it would increase the amount of money it had set aside to cover vaginal mesh claims from $1.2 billion to approximately $1.6 billion in connection with the latest agreements.

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The interaction of stress and urgency urinary incontinence and its effect on quality of life
International Urogynecology Journal via PubMed
We used data from the General Longitudinal Overactive Bladder Evaluation-UI study in women. Stress and urgency UI symptom severity scores ranged from 0 to 8. We used logistic regression to test the relation among different severity levels of stress and urgency UI, and their interaction with the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire. This was categorized according to percentage ranges as 0-40 percent, 41-80 percent, and 81-100 percent.
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FPMRS NEWSBRIEFS


Medtronic verify system to identify incontinence patients eligible for sacral neurostimulation
MedGadget
Urinary incontinence is an awkward and frustrating condition that people of all age groups can suffer from. There are some therapies in existence that can help deal with the condition, but choosing which route to take can be hit or miss. A popular solution that recently came to market involves using a neurostimulator to target the sacral nerves, which in turn contracts muscles within the pelvic floor. The thing is that the procedure doesn't work for everyone and finding out that you're not eligible only after an implantation can be seriously disappointing.
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FPMRS News

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Caitlin McNeely, Senior Editor, 469.420.2692  
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