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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit    January 26, 2015



 

More nurses may mean fewer deaths in ICU
MedPage Today
A high nurse to patient ratio in intensive care units was independently associated with a lower risk of in-hospital death, according to results from a study involving more than a thousand ICUs in 75 countries. An analysis of data from the EPIC II study showed a nurse to patient ratio of more than 1:1.5 in the ICU was associated with lower in-hospital death compared with a 1:2 ratio, reported Ruth Kleinpell Ph.D., RN, from Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, and colleagues at the Society of Critical Care Medicine meeting. The results also were published in Critical Care Medicine.
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AzNA NEWS & EVENTS


Chapter 30 Members Meeting
Monday, March 9, 2015
5-7 p.m.
Banner Desert Medical Center, Mesa, AZ
Rosati Education Center, Aspen A Classroom
Spend an evening with your nurse colleagues and rekindle your passion! Join in viewing The American Nurse Project documentary (1CEU). We will also be raffling a copy of the newly revised ANA Code of Ethics for Nurses. Please RSVP to aznachapter30@gmail.com

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AzNA Chapter 2 Tucson Presents Nurses of the Future
Friday, March 6, 2015, 0800-1600
Lodge on the Desert, 306 N Alvernon Way, Tucson
    Topics:
  • Documentation & Safe Nursing Practice
  • Nurse Fatigue
  • The Affordable Care Act
Registration Information

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Arizona Immunization Program
Keep current on state and local immunization issues through the new Immunications newsletter.
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UPCOMING EVENTS
Mark your calendars for upcoming AzNA events.

Date Event Location
Feb. 11, 2015
Nurses Lobby Day Az State Capitol
March 4, 2015APRN Lobby Day Az State Capitol
May 1, 2015
Promise of Nursing The Arizona Biltmore


PUBLIC POLICY


Fast Action on Civics Test Bill: A New Benchmark
Passage of HB2064 complete with the Governor’s signature in four days at the start of the session has revealed that this Legislature can get something done quickly. Most bills take much longer to pass, with few ever making it to the Governor’s desk. Contrary to what some are suggesting, there were public hearings. You can watch the video of the 100 minute public hearing of the House Government and Higher Education Committee and know that there were objections to the bill, some by legislators and teachers who wanted to know how the extra testing would be funded. Comprehensive information on activities at the State House including bills, and legislators can always be found on line at the Arizona Legislative Information System website here: ALIS.
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The Governor's Budget
For the first time, an AZ Governor’s budget proposal was announced digitally instead of on paper. You can read it yourself HERE. As anticipated, Governor Ducey proposed a 3 per-cent reduction in payments to AHCCCS health care providers. These cuts may further reduce the number of providers willing to accept AHCCCS patients. But for the moment, his proposal has been met with quiet responses that recognize that there is a very large budget deficit and that he is attacking it by keeping his promise to reduce expenses rather than raise taxes. Everybody is going to hurt. Let the games begin.
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25 Nurses, 38 Bills, 114 Reviews
Denise Link, Ph.D., NP, FAAN, FAANP, Chair of the AzNA Public Policy committee and Rory Hays, JD, AzNA lobbyist have begun the complex process of selecting bills which may affect the nursing community and assigning those bills to members of the public policy committee. Members have three days to review the bills and write brief reports summarizing the bill, commenting on the impact to nurses, addressing the relationship of the bill to the AzNA Public Policy agenda and suggesting a position: Support, Oppose or Monitor. At least three members must review each bill. Those reports, from diverse members, sometimes have different suggestions for the position that AzNA should take. Currently the reports are being reviewed by Denise and Rory. Very soon “Bills: The Nurses List” will be posted on the AzNA website.
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Hope to see you in Pheonix soon!
LOBBY DAY is Feb. 11

APRN LOBBY DAY is March 4

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EDUCATIONAL EVENTS & RESEARCH


Survey Responses Still Needed
If you are a nurse who documents and interacts regularly with an Electronic Health Record as part of your daily work, we want to hear from you! Our research study, “Investigating Nurses’ Experiences with Unintended Consequences of Electronic Health Records (EHRs)” is seeking to test a survey we developed and better describe nurse experience with the benefits and challenges of Electronic Health Records.

Click on the link below to participate in our research study. The survey will take approximately 20 minutes to complete. The first section is the consent, followed by demographics, and then the actual survey.

Your participation in this research will remain confidential.

Click on the link to participate: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/MSBW59B

An Institutional Review Board responsible for human subjects research at The University of Arizona reviewed this research project and found it to be acceptable, according to applicable state and federal regulations and University policies designed to protect the rights and welfare of participants in research.

Thank you,
Jane M. Carrington, Ph.D., RN and Sheila Gephart, Ph.D., RN

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Nicotine Dependence Treatment CE and Certification Program
When:
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day
Individual events on each day, Feb. 12-14, 2015
Where:
University of Arizona, Campus Recreation Center North Conference Room
1400 E Sixth Street
Tucson, Arizona 85721
Contact:
Renee Sayre
sayrer@email.arizona.edu
Phone: 520-626-9344

Download the Registration Form or Visit the University of Arizona HealthCare Partnership website for more information

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2nd Annual Case Management Conference
The ACMA AZ Chapter invites you to join us on Feb. 21, 2015 for a day of education and networking in Scottsdale, AZ. Earn 5.25 CEUs and whiling gaining insight from the following line-up of speakers:

  • Eric Coleman,M.D. — High-Quality Transitional Care Efficiency
  • Barb Averyt, BSHA — CMS and QIO Focus for Care Coordination Across the Continuum of Care
  • Jason Bezozo, Sr. Director Government Relations — ACA, Health Insurance Market Place, Medicaid Expansion
  • Bridget Bonsall Stielger, DO — Palliative Medicine At the Forefront of Medical Care
  • Jill Logan, RN — Ethics and Patient Who Lack Capacity
Click here to see details and register. Early registration ends Jan. 30. Discounted registration rates offered to students.

We look forward to seeing you in February!

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Your input may still be needed — Respond to a survey
As a valued member of the Arizona Nurses Association (AzNA), you are invited to participate in a research study being conducted by a Barrett Honors Nursing student from Arizona State University. The survey will explore the level and type of public policy involvement among registered nurses (RN) who are members of AzNA. Furthermore, the study aims to identify the knowledge base and motivation of nurses and their involvement in public policy as well as the barriers and benefits.

For this study, we ask that you complete the electronic survey below by January 31st.The survey should take 10 to 15 minutes to complete. Responses will remain anonymous.

Survey Link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/MP7JWXR

Participating in this study is voluntary and you are free to withdraw your participation from this study at any time. However, by completing and submitting this survey, you are indicating your consent to participate in the research study.

If you have any questions regarding the survey or this research project in general, please feel free to contact us at mchartm1@asu.edu

Your participation is appreciated!
Thank you to those of you who have already participated in the study!

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Health Surveillance Alert for Super Bowl XLIX
Due to the large influx of participants expected to attend the 2015 Super Bowl and other related events, the Maricopa County Department of Public Health (MCDPH) will be conducting enhanced surveillance beginning on Thursday Jan. 22, 2015 and running through Friday, Feb. 6, 2015.
Read More.

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IN THE NEWS


The medical world is changing — How can we keep up?
By Joan Spitrey
Healthcare is a dynamic industry. It is constantly changing as new modalities, treatments and technologies are discovered or even rebutted. Even with the changes in technology, diagnostics and treatments, the healthcare environment has stayed relatively static. The patient seeks treatment, and the healthcare provider treats based on the needs of the patient. The provider of care bills for services and is paid. For the most part, the healthcare providers have wielded most of the control with little resistance. However, this is changing, and the power has shifted.
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Study finds need for more socialization for students in online PhD nursing programs
Nurse.com
New research suggests faculty need to do more to promote student-faculty interactions and preparation in scholarly activities for students enrolled in online Ph.D. nursing programs. “Professional Socialization of Students Enrolled in an Online Doctor of Philosophy Program in Nursing” by Linda M. Goodfellow, Ph.D., RN, associate professor at Duquesne University School of Nursing in Pittsburgh, studied the extent of professional socialization of students enrolled in an online research-focused Ph.D. program in nursing.
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Clean hands save lives: A vigilance that must never falter
By Christina Thielst
Hand washing in healthcare has long been associated with preventing the spread of disease, but frequent hand washing has its challenges. In the early 2000s, the recipe for alcohol-based hand rubs (gels) was perfected — offering a more efficient, portable and worker-friendly alternative. Since then, these hand sanitizing gels have been promoted for controlling the spread of nosocomial influenza and infections around the world. Today it isn't uncommon to also find infection control stations containing sanitizing gel with other personal protective equipment (PPE) in public areas.
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Pediatric flu: One size does not fit all
MedPage Today
Flu season is in full swing. By now, you've probably seen droves of patients with flu-like symptoms. But did those patients really have the flu? Of course, you know what the flu looks like: Patients come in with the abrupt onset of fever, myalgias, headaches, malaise, coughs, sore throats, and runny noses. Some may have nausea and vomiting. But plenty of other respiratory viruses can present in the same way. And some patients do not come into your emergency department replete with this spectrum of complaints.
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Nurse Mandi Day: Lighter and faster with simulation
By Amanda Morrow and Joshua P.M. Walters
The VA Roseburg Healthcare System's (VARHS) Nurse Mandi Day (NMD) event has traditionally been the educational model for assuring nursing personnel's technical competency. In its design, NMD is an opportunity for nursing personnel to participate annually in activities involving sustainment of healthcare skills and development of critical thinking. NMD previously utilized poster board presentations, written tests of the nursing staff's knowledge of critical skills and informational videos — but little in the way of interactive learning.
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Researchers make breakthrough on new anesthetics
EndoNurse
For the first time since the 1970s, researchers are on the verge of developing a new class of anesthetics. According to a study published in the February issue of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA), a new approach to identifying compounds may lead to the next generation of anesthetics. “While physician anesthesiologists have improved the safety of anesthesia over the years, there are still many risks associated with general anesthesia.
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New healthcare price study hides the true cost of care
By Dr. Jonathan Kaplan
A recent Reuters article discusses the huge disparity in prices for common surgical procedures such as hip and knee replacement. The article highlights a study by Blue Cross Blue Shield that is self-serving to say the least. It points out how doctors and insurers charge high prices for these procedures and, depending on the facility, prices can fluctuate by up to 300 percent.
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Expert panel develops tool to reduce costly catheter-associated urinary tract infections during hospital stays
ANA
ANA is spearheading an initiative to reduce catheter–associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) — one of the most common and costly infections contracted by patients in hospitals — through an assessment and decision-making tool registered nurses and other clinicians can use at the bedside to determine the best way to provide care.
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EHRs don't do enough for care coordination, docs say
Health IT Analytics
Trying to improve patient care coordination and clinical communication through current EHR systems is frustrating and difficult, according to the majority of physicians in a new Spyglass Consulting Group survey, and healthcare organizations are making it worse by not investing adequately in health IT infrastructure. As patient-centered and team-based care begin to demand more from staff members and technology alike, organizational leaders must focus on EHR interoperability, health information exchange, and improved data governance structures that foster an environment of simple and secure communication.
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Has measles begun a triumphant return?
Popular Science
It’s become a common refrain for any champion. As soon as you win the prize, a camera is there to hear the joyful refrain, “I’m going to Disneyland!” The carefully thought-out marketing ploy has since become an analogy to reflect triumph in any arena. But the most recent visitor may have signaled a most unwanted victory.
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CDC: Some hospital super bugs losing their power
Infectious Disease Special Edition
Overall health care–associated (HCA) infections in acute care hospitals have decreased nationally, including a 10 percent decrease in Clostridium difficile infections and an 8 percent decrease in methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia between 2012 and 2013, according to a new report. Although the news is good for patients, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said that most C. difficile and MRSA infections are community acquired or are diagnosed in health care settings other than acute care hospitals.
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Antimicrobial wipes in ICUs don't reduce HAIs, study says
Health Leaders Media
The use of high-cost antiseptic washcloths on ICU patients results in no statistically significant difference in rates of infection for four hospital-acquired infections, researchers find. Bathing hospital ICU patients daily with disposable washcloths containing chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG), doesn't prevent four types of hospital-acquired infections any more than bathing patients without the antimicrobial cloths, researchers say.
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Empathy levels among healthcare professionals
By Dr. Afsaneh Motamed-Khorasani
There is plenty of recent evidence suggesting that empathy could improve clinical outcomes. Empathy has been defined as the ability to stand in the shoes of another and look at the situation from someone else's view. In the healthcare discipline, researchers define empathy as "a predominantly cognitive attribute that involves an understanding of the patient's experiences, concerns and perspectives, combined with a capacity to communicate this understanding and intention to help."
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Depression can be treated effectively in primary care
Medscape (free login required)
Many patients with depressive disorders can be effectively treated with psychological interventions in a primary care setting, according to a pair of systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Reviewing data on more than 5000 primary care patients treated for depression, investigators found that a variety of face-to-face and remote interventions were comparably effective at improving scores on validated depression scales.
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Studies: Long hours, shift work can be detrimental to health
By Denise A. Valenti
"Workin' 9 to 5, what a way to make a livin'. Barely gettin' by, it's all takin' and no givin' ..." Dolly Parton's popular song "9 to 5" from 1980 lamented the difficulties and stress associated with having a traditional workday. But, an eight-hour day of working 9-to-5 really is not that bad — especially for your health. Several recent studies show the impact of work hours on health is related to the number of hours that are worked and also what time of day the work occurs. An analysis in The Lancet showed that longer working hours for those in lower socioeconomic groups has been associated with a higher risk of Type 2 diabetes.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    FDA grants waiver for 15-minute flu test (Becker's Infection Control & Clinical Quality)
Nurse coaching on the rise (By Keith Carlson)
Newly discovered antibiotic kills pathogens without resistance (Feedstuffs)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 



AzNA Today

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169   
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