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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit    March 23, 2015



 



Nursing workforce continues to grow, but profession's future is uncertain
U.S. News & World Report
The number of nursing school graduates entering the workforce has grown significantly over the past 15 years, but health care professionals say not to worry: The jobs will be there over the next decade. Changes in the economy and the retirement of hundreds of thousands of baby boomers will contribute to a growing number of available nursing jobs, they say. “We so badly need and want to have more nurses,” said Nancy Griffin, associate dean of enrollment management at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing in Baltimore.
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AzNA NEWS & EVENTS


ANA applauds appointment of Mary Wakefield as Acting Deputy Secretary of US Department of Health and Human Services
The American Nurses Association (ANA) applauds the appointment of Mary Wakefield, PhD, RN, FAAN, as acting deputy secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Wakefield, a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing, currently serves as the administrator of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), an HHS agency.

“Mary is an exceptional nurse leader whose expertise will enhance HHS efforts to protect the health of all Americans and provide essential health care services,” said ANA President Pamela F. Cipriano, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN. “In making this appointment, we applaud Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell for recognizing the outstanding job Mary has done at HRSA in expanding and improving services for the uninsured and underrepresented.”

Wakefield was appointed HRSA administrator in 2009. Previously, she served as the associate dean for rural health at the University of North Dakota’s School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

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UPCOMING EVENTS
Mark your calendars for upcoming AzNA events.

Date Event Location
May 1
Promise of Nursing The Arizona Biltmore
July 25-2627th Annual Southwestern Regional Nurse Practitioner Clinical Symposium – SAVE THE DATE! Registration Opens in April 2015 Flagstaff, Arizona
Sept. 23-25
AzNA Biennial Convention — The Changing Landscape of Healthcare: Trends in Nursing Leadership, Practice & Education – DATE CHANGE! MARK YOUR CALENDAR! San Marcos Resort, Chandler, Arizona


PUBLIC POLICY


Transformational legislation: HB2645 laboratory testing without an order
A bill, HB2645 laboratory testing without an order was heard on Feb. 17, the last day that the Health Committee could hear new bills. Elizabeth Holmes, CEO of THERANOS, a lab company, testified in favor of expanding citizen access to lab testing without an order. The bill has passed the entire House and all Senate committees without a single “No” vote. It is ready for a vote in the Senate. AzNA worked to ensure that the language was “provider neutral” and supports the bill. If you want to know more about this move to transform health care as we know it follow these links: Testimony by Ms. Holmes this is 15 minutes into the meeting and lasts for 45 minutes. The bill HB2645. The Senate Fact Sheet describes the history of lab testing without an order and provisions of the bill. Latest information on the status of the bill is HERE.
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Once again a bill to allow APRNs to sign home healthcare orders awaits
ANA announces the Introduction of the HR1342 Home Health Care Planning and Improvement Act. The matching bill in the Senate is S578 This legislation recognizes an APRNs’ ability to sign home health care plans for Medicare Patients. Denise G. Link, Ph.D., NP, FAAN, chairs the AzNA Public Policy. She reports that in the last several sessions when the bill has been introduced, only ONE AZ federal House member (Grijalva) signed on. NO AZ federal Senators. This year none of the 21 co-sponsors of the two bills are from Arizona. There needs to be a critical mass of co-sponsors so that the bill will be heard. Please spread the word and get friends, relatives, colleagues, and students to write their leaders in Washington and urge them to sign on as a co-sponsor. AANP has a pre-written letter template to use for emailing or submit a similar pre-made email through the ANA website. You can see the bill and information on co-sponsors by googling HR1342 or U.S. Senate bill S578.
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EDUCATIONAL EVENTS & RESEARCH


National Student Nurses Association Invites AzNA Members to Attend Annual NSNA National Conference
The National Student Nurses Association has invited AzNA members to attend their 63rd annual convention being held this spring in Phoenix at the Phoenix Convention Center on April 8-12, 2015. NSNA has extended an invitation to AzNA members to attend as a guest. “NSNA anticipates that 3000 nursing students from around the country will attend the convention. In addition, nursing leaders, faculty, and special guest will be present” including a plenary session on Friday morning (4/10) on ethics with Pam Cipriano, ANA president, as the moderator.

NSNA invites all AZNA Members to attend the event as guests. A Name Badge will be issued enabling the member to attend any session throughout the week. ANA will also have an exhibit booth that will proviee information about AzNA.

For those interested in attending, please contact Judith Tyler, Ma, RN at 714.210.0705 x 106 or Judith@nsna.org.

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National Pediatric Disaster Coalition Conference in Scottsdale, Nov. 2-4
The first conference of its type, the National Pediatric Disaster Coalition Conference has been planned by pediatric leaders from FEMA, the CDC, Homeland Security, Stanford, Health and Human Services (multiple departments), Save the Children, the Center for Missing and Exploited Children, the Arizona Department of Health Services, and more. Speakers will be coming in to share experiences/lessons learned from the Oslo and Sandy Hook shootings, the Asiana plane crash, and a number of tornados, to mention just a few.

Click here to see the event flyer.
Click here to see the Conference Agenda.

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Nicotine Dependence Treatment Continuing Education & Certification Program
The University of Arizona Healthcare Partnership is pleased to announce a two-day CE and Certification Program addressing treatment of Nicotine Dependence.
Thursday June 4: Treatment Specialist for Nicotine Dependence Certification
Friday June 5: INSTRUCTOR Treatment Specialist for Nicotine Dependence Certification
For more information please click here.

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2015 Leadership in Action Award Nominations
Are you a registered nurse or do you know a registered nurse who demonstrates leadership in: clinical practice, education and teaching, administrative leadership, research, writing, publishing, policy involvement or healthcare innovation?
We want to recognize you and the contribution that you are making to help lead the future of nursing in Arizona, through Arizona’s Nursing “Leadership in Action” awards.
For more information and nomination forms please click here.

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Esophageal Disease Symposium: An Update on Barrett's Esophagus and Esophageal Cancer
Friday, April 10 — 1-5 p.m.
St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center
350 W. Thomas Rd, Phoenix, AZ 85013
For more information or to register please call 1.877.602.4111

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Holistic Nursing Certification Preparation 'West meets East: Merging Best Practices'
Weekend April 11 & 12 — 7:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
PIHMA Acupuncture College & Clinic
301 E. Bethany Home Rd., Ste, A-230, Room E
Seminar Fee: $325.00

Click here to register
Limited seating

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Celebrate National Volunteer Month by giving blood with the Red Cross
During April and in conjunction with National Volunteer Month, the American Red Cross salutes the thousands of volunteers who help fulfill its lifesaving mission and encourages others to join their ranks as volunteer blood donors. You can be among those making a difference by reminding the public that volunteer donors are the only source of blood for patients in need of transfusions. Read more about upcoming blood donation opportunities in your community.
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Educational Opportunity for Nurses: Patient Flow Summit
In its 8th year, the annual Patient Flow Summit brings together nurses, hospital administrators, and other healthcare professionals who are focused on improving hospital operations and the quality of patient care. Leaders from hospitals across the country will present on a variety of topics such as readmission reduction, capacity management, and population health. This year's event will be at the beautiful JW Marriott resort in Las Vegas, May 4-7.

This year, J. Celeste Kallenborn, RN, BSN, Vice President of Acute Care Services at Tampa General Hospital, will discuss how ED process redesign improved patient flow there. And Emily Lowder, Ph.D, RN, Director of Patient Logistics at University of Chicago Medicine, will talk about how discharge process reengineering has enhanced patient throughput. These are just a couple of the many outstanding presentations planned for this year.

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IN THE NEWS


EMR systems generating a new set of problems for nurses
By Joan Spitrey
One of the biggest proposed purposes and benefits of the electronic medical record (EMR) was improved patient care and safety. Gone would be the days of "team reading" of illegible doctor's orders — now prescriber orders would be entered directly into the record, removing errors from handwriting and transcription. Gone would be the days of reading data to providers over the phone — now they would have remote, instant access to patient's records. In fact, the patient would now have instant access also, sometimes even before the healthcare provider has had a change to review the EMR.
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New guidelines call for no heart tests for low-risk patients
HealthDay News
Many patients who are at low risk for heart problems don't need to have screening tests such as EKGs and stress tests, a national association of primary care physicians recommends. The new guideline jibes with research that has suggested the tests are overused in patients who don't need them. At issue are electrocardiography (EKG or ECG), echocardiography (echo) and myocardial perfusion imaging (nuclear) tests.
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Telehealth's true success starts behind the scenes
By Karen R. Thomas
For the last few years, telehealth has been one of the biggest buzzwords in the healthcare industry. With recent predictions indicating that the number of patients using telehealth will hit 7 million by the year 2018, businesses are scrambling to create devices that can keep up with the high demand. Telemonitoring technologies make it possible for healthcare providers to monitor symptoms and measure vital signs remotely, and they also make it easier for patients, employees and others to manage their own healthcare better and more affordably.
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Healthy care environment also benefits patients, families
The Missoulian
Many of us spend more than one-third of our waking hours at our jobs. Therefore, it is no surprise that our work environment has a significant impact on our lives. Nurses are certainly no exception to this. In fact, there has been an abundance of research in recent years analyzing the effects of a healthy work environment on nurses and on the clients they serve. For nurses, a healthy work environment correlates with improved physical and mental health, positive relationships, and positive perception of work-life balance.
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Researchers engineer stem cells to treat sickle cell disease
By Lynn Hetzler
Researchers at Johns Hopkins have taken an important step toward a more effective treatment for some patients with sickle cell disease who require frequent transfusions. In the study, which appeared in the journal Stem Cells, researchers say they have successfully corrected a genetic error in stem cells in these patients, then used those cells to grow mature red blood cells free from the genetic defect that causes sickle cell disease.
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Vitamin D ineffective as treatment for hypertension
Medical News Today
A new study has concluded that vitamin D supplementation is ineffective in lowering blood pressure and should not be used as an antihypertensive agent. The findings refute suggestions that the vitamin could be used as treatment for elevated blood pressure. The study, published in JAMA Internal Medicine, is a systematic review of trials and patient data, including randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials using vitamin D supplementation.
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2 commonly used antibiotics have similar cure rates for uncomplicated skin infections
Infection Control Today
Two antibiotics frequently prescribed to treat serious skin infections — clindamycin and trimethoprim sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) — had similar rates of success in curing uncomplicated infections in outpatients, according to a study published today in The New England Journal of Medicine. Before this pivotal trial, there were no data on which antibiotics were best for treatment of these common skin infections. The large clinical trial is the first to compare the relative effectiveness of the two most commonly prescribed antibiotics for serious skin infections.
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Early X-rays might not help elderly with new back pain
Reuters
Older people with a new episode of back pain shouldn't be sent right away for X-rays or other imaging studies, new research suggests. They won't be any better off, and they'll end up with bigger bills, the researchers say. Guidelines suggest that young people with new back pain should wait a while before getting X-rays, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT), but the same guidelines make exceptions for older people since there could be more serious underlying conditions.
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Possible HIV cure brings hope to patients and healthcare providers
By Christina Thielst
The first AIDS case recognized at the time in the United States was reported to the CDC in April of 1980. Today, more than 1 million Americans are living with HIV/AIDS, and many more are inflicted across the world. A diagnosis of AIDS in '80s usually resulted in death. In the mid-to-late 1980s, testing was developed to slow the spread of the disease by more quickly identifying the carriers and to protect those who relied upon the nation's blood supply.
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Study: Millions of kidney failure patients die for lack of treatment
HealthDay News
More than 2 million kidney failure patients worldwide die prematurely every year because they can't get treatment, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed data from 123 countries with 93 percent of the world's population, and found there were between 5 million to almost 10 million kidney failure patients who required either dialysis or a kidney transplant in 2010. Of the 2.6 million patients who were treated, 78 percent received dialysis. Of those who received treatment, nearly 93 percent lived in high- to high-middle-income nations, the findings showed.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    When screening tests turn healthy people into patients (Medical News Today)
What does the future hold for Nina Pham? (By Joan Spitrey)
A new vaccine targets more HPV strains (The New York Times)
Healthcare providers, patients scramble ahead of high court Obamacare decision (Reuters)
Chronic care management: 4 steps to implementation (FiercePracticeManagement)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.

 



AzNA Today

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169   
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