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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit    March 30, 2015



 



Promoting nurse resilience
By Keith Carlson
Nurses face daily situations that can powerfully challenge their personal and professional resilience. Compromised nurse resilience is one factor that contributes to nurse burnout, compassion fatigue, absenteeism and, ultimately, attrition from the profession. Resilience is not a luxury for nurses, and the forward-thinking nurse manager will monitor the nurses under her charge for signs of weakening resilience.
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NATIONAL NEWS


House Medicare Bill Includes RNs in Incentive Program, DME Orders
Medicare Bill Passed by House Would Seek Expanded Use of Nurses’ Services
APRNs Would Gain Ability to Order Medical Equipment after Meeting with Patient

American Nurses Association – A bill passed by the U.S. House March 26 would alter the Medicare payment system to provide incentives for quality, efficiency and innovation, and would include certain registered nurses as part of the incentive payment program. The bill also would include certain nurses under health care provider eligibility requirements for prescription orders of durable medical equipment for Medicare patients. Read full press release.

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Experiences of CDC and Emory Healthcare in Managing Persons Under Investigation for Ebola: Free Webinar
Date: Tuesday, March 31, 2015
Time: 2:00 - 3:00 p.m. (Eastern Time)
Click here for more information.

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MISSED AN ISSUE OF THE AZNA TODAY?
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UPCOMING EVENTS
Mark your calendars for upcoming AzNA events.

Date Event Location
May 1
Promise of Nursing The Arizona Biltmore
July 25-2627th Annual Southwestern Regional Nurse Practitioner Clinical Symposium – SAVE THE DATE! Registration Opens in April 2015 Flagstaff, Arizona
Sept. 23-25
AzNA Biennial Convention — The Changing Landscape of Healthcare: Trends in Nursing Leadership, Practice & Education – DATE CHANGE! MARK YOUR CALENDAR! San Marcos Resort, Chandler, Arizona




PUBLIC POLICY


RN license fees & financial stability of Arizona Board of Nursing at risk
Urge your Senator to Vote Yes on HB 1296 by pressing the TAKE ACTION NOW button on AzNA’s engage page to target YOUR Senator with a letters from an RN constituent. Don’t forget to put “RN “ beside your name in the letter. A description of the reasons to support this bill can be found there as well as a letter to send automatically. As of last Thursday, the bill was still waiting for a final vote in the Senate. HB 2196 would continue the feeless system required by the Federal Government by operating a basic nurse assistant registry for CNAs (“Certified Nursing Assistant”). It also will provide a fee-based licensing option LNA (“Licensed Nursing Assistant”) to nurse aides who wish to pay a fee for a license that will expand their employment opportunities and allow them to become Medication Assistants
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EDUCATIONAL EVENTS & RESEARCH


Survey Response Requested
The University of Nevada School of Medicine has been approved by the Office of Human Research Protection to conduct a research survey investigating endoscopy nurses' and technicians’ perceptions of procedure quality. The study is lead by Christian Stone, M.D., M.P.H., Chief of the Division of Gastroenterology at UNSOM.

Participation in this study is voluntary and data will be collected anonymously.
  • You may choose not to answer a question
  • You may stop filling out the survey at any point
After completion of the survey, you may enter the random drawing to win an Apple iPad Mini.

By completing this questionnaire, you verify that:
  • You have understood the purpose of this survey;
  • You have voluntarily agreed to participate; and
  • You are at least 18 years of age.
The survey will take approximately 5 minutes to complete.

To proceed to the survey, please click this link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/L7QDDKK

Thank you for your feedback and interest. We appreciate your cooperation and time. We plan to use the results to improve patient care.

If you have questions or comments regarding this research, please contact Kirtan Patel, MSIV at 702-671-2345 or kirtanp@medicine.nevada.edu

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2nd Annual Arizona Hospital and Healthcare Association Care Improvement Symposium on May 15, 2015
The Arizona Hospital and Healthcare Association (AzHHA) will be hosting the Care Improvement Symposium again this year to bring patient safety and quality leaders together to hear from noted national leaders, share best practices and make progress in improving patient safety.

This year's session will focus on leadership and change management strategies to integrate patient safety efforts with industry standards of high-reliability organizations. To truly impact and improve patient care, hospital must make patient safety personal and put patients and families at the center of care.

Be sure to join us for a great experience that will be thought provoking and leave you energized to get to work. More Information.

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CTCAs Annual New Treatments in Oncology Symposium at W Scottsdale, May 1 and May 2
RNs are able to attend for free!

The goal of ANTO is to educate community healthcare providers and translational researchers on the latest developments in oncology. The program is designed for future or currently practicing oncologists, scientists and affiliates interested in clinical cancer development and treatment approaches.

More Information.

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Community Service Opportunity
The Health Unit Coordinator Program at Gateway College is looking for volunteers to serve on its academic advisory committee. As a member of the committee you will provide important input on the training of future healthcare professionals.

Health unit coordinators are also employed under the title of medical secretary, unit clerk, ward clerk, health unit specialist, patient care associate, and similar titles. The program is looking for committee members who are nurse managers, unit trainers, and other health care professionals who supervise and interact with health unit coordinators.

If you are interested please contact Robert Franciosi at:
Robert.franciosi@domail.maricopa.edu
(480) 731-8307

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IN THE NEWS


Preventing domestic violence one step at a time
By Jessica Taylor
Vice President Joe Biden spoke at the National Conference on Health and Domestic Violence recently, and he stated that domestic violence is a public health epidemic. Biden made attendees — including doctors, nurses, social workers, etc. — aware that even though we've come a long way in the fight against domestic violence, we have to keep making sure we're working harder than ever for prevention and intervention. Of course, it takes a little bit of time to recognize domestic violence, and it's important for healthcare professionals to know the signs.
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Nurses say lack of device interoperability contributes to medical errors
Infection Control Today
For years, healthcare technology professionals and patient safety organizations have decried the lack of medical device interoperability in hospitals. Now, another voice, nursing, is echoing the call for better interoperability, saying a lack of sufficient progress on this front contributes significantly to medical errors.
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The role of artificial intelligence in personalized medicine
FierceHealthIT
Scientists at Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh are using artificial intelligence in their quest to provide individualized treatments. As part of the Pittsburgh Health Data Alliance, the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center has agreed to fund the project for six years at between $10 million and $20 million per year. It's taking data from electronic health records, diagnostic imaging, prescriptions, genomic profiles, insurance records and even wearable devices to create healthcare plans not only by disease, but also for specific types of people.
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Using tech to fight kids' obesity
Contemporary Pediatrics
Despite our best efforts, pediatricians have little success in encouraging our patients to eat a healthy diet and get the recommended amount of daily physical exercise. According to 2012 data, more than 31 percent of U.S. children aged 2 to 19 years are either obese or overweight, and more than 80 percent of teenagers do not get the recommended amount of physical activity. Activity meters may hold the key to encouraging our young patients to increase their levels of moderate to vigorous daily exercise. By leveraging technology, pediatricians may be able to improve children's activity levels and begin to achieve reductions in childhood obesity levels.
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Close patient-staff interactions drive MRSA transmission
FierceHealthcare
Close-proximity interactions between patients and hospital staff drove transmission of Staphylococcus aureus in Berck-sur-Mer Hospital, a long-term care facility in France, according to a study published in PLOS Computational Biology. Researchers identified 173 transmission events over four months between 329 patients and 261 healthcare workers, with risk of transmission higher between healthcare workers and patients than from patient to patient. "S. aureus transmission was consistent with contacts defined by electronically collected CPIs, illustrating their potential as a tool to control hospital-acquired infections and help direct surveillance," the authors state.
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FDA approves treatment for inhalation anthrax
U.S. Food and Drug Administration
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Anthrasil, Anthrax Immune Globulin Intravenous (Human), to treat patients with inhalational anthrax in combination with appropriate antibacterial drugs. Inhalational anthrax is a rare disease that can occur after exposure to infected animals or contaminated animal products, or as a result of an intentional release of anthrax spores. It is caused by breathing in the spores of the bacterium Bacillus anthracis. When inhaled, the anthrax bacteria replicate in the body and produce toxins that can cause massive and irreversible tissue injury and death.
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Women dominate nursing field, yet men make more
USA Today
ven in an occupation that women overwhelmingly dominate, they still earn less than men, a study of nurses found. The gender gap for registered nurses' salaries amounts to a little over $5,000 yearly on average and it hasn't budged in more than 20 years. That pay gap may not sound big — it's smaller than in many other professions — but over a long career, it adds up to more than $150,000, said study author Ulrike Muench, a professor and researcher at the University of California, San Francisco.
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Vitamin K speeds hip fracture surgery for patients on warfarin
MedPage Today
Administering vitamin K as a warfarin reversal agent to hip fracture patients shortened time to surgery and improved outcomes, researchers reported. Compared with a small group of patients who did not undergo vitamin K therapy, patients who received vitamin K went into surgery an average of 1.2 days sooner and spent an average 5.1 fewer days in the hospital, according to Thomas Steven Moores, MBBS, at University Hospitals of North Midlands in Stafford, England.
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Influenza B viruses accounted for the largest proportion of circulating flu viruses in recent weeks
Infection Control Today
According to the recent FluView report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, influenza activity continues to decrease, but remains elevated in the United States. While H3N2 viruses have been most common this season, influenza B viruses accounted for the largest proportion of circulating viruses in recent weeks. This week, influenza B viruses accounted for 67 percent of all influenza viruses reported and were predominant in 7 of 10 U.S. regions.
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Affordable Care Act faces more hurdles in coming months
By Rosemary Sparacio
The Affordable Care Act has survived one repeal attempt in the Supreme Court, as well as more than 50 repeal attempts by the House of Representatives and the Senate. However, President Barack Obama's signature legislation faces yet another significant challenge to its existence. In the current case before the Supreme Court (King v. Burwell), a ruling in favor of the plaintiffs this June would essentially cut off the healthcare law's tax credits/subsidies in roughly two-thirds of the states.
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Hypertension cited more often as a factor on death certificates
MedPage Today
Hypertension is increasingly contributing to U.S. mortality, a national death-certificate study showed. Hypertension-related deaths rose a relative 23.1 percent — from 255.1 to 314.1 per 100,000 population from 2000 to 2013 — after adjustment for age, found Hsiang-Ching Kung, PhD, and Jiaquan Xu, MD, both of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics in Hyattsville, Maryland.
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Deep brain stimulation may ease some Parkinson's pain for years
HealthDay News
People with Parkinson's disease who undergo deep brain stimulation may experience long-term pain relief, a small, new study from Korea suggests. However, three-quarters of the patients developed new pain in muscles and joints eight years after the procedure was performed, the researchers found. "It is potentially important that some pain types improved, but also important to understand why other types of pain did not benefit from stimulation," said Michael Okun, MD, national medical director for the National Parkinson Foundation.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

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Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 



AzNA Today

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169   
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