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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit    April 06, 2015



 



Chaos theory helps nurses cope in the emergency room
FierceHealthcare
Expect the unexpected. That's the mission of one nursing school program that teaches students about the chaos theory in order to help them cope with the stress they'll encounter on the job. Elena Capella, assistant professor and director of the online Master in Nursing program at San Francisco's School of Nursing and Health Professions, told The Huffington Post that the chaos theory can help nurses handle the intensity of the emergency room and keep calm in tough situations.
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UPCOMING EVENTS
Mark your calendars for upcoming AzNA events.

Date Event Location
May 1
Promise of Nursing The Arizona Biltmore
July 25-2627th Annual Southwestern Regional Nurse Practitioner Clinical Symposium – SAVE THE DATE! Registration Opens in April 2015 Flagstaff, Arizona
Sept. 23-25
AzNA Biennial Convention — The Changing Landscape of Healthcare: Trends in Nursing Leadership, Practice & Education – DATE CHANGE! MARK YOUR CALENDAR! San Marcos Resort, Chandler, Arizona


PUBLIC POLICY


Sine Die* — Maybe
Expectations that the legislature would adjourn sine die before Easter are real. But if more work must be done, there is a still a good chance they will complete their work before Friday the 10th ending the session in one of the shortest time periods in the last decade. *“sine die” means without any future date being designated (as for resumption) : indefinitely as in “the meeting adjourned sine die.
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36 bills of interest to nurses remain unresolved
Thirty-six bills identified by AzNA as important to you, a nurse, are still alive. Eleven have moved very close to final “yes” votes from either the House or the Senate and a Governor’s signature to live. Please see the latest “Nurses List of Bills” for bills that are left, AzNA’s position and links to in depth information on each bill. Watch your e-mail for ACTION alerts from AzNA if urgent last minute action is needed to save a bill.
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Measles Update
According to ADHS Interim Director Cory Nelson, as of April 1 there are 7 measles cases in AZ. His blog goes on to state that “Arizona seems to have escaped the first round of the national measles outbreak without any more cases, but that doesn’t mean we can drop our guard. Measles is still circulating in the country, especially in nearby states. So parents, nurses, doctors and all healthcare professionals need to consider measles as a possibility when someone has a rash and high fever, runny nose, or red, watery eyes. And, of course, children need to continue getting vaccinated” AzNA Public Policy Agenda: Improve inpatient, outpatient and community-based health and safety.
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IN THE NEWS


Healthcare is a team sport; Nurses are key players
Medscape (free login required)
The documentary Rx: The Quiet Revolution provides a changing perspective on how healthcare should be delivered in this country. It no longer works for any healthcare provider to assess, diagnose, treat, prescribe, and interpret tests without consulting the patient. We have entered into an era that is long overdue, in which we are must create a partnership with patients. Basically, we are putting the "care" back in patient care. One segment of the documentary highlights a "new breed" of physician who has begun to make house calls. Physicians are not the only healthcare providers making house calls. Others — nurse practitioners (NPs) and community health nurses — are also providing home-based healthcare.
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New stroke prevention efforts may be paying off
HealthDay News
Fewer people are being treated in U.S. emergency rooms for strokes caused by blood clots in the brain, which experts read as a sign that current stroke prevention methods are working. The rate of emergency department visits for either a stroke or a mini-stroke (transient ischemic attack) decreased dramatically between 2001 and 2011, according to a new U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report. Such ER visits declined 35 percent for adults 18 and older, and 51 percent for those 55 to 74, said the report from the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics.
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FDA issues draft guidance on abuse-deterrent opioids
U.S. Food and Drug Administration
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a draft guidance document to assist industry in developing new formulations of opioid drugs with abuse-deterrent properties. The document "Guidance for Industry: Abuse-Deterrent Opioids — Evaluation and Labeling," explains the FDA's current thinking about the studies that should be conducted to demonstrate that a given formulation has abuse-deterrent properties, how those studies will be evaluated by the agency and what labeling claims may be approved based on the results of those studies.
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Nurse helps sexual assault survivors heal, move on
The Associated Press via The Washington Times
Linda Walther has been a registered nurse for four decades, but it’s in the past eight years that she’s found her calling: working with survivors of sexual assault. “If I had found that job 20 years ago, I think I would have been able to do so much more in my career as a sexual assault nurse examiner,” Walther said, standing in an exam room at Hennepin County Medical Center. “It’s really my passion and what I love doing.”
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Emergency department burden of constipation in the US from 2006 to 2011
American Journal of Gastroenterology
Although constipation is typically managed in an outpatient setting, there is an increasing trend in the frequency of constipation-related hospital visits. The aim of this study was to analyze trends related to chronic constipation in the United States with respect to emergency department visits, patient and hospital characteristics, and associated costs. Between 2006 and 2011, the frequency of constipation-related ED visits increased by 41.5 percent, from 497,034 visits to 703,391 visits, whereas the mean cost per patient rose by 56.4 percent, from $1,474 in 2006 to $2,306 in 2011.
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Study casts doubt on acetaminophen for low back pain, arthritis
HealthDay News
Acetaminophen — best known as Tylenol in the United States — does not appear to help ease lower back pain and offers little relief for the most common form of arthritis, according to a new report. The review of data from 13 studies could challenge existing recommendations on pain relief, experts say. "These results support the reconsideration of recommendations to use [acetaminophen] for patients" with these conditions, concluded a team led by Gustavo Machado of The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Sydney in Australia.
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Endometriosis is often ignored in teenage girls
The New York Times
An estimated 89 million women worldwide, including 6.5 million in the United States and Canada, have endometriosis, according to the Endometriosis Association, a research and advocacy group. Symptoms can include debilitating periods, painful bowel movements with menstruation, inflammation, internal bleeding, scar tissue and infertility. But those numbers are rough, experts say, because many young girls with endo do not find out until years later. In fact, research from the Endometriosis Association estimates that it can take up to 10 years from the onset of pain for a provider to give a diagnosis of endometriosis.
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Collaboration between nurses and physicians decreases rates of HAIs in critical care
News-Medical
Collaborative relationships between nurses and physicians decrease rates of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) in critical care, according to an article in the April issue of Critical Care Nurse (CCN). The article, "Nurse-Physician Collaboration and Hospital-Acquired Infections in Critical Care," examines the association between nurses' perception of their working relationships with physicians and the rates of two of the most common HAIs.
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Data is no less secure even as HIPAA enforcement is here
By Lindy Benton
The headlines are endless and ever-growing: Healthcare data is at risk. Exposure is happening because a scourge of people worldwide is illegally trying to benefit from the information; because of improper protection of sensitive information; or because of some other sort of breach. However, despite continued efforts to address security loopholes across the sector, simply "taking action" to mitigate damage is not an effective strategy, and it won't work long term.
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FDA strengthens warnings about allergic reactions with anemia drug
U.S. Food and Drug Administration
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is strengthening an existing warning that serious, potentially fatal allergic reactions can occur with the anemia drug Feraheme (ferumoxytol). The FDA has changed the prescribing instructions and approved a Boxed Warning, FDA's strongest type of warning, regarding these serious risks. Also added is a new Contraindication, a strong recommendation against use of Feraheme in patients who have had an allergic reaction to any IV iron replacement product.
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Novel outbreak enterovirus D68 strain associated with acute flaccid myelitis cases in the US
The Lancet
A new strain of the polio-like EV-D68 could be the cause of muscle weakness that's affected more than 100 kids across the United States, researchers reported this week. They say they've found evidence that these findings strengthen the finding that the virus caused the polio-like syndrome, but say it appears to be clinically rare and might have to do with the genetic makeup of the patients.
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CNOs remain uncertain about DNP-prepared nurses
HealthLeaders Media
In 2004, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing released a position statement recommending that "entry into practice" education for advanced practice nurses be raised from a master's degree to the doctoral level by 2015. Nurses with practice doctorates were rare at that time. According to AACN data, only three schools offered doctorate of nursing practice programs and there were only seven DNP graduates when the statement was released. Though the 2015 goal hasn't been met — many schools still educate APRNs at the traditional master's level — the number of DNP programs and graduates has increased enormously over the past decade.
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Shape-shifting probe may revolutionize biology and clinical diagnostics
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the National Institutes of Health say they have developed a shape-shifting probe, which is capable of sensitive, high-resolution remote biological sensing that is not possible with current technology. If eventually put into widespread use, the probe, about one-hundredth as wide as a human hair, could have a major impact on research in medicine, chemistry and biology and might be used in clinical diagnostics, according to the scientists.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Nursing workforce continues to grow, but profession's future is uncertain (U.S. News & World Report)
EMR systems generating a new set of problems for nurses (By Joan Spitrey)
Possible HIV cure brings hope to patients and healthcare providers (By Christina Thielst)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.

 



AzNA Today

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169   
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