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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit    April 20, 2015



 



Medicare payment 'fix' includes key provisions for nurses
ANA
The American Nurses Association (ANA) applauds Senate passage of H.R. 2, the Medicare Access and Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) Reauthorization Act. This legislation protects seniors’ and children’s access to care and repeals the Medicare payment formula used to calculate Medicare payment rates to healthcare providers. H.R. 2, headed to President Obama for signature, includes provisions that enhance nurses’ roles as providers and improve their ability to provide timely services to Medicare beneficiaries.
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AzNA NEWS & EVENTS


Help your Patients Quit Smoking — Phoenix Kicks Butts — April 20-14
AzNA is a proud cosponsor of the Phoenix Kicks Butts Smoking Cessation Awareness Campaign which kicks off today. Included in the campaign are resources to help healthcare professionals provide simple and effective smoking cessation counseling to patients. The Advise the Quite website, developed by Pfizer, includes video training to enable you to provide simple and effective smoking cessation counseling to patients. The video, which features a certified Tobacco Treatment Specialist, provides information on:
  • Why quitting can be challenging for patients: Knowing what their obstacles might be can help you to assist patients in overcoming them
  • How behavioral counseling can help: Treatment and support, combined, can give smokers improved chances of reaching their quit goals
  • How to effectively engage patients: Tactics and tips for connecting with patients on a smoking cessation goal
The site also includes a sample smoking cessation role play between a provider and a patient, as well as links to downloadable resources.

Visit AdviseTheQuit.com/PhoenixKicksButts.com to access the video and tools to support your patients in their quit attempts.

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UPCOMING EVENTS
Mark your calendars for upcoming AzNA events.

Date Event Location
May 1
Promise of Nursing The Arizona Biltmore
July 25-2627th Annual Southwestern Regional Nurse Practitioner Clinical Symposium — REGISTRATION NOW OPEN Flagstaff, Arizona
Sept. 23-25
AzNA Biennial Convention — The Changing Landscape of Healthcare: Trends in Nursing Leadership, Practice & Education – DATE CHANGE! MARK YOUR CALENDAR! San Marcos Resort, Chandler, Arizona


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Calling All RN Night Owls! Land at O.A.S.I.S Hospital

OASIS Hospital, the Valley’s Premier Orthopedic Hospital is seeking talented and knowledgeable RNs to join their world class team! These highly sought after Night Opportunities in the PSU provide autonomy, exceptional rates, a family setting, great schedules, and pure joy. 

Join our team at http://oasishospital.recruiting.com #OASISjobs
 


EDUCATIONAL EVENTS & RESEARCH


Celebrate World Red Cross Day by giving blood
The American Red Cross encourages eligible donors to give blood this May in honor of World Red Cross and Red Crescent Day on May 8 — the birthday of International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement founder, Henry Dunant.

Last year, about 3.1 million volunteer blood donors rolled up a sleeve to help the Red Cross meet the needs of patients at approximately 2,600 hospitals nationwide. Donors of all blood types — especially those with types O negative, A negative and B negative — are needed to help ensure blood is available for patients this spring.

To make an appointment to give blood, download the Red Cross Blood Donor App, visit redcrossblood.org or call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767). Those who are unable to give blood can support blood donations and invite others to make a lifesaving donation by creating a SleevesUp virtual blood drive at redcrossblood.org/SleevesUp.

For blood donation opportunities, read here.

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Invitation to participate in PAID Medical Device Evaluation Study
Participant Requirements:
Respondent must be a licensed: Registered Nurse; Nurse Practitioner; Physician Assistant

20 Healthcare Professionals needed:
(10) HCP participants WITH negative pressure wound therapy device experience
(10) HCP participants WITHOUT have negative pressure wound therapy device experience

Honoraria:
* $115 — RN's
* $160 — NP's and PA's
All participants will be issued an honorarium at the conclusion of their session.

Study Dates and Session Length:
   Monday, May 11 - Thursday, May 14, 2015
   Each one-on-one session will run for approximately 35-45 minutes.

Study Location:
2141 E Broadway Suite 201 Tempe, AZ 85282
p: 480.247.7182

Registration:
To be considered for this study, along with our future studies, we invite you to click here to join the Research Collective Respondent Panel. Qualified respondents will be contacted for further qualification and for scheduling. As this project only requires interviews with 20 HCP’s, if you are not scheduled for this study, please be assured we will contact you to gauge your interest and availability for one of our future studies. Thank You.

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NEWS FROM AROUND THE INDUSTRY


Healthcare is about patients, not paperwork
Forbes
Author Judy Murphy, RN, Chief Nursing Officer, IBM, writes: When you’re in the hospital or recovering at home, what’s the one thing that you want more of? Personal care. Nurses want the same thing. We want to spend more time tending to our patients, giving them more individual care. The challenge today is we end up spending a good chunk of our time tracking and managing care, rather than giving it.
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How telehealth is changing the lives of chronically ill patients
By Karen R. Thomas
Living with a chronic disease isn't just physically taxing; it takes an emotional toll as well. Millions of older Americans live with a chronic illness such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), diabetes or heart disease, and many suffer through their day-to-day care routines alone. For Vickie Stark, a COPD patient who is living on her own, daily life can be incredibly stressful.
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Nurse leadership program helps hospitals cut costs, improve outcomes
FierceHealthcare
Critical care nurses who participated in a 16-month leadership and innovation training program developed initiatives that helped their hospitals save an anticipated $28 million a year and significantly improve clinical outcomes, according to the American Association of Critical Care Nurses (AACN).
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Ear infections common, but often missed, in infants
HealthDay News
Although most babies will have at least one ear infection before they reach the age of 1, the infections can be hard for parents to recognize. Identifying and treating ear infections in babies is important because they can lead to other problems, according to Andrew Hotaling, M.D., a pediatric otolaryngologist at Loyola University Health System in Chicago. "Hearing disorders can lead to impediments in speech development and other growth milestones," Hotaling said in a Loyola news release. "The ear infections are usually located in the middle ear."
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Study: Blood thinners overprescribed for low-risk irregular heartbeat
HealthDay News
As many as one-quarter of people with atrial fibrillation who have a low risk of stroke are given blood-thinning drugs they likely don't need, a new study contends. Atrial fibrillation can cause blood clots. Those blood clots can then travel to the brain and cause a stroke. To prevent this from happening, many people with atrial fibrillation are prescribed blood thinners. However, because the drugs also have a risk of causing excessive bleeding, they generally aren't recommended for people with atrial fibrillation who have the lowest risk for stroke, the study authors explained.
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Researchers recommend HPV vaccine for boys
UPI
The role of the human papillomavirus in spawning higher cervical cancer rates is well documented by the media and medical establishment. But men are almost three times more likely to be diagnosed with HPV-related throat cancer than women. A new study out of Canada suggests the HPV vaccine is just as effective for preventing HPV-caused cancers in men, and should be routinely administered to young boys. In addition to throat cancer, HPV has been shown to cause penile and anal cancers in men.
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Informatics nurses drive significant patient safety and workflow improvements
HIT Consultant
HIMSS released the results of the 2015 Impact of the Informatics Nurse Survey — a survey of nearly 600 participants including C-suite executives, clinical analysts and informatics nurses. The survey examined the growing technology-driven healthcare ecosystem and the role nursing informatics — a specialty that integrates knowledge, data and wisdom — is playing in this evolving environment. The results indicated that the role of informatics nurses has expanded greatly and is having immense impact on patient safety and overall care, as well as notable workflow and productivity improvements.
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Understand what to expect from faculty in online nursing courses
U.S. News & World Report
The nursing field requires employees to balance unusual schedules, communicate with a wide variety of people and adapt to ever-changing professional relationships. They’re the same qualities that generally make for good online nursing instructors, who more than anything need to show flexibility on behalf of their students, nursing educators say. "I think nurses are used to being adaptable," says Carrie Cormack, an instructor and the lead pediatric nurse practitioner faculty at the Medical University of South Carolina. "I think that’s a trait that many nurses share."
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Combine topicals, orals for onychomycosis
Internal Medicine News
Two new topical solutions approved in 2014 for the treatment of distal subungual onychomycosis don't eliminate the need for oral treatment, but they do represent improvement in the options available to patients, according to Boni E. Elewski, MD. Oral treatments, including terbinafine, itraconazole and fluconazole are still of value — either alone or in combination with the new solutions or other agents — for this type of onychomycosis, which is "essentially a nail bed dermatophytosis," Elewski said at the South Beach Symposium.
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Weight loss linked to bone loss in middle aged women
Reuters
Losing weight in middle age may mean losing not just unwanted fat, but also precious bone density, at least for women, a new U.S. study suggests. Regardless of the types of foods or amount of calcium in their diets, middle aged women who lost a moderate amount of weight over a two-year period also lost more bone density than men or younger women. Changes in bone density following moderate weight loss may be sex-specific and influenced by hormones, the study team writes in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Chaos theory helps nurses cope in the emergency room (FierceHealthcare)
CNOs remain uncertain about DNP-prepared nurses (HealthLeaders Media)
Emergency department burden of constipation in the US from 2006 to 2011 (American Journal of Gastroenterology)
Study casts doubt on acetaminophen for low back pain, arthritis (HealthDay News)
FDA issues draft guidance on abuse-deterrent opioids (U.S. Food and Drug Administration)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.

 



AzNA Today

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169   
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