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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit    August 03, 2015



 

When nurses need to be the patient's voice
Health Leaders Media
When Kathleen Turner, RN, BSN, enrolled in nursing school, she intended on becoming a hospice nurse. "My mother had worked for hospice for a long time, and she and I had cared for my grandmother in the last six months of her life," says Turner. "And seeing how those hospice nurses were with my family, that's what I wanted to do." But for her final clinical rotation, Turner's instructor threw her a curveball and assigned her to, of all places, an intensive care unit.
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AzNA NEWS & EVENTS


AzNA Launches New Logos, Mission, and Updated Strategic Goals
You may have noticed some recent changes to the AzNA website, including our new mission statement and unified logos. While AzNA has been the voice for all Arizona nurses for almost 100 years, the association remains flexible enough to adapt to the changing needs and demands of today’s nursing workforce. Watch your inbox for more detailed information about the changes being made and what this means for your role as an AzNA member in the future of nursing in Arizona.

Arizona Nurses Association: Advancing the Nursing Profession and Promoting a Healthy Arizona

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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Calling All RN Night Owls! Land at O.A.S.I.S Hospital

OASIS Hospital, the Valley’s Premier Orthopedic Hospital is seeking talented and knowledgeable RNs to join their world class team! These highly sought after Night Opportunities in the PSU provide autonomy, exceptional rates, a family setting, great schedules, and pure joy. 

Join our team at http://oasishospital.recruiting.com #OASISjobs
 


EDUCATIONAL EVENTS & RESEARCH


Mentoring our Future Nurses: Aug. 8 Workshop Opportunity
Please read about this great opportunity for mentorship to reach Project Goal #6 described below.

The Arizona Action Coalition Diversity Council (AZ ACDC) was created to design and implement Project Goal #6 Diversity of RN Workforce for the Future of Nursing: Arizona Implementation Program.

The AZ ACDC is dedicated to promote a diverse workforce in Arizona through opportunities for mentorship among diverse, bilingual students in community health settings. A pilot mentoring program is in development and will be implemented from August 2015 to May 2016.The Program Goal: To develop a model that can be utilized statewide. A minimum of 20 student/RN dyads will engage in a project with underserved populations.The pilot program has identified 20 students of the Bilingual Nursing Program at Phoenix College as the mentee’s. Mentors are currently being recruited.

Please join us on Aug. 8. For agenda and registration information click here.

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The National Pediatric Disaster Coalition Conference
Children’s needs are often overlooked in disaster planning, but members of the National Pediatric Disaster Coalition Conference Planning Committee aim to reverse that trend by offering education from some of the world’s leading experts in pediatric disaster response. The National Pediatric Disaster Coalition Conference is designed to provide tools, training, resources and information for nurses, physicians, first responders, public health and community planners, hospital administrators, educators and others when it convenes Nov. 2-4 at the Camelback Inn in Scottsdale. A $100 discount on registration is available through Sept. 30.
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UPCOMING EVENTS
Mark your calendars for upcoming AzNA events.

Date Event Location
Aug. 214th Annual Adda Alexander Conference on Patient Safety & Quality
REGISTRATION NOW OPEN
Carefree Resort & Spa, Carefree, AZ
Aug. 282nd Annual National Association of Hispanic Nurses: Phoenix Chapter Conference REGISTRATION NOW OPEN Scottsdale, Arizona
Sept. 23-25
AzNA Biennial Convention — The Changing Landscape of Healthcare: Trends in Nursing Leadership, Practice & Education – REGISTRATION NOW OPEN! San Marcos Resort, Chandler, Arizona


NEWS FROM AROUND THE INDUSTRY


The key to building cohesive nursing teams
By Keith Carlson
Nursing teams have the potential to be dynamic and powerful entities, and creating and maintaining them is a process worthy of considerable attention. Cultivating team spirit and camaraderie among nurses is not something to be left to chance. Having said that, many managers who lack the savvy or willingness to manifest a winning team will often leave the group to its own devices. Work and determination are essential for a team's success, and leadership is a key ingredient.
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Tools for survival as a new NICU nurse
The Huffington Post
Author Lori Boggan, RN, writes: It has been an amazing 11-year journey working as a neonatal nurse. The journey has taken me across the United States and beyond. Being a nurse has enriched and changed my life in so many ways. For that I am eternally grateful. I still recall my first job. I felt like an impostor in my uniform.
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Rehab before cancer treatment can help patients bounce back
NPR
Cancer patients who do rehabilitation before they begin treatment may recover more quickly from surgery, chemotherapy or radiation, some cancer specialists say. But insurance coverage for cancer prehabilitation, as it's called, can be spotty, especially if the aim is to prevent problems rather than treat existing ones.
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CMS answers ICD-10 FAQs for healthcare providers
RevCycle Intelligence
ICD-10 implementation will begin on Oct. 1, 2015, and as such, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and the American Medical Association (AMA) announced that, in order to ease the transition, they will be flexible when filing claims that do not use specific enough codes. On July 27, the organizations released a frequently asked questions list regarding the guidance.
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Nurse leaders can learn management and leadership tips from school head teachers
News-Medical
The drive to improve quality in the education sector is similar to that in health care, and lessons from the schools system are relevant to nursing leadership. Nurse leaders in the can learn management and leadership lessons from school head teachers, according to an article in July's Nursing Management journal. The article suggests that there are relevant and transferable lessons the health service can learn from the education sector for managers at all levels, including heads of nursing, matrons, and executive directors of nursing.
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FDA approves balloon for stomach to treat obesity
The New York Times
The Food and Drug Administration approved an inflatable medical balloon that helps patients lose weight by filling up space in the stomach. The agency cleared the balloon system, manufactured by Reshape Medical, to treat obesity in adults. The balloon is inserted into the stomach using an endoscope and then filled with saline solution. Patients are sedated during the procedure, which takes less than 30 minutes, according to an FDA release. A previous balloon device was withdrawn in 1992 because the balloon could rupture and block patients’ arteries.
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High number of unnecessary CT scans associated with pediatric sports-related head trauma
Medical Xpress
Visits to emergency departments by children with sports-related head injuries have skyrocketed in the past decade, and new research finds that many patients undergo unnecessary computed tomography or CT scans that expose them to radiation and increase the cost of treatment. Fifty-three percent of patients studied received a CT scan, but only four percent of those actually had traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) on their CT scans. The new study was published online in the American Journal of Emergency Medicine.
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University of Southampton study to examine how nurse staffing levels affect care, safety of patients
News-Medical
A University of Southampton study will investigate how the provision of nurses in hospitals affects the care and safety of patients. Funded by the National Institute for Health Research: Health Services and Delivery Research (HS&DR) Programme and working with Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust and the universities of Portsmouth and York, the research will examine the relationship between nurse staffing levels, failure to observe patients' vital signs and possible consequences - such as cardiac arrest calls, unanticipated admission to intensive care and death.
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Ankle injury: Simple rule reduces X-ray use, costs in kids
Medscape (free login required)
It's a win-win: applying the Low Risk Ankle Rule to children who present to the emergency department (ED) with an ankle injury reduces unnecessary X-ray exposure and lowers the cost of care for both patients and providers. "Our findings are good news for the two million American and Canadian children with hurt ankles who visit [EDs] each year: although most currently receive x-rays, many do not actually need them," said Kathy Boutis, M.D., from the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, in a news release.
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Older smokers with migraines may face added stroke risk
HealthDay News
Older smokers who experience migraines appear to be at increased risk of stroke, a new study suggests. The study included nearly 1,300 people, average age 68, who suffered migraine headaches with and without aura. Migraine with aura is a migraine that's preceded or accompanied by visual effects such as flashes of light or blind spots, or by tingling in the hands or face.
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Scientists believe they may have found an Ebola vaccine
U.S. News & World Report
The final phase in a randomized trial in Guinea shows promising initial results in testing a vaccine against Ebola, a virus that ravaged West Africa and left global officials scrambling to control its spread. "If proven effective, this is going to be a game-changer," Dr. Margaret Chan, director general of the World Health Organization, said in a call with reporters. "It will change the management of the current Ebola outbreak and future outbreaks."
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Big swings in blood pressure could spell trouble
HealthDay News via Doctors Lounge
Wide blood pressure fluctuations may signal an increased risk of heart disease and early death, researchers say. The large study of people taking blood pressure medication found that variations of more than 14 mm Hg in systolic blood pressure readings between doctor visits was linked to a 25 percent increased risk of heart failure. Systolic blood pressure is the top number in a blood pressure reading.
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How early-life stress could increase risk of anxiety and depression later in life
The Huffington Post
In a study on mice, which was published this week in the journal Nature Communications, researchers from McMaster University in Canada showed that early-life stress can lead to imbalances in the gut microbiome and contribute to the development of anxiety and depression. "Early life stress changes the composition and metabolic activity of bacteria in the gut," the study's lead author, Dr. Premysl Bercik, a professor of gastroenterology at the university's medical school, told The Huffington Post in an email. "We postulate that this change is due to altered gut function induced by stress."
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Nurse entrepreneurship explodes across the US (By Keith Carlson)
Could nap rooms help hospital shift workers? (By Joan Spitrey)
Nurses have a duty to draw the line on substandard care (Boston Globe)
A major loophole in the healthcare transparency law: Nurses don't need to report their dealings with drug companies (Pacific Standard)
Cutting physician and nurse pay would have limited effect on costs (Hospitals & Health Networks)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.

 



AzNA Today

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169   
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