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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit    November 10, 2014



 

Prevention is key: Workplace violence in the hospital
By Keith Carlson
With the recent news of several nurses in a Minnesota hospital being injured by a patient wielding a metal bar, the issue of healthcare workers facing violence in the workplace is again receiving media scrutiny. Those employed in emergency departments understand they are particularly subject to the emotional volatility of patients who may face long waits in particularly busy facilities. However, the recent events in Minnesota demonstrate that a normal medical-surgical unit is not immune from such violence.
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AzNA NEWS & EVENTS


Ebola Resources
We would like to share the most updated information on Ebola so that you can continue educating the public while taking the necessary precautions in your workplace. Please visit www.aznurse.org for daily updates.
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Join the AzNA Member Blog Discussion
Ebola Preparedness
If this is your first time signing in, your username is the same e-mail address that is registered with AzNA and ANA. There are instructions to re-set your password if needed.

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UPCOMING EVENTS
Mark your calendars for upcoming AzNA events.

Date Event Location
Jan. 16, 2015 Nurses Making Public Policy Purposeful Scottsdale Healthcare Shea
Feb. 11, 2015
Nurses Lobby Day Az State Capitol
March 4, 2015APRN Lobby Day Az State Capitol


PUBLIC POLICY


Sunrise hearings
Arizona’s sunrise review process provides a mechanism for both health professions and non-health professions to request regulation and, for health professions, expansion in scope of practice. Committees of reference will soon be hearing requests for changes in practice scopes with reports due before the first session of the 52nd legislature convenes on Jan. 12, 2015. The AzNA Public Policy team is following several possible sunrise applications including Physician Assistants, Surgical Assistants, Pharmacists and Naturopaths.
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EDUCATIONAL EVENTS & RESEARCH


American Red Cross, Trans-Siberian Orchestra offer blood donors tickets to upcoming concert
The American Red Cross and Trans-Siberian Orchestra (TSO) will offer blood donors the opportunity to enjoy the upcoming TSO concert for free on Nov. 30. The first 50 presenting blood donors on Nov. 14, 2014 at Rural Metro Fire Department from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. will receive a pair of tickets to the local TSO concert. Give the perfect gift with the Red Cross this holiday season and enjoy Trans-Siberian Orchestra. To schedule a donation appointment, simply download the blood donor app, visit www.redcrossblood.org or call 1-800-RED CROSS
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Undy Run Discount Registration Fees for AzNA Members
The Undy Run/Walk is a family-friendly event that was created by the Colon Cancer Alliance. It is unique because participants are encouraged to run in their boxers to bring attention to the area affected by colon cancer. AzNA Members can use the "AZNA" code for a $5 discount on registration fees.

Who: Colon Cancer Alliance
When: Nov. 16, 2014
Where: State Capitol District, 1600 W. Washington St, Downtown Phoenix
When: 7:30 a.m. the on-site registration and race packet pickup begin and at 9:00 a.m. the 5k begins

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IN THE NEWS



How technology can help contain an outbreak
By Jared Hill
Hollywood has trained most of us to envision what happens during an epidemic. We see the first case of a disease, which seems innocuous to the people in the film. Then it spreads with increasing velocity, until it almost outpaces or completely overwhelms the systems in place to prevent it. In real life, however, disease control experts have fended off quite a few potentially disastrous contagious diseases — often with cutting-edge technology at their disposal.
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Study: Newer pneumonia vaccine for kids beats older version
HealthDay News
A new pneumococcal vaccine is almost 30 percent more effective than its previous version in preventing hospitalizations of young children for pneumonia, a new study shows. The vaccine — called PCV13 — protects against 13 strains of pneumococcal bacteria, which is the leading cause of pneumonia in children younger than 5. Introduced in 2010, the new vaccine improved upon a seven-strain version that had been used since 2000. The introduction of that vaccine led to a more than 40 percent decline in childhood hospitalizations for pneumonia, according to background information in the study.
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Revolutionary new antibiotic alternative could save the world from superbug 'apocalypse'
Newsweek
Scientists have developed a new alternative to antibiotics that could revolutionise the way we treat superbugs and avoid a scenario where common medical procedures become life-threatening due to bacteria becoming immune to conventional drugs. Mark Offerhaus, the CEO of the Dutch Biotech company Micreos, which developed the drug, has said that the advance signals "a new era in the fight against antibiotic-resistant bacteria."
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Study points to overdiagnosis of thyroid cancer
The New York Times
The thyroid cancer rate in the United States has more than doubled since 1994. Cancer experts agree that the reason for the jump is not a real increase in the disease. Instead, it is down to screening, which is finding tiny and harmless tumors that are better left undisturbed, but that are being treated aggressively. In the United States and Europe, where there are no formal, widespread screening programs for thyroid cancer, scans for other conditions, like ultrasound exams of the carotid artery in the neck or CT scans of the chest, are finding tiny thyroid tumors. Although more and more small thyroid cancers are being found, however, the death rate has remained rock steady and low.
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Nurses need education on advance healthcare directives
Oncology Nurse Advisor
An educational program for nurses can help address knowledge gaps related to advance health care directives (AHCDs), according to new research. This will help to ensure that patients' wishes for care at the end of life are known and respected. Maureen Kroning, Ed.D., RN, of Nyack College in New York and Good Samaritan Hospital presented her hospital's experience with developing an inservice educational program to provide nurses with needed information on advance directives. In the Journal of Christian Nursing, she wrote, "It is vital to recognize and address problems associated with AHCD so nurses can provide competent and compassionate care."
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Report: Bed position matters for stroke patients, but clear guidelines aren't available
HealthDay News
Hospital bed positioning can be critical in the first 24 hours after a person suffers an ischemic stroke, according to a new report. Researchers summarized the latest research on ischemic stroke, the most common type of stroke, which occurs when a clot blocks blood flow to the brain. Sitting upright can harm ischemic stroke patients because it decreases blood flow to the brain when it needs more blood, the researchers explained. This would suggest that it's best to keep these patients lying as flat as possible, but strokes can also cause brain swelling that can damage the brain. Keeping patients sitting upright helps improve blood drainage and reduces swelling, the authors noted.
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Children's asthma found to improve after adenotonsillectomy
Medical News Today
Children with asthma can control their symptoms better after having surgery to remove their adenoids and tonsils, according to researchers from the University of Chicago. In the study, the authors compared the hospital admissions and prescriptions of children with asthma before and after having adenotonsillectomy surgery, in order to assess whether the control of their asthma improved following the operation.
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Longer hospital stay equals lower mortality, fewer readmissions
FieceHealthcare
One extra day in the hospital cuts costs and significantly reduces the chance of the need to readmit Medicare patients within 30 days, a new study from Columbia Business School found. That extra day slashed the risk of death for patients treated for pneumonia by 22 percent. Mortality for heart attack patients was cut by 7 percent, as were readmission rates, according to an announcement detailing the findings. Overall, the number of heart attack and pneumonia patient lives saved with one more day of hospitalization versus outpatient treatment increased five- to six-fold, the school said. The cost savings came into play when comparing the cost of the extra day of hospitalization with the cost of outpatient care required with an earlier discharge.
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No regrets: Texas nurse who got Ebola would treat again
USA Today
A Dallas nurse who contracted the deadly Ebola virus after treating the nation's only fatality said she has no regrets about treating Thomas Eric Duncan and would treat other Ebola patients. "Nursing is what I do. I could never see a patient that needs help and not do everything I can to help them," Amber Vinson told NBC's Today show.
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How advancements in ultrasound revolutionized healthcare
MedGadget
VideoBrief New advancements in technology, from CT and MRI scanners to balloon catheters and replacement heart valves, have repeatedly revolutionized clinical care. Usually this is due to brand new capabilities that were simply impossible before the new technology came on the scene. But in certain cases, existing technology that has been around for decades all of a sudden becomes smart and convenient enough to do amazing things that were previously not expected. Such is the case with ultrasound. Here's a talk from this year's TEDMED by Resa Lewiss, Director of Point-of-Care Ultrasound and Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine and Radiology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, talking about what this has meant for doctors and patients and for treatment of a variety of disease.
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Head injuries linked to more trouble for teens
CBS News
Teenagers who have experienced a traumatic brain injury are much more likely to engage in a wide range of risky behaviors, Canadian researchers report. Both boys and girls were more likely to smoke, use drugs, drink alcohol and get poor grades after they endured a blow to the head that knocked them out for longer than five minutes or landed them in the hospital for a day or more, the study found.
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Cancer prehabilitation: 1 step toward improved outcomes
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Oncology nurses are critical to the delivery of high-quality cancer care and, as such, they are frequently introduced to patients immediately following a diagnosis. Indeed, nurses often spend more time with survivors with newly diagnosed cancer than any other healthcare professional. This early access provides a perfect opportunity for them to not only provide education and moral support, but also administer assessments to determine how cancer prehabilitation could be used to improve patients' health outcomes.
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Home nurse visits decrease maternal and infant mortality
Contemporary Pediatrics
Disadvantaged mothers who receive regular home visits by nurses during pregnancy and through their child’s second birthday are less likely to die from all-cause mortality and their children are less likely to die from preventable causes than their counterparts who do not have such visits. These were the main findings of a 2-decade study in more than 1100 primarily African American women and their firstborn children who lived in highly disadvantaged urban neighborhoods.
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AzNA Today

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169   
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