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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit    November 24, 2014



 



Nurses in the news: As we speak up, the world is listening
By Keith Carlson
With nurses rated by more than 80 percent of the American public as the most honest and trustworthy professionals in the United States in every Gallup poll since 2005, we nurses are in a golden position to leverage our voices for the good of the profession and society at large. Recently, nurses have had the opportunity to emerge as unusually prominent voices in the media. This increased focus on the opinions of nurses is an important shift to which we should pay close attention.
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AzNA NEWS & EVENTS


Call for Volunteers for AzNA Biennial Convention Planning Committee
It is time to begin planning for AzNA's Biennial Convention to be held on Oct. 21-23, 2015. The time commitment is 4 to 6 months for 1 to 2 conference calls per month. Please send your name to info@aznurse.org if you are interested in participating.
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Ebola Resources
We would like to share the most updated information on Ebola so that you can continue educating the public while taking the necessary precautions in your workplace. Please visit www.aznurse.org for daily updates.
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Chapter 30 East Valley Quarterly Members Meeting
Thursday, Dec. 4, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Banner Desert Medical Center, Aspen A Classroom
1400 S. Dobson Rd, Mesa, AZ 85202
Presenter - TBD
Dinner Provided
Please RSVP to aznachapter30@gmail.com

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UPCOMING EVENTS
Mark your calendars for upcoming AzNA events.

Date Event Location
Jan. 16, 2015 Nurses Making Public Policy Purposeful Scottsdale Healthcare Shea
Jan. 16, 2015
Arizona Action Coalition Summit Scottsdale Healthcare Shea
Feb. 11, 2015
Nurses Lobby Day Az State Capitol
March 4, 2015APRN Lobby Day Az State Capitol


PUBLIC POLICY


AzNA's efforts for the APRN Consensus Model
Current efforts are focused on the APRN Consensus Model/APRN Compact Legislation where groups of representatives from each of the four APRN roles in Arizona are collectively working on drafts of Sunrise applications; the process for changing scope of practice in Arizona (2015) and future legislation to expand that scope (2016). This activity will greatly impact future health care delivery by allowing APRNs to practice to their full extent. We wish to recognize Dr. Denise Link (AzNA BOD, Governmental Affairs Officer) and Rory Hays (AzNA Lobbyist) for their commitment and dedication to this work.
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Health insurance marketplace open enrollment began Nov. 15
Go straight to the government website using the headline link. For more comprehensive information and links see the AzNA Medicaid Information page, here.
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Join nurses who make a difference at the legislature
The AzNA Public Policy committee is open to members who are interested in serving nurses by working very hard for a few weeks on a virtual committee. In exchange, you will get to review and assess new bills as they are proposed at the Arizona legislature and join in discussions about how AzNA should respond. This is a unique service/learning opportunity. Denise G. Link, Ph.D., NP, FAAN, FAANP chairs this committee. She invites interested persons to contact her at info@aznurse.org. Please indicate “Public Policy Committee” in the subject line.
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EDUCATIONAL EVENTS & RESEARCH


ASU College of Nursing & Health Innovation offering Interprofessional Fellowship in Innovative Health Leadership
ASU’s CONHI is once again offering the Interprofessional Fellowship in Innovative Health Leadership program. The second cohort starts in February. For more information visit ASU’s website or contact Melissa Wenzel.
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American Red Cross Blood Drive for the Holiday Season
The American Red Cross asks eligible donors to make an appointment to give blood to help ensure sufficient blood supplies are available for patients this holiday season.

Blood donations often decline during the holidays when donors get busy with travel and family gatherings, but the need for blood remains steady. Someone in the U.S. needs blood every two seconds.

Find the closest donation spot to you!

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IN THE NEWS


Improving communications: What can hospitals learn from hotels?
Archita Datta Majumdar
We live in an age where communication can make or break a deal. Doing it right has never been so important, yet there are more misunderstandings and misinterpretations all around. Ironic, isn't it? Since most have us become slaves to technology and instant communication, things actually can go wrong faster than ever before. There's a lesson to be learned here. And who better to learn from than the hospitality industry, which works on the basis of effective communication around the clock? At least that's what the healthcare industry is quickly figuring out.
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Low-income kids missing out on preventive care
The Clinical Advisor
Millions of low-income children are failing to get the free preventive exams and screenings guaranteed by Medicaid, and the Obama administration is not doing enough to fix the problem, according to a federal watchdog report. The report, released by the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Inspector General (OIG), says the administration has boosted rates of participation but needs to do more to ensure that children get the regular wellness exams, dental checkups, and vision and hearing tests.
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Patients embrace sharing medical notes with family, caregivers
FierceHealthIT
Patients increasingly are using technology to share their health information with family or friends, and access to information is causing them to pay better attention to their care, according to a recent study. Published this week in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, the research looked at patient use of OpenNotes, initially a one-year program that gave patients electronic access to medical notes written by their physicians. Of the roughly 4,500 study participants, more than 55 percent said they would like the option of giving family or friends access to the notes, and 21 percent said they shared the information with others during the study period.
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The role of simulation in the reduction of medical errors
By Joan Spitrey
If you have taken a CPR class in the last few decades, you are familiar with Resusci Anne, the manikin used for learning CPR. The first Anne was invented to provide life-like training in the 1960s, and her soft helpless face was to inspire the rescuer to want to help the "dead" person. Today, the use of simulation has evolved way beyond the initial revolutionary thoughts of the first creators of Anne. The use of simulations is now an integral part of most healthcare providers' curricula.
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Researchers: Alzheimer's cases expected to double by 2050
HealthDay News
The number of people with Alzheimer's disease in the United States will more than double by 2050 — a trend driven by the aging baby boomer population, a new study predicts. The cost of caring for these Alzheimer's patients will climb from $307 billion to $1.5 trillion a year by 2050, the researchers estimated. They believe that, 35 years from now, the average annual per-patient cost of the disease will be double that of the $71,000-a-year cost in 2010.
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Needles no more: Say hello to a tube of squeezable biologics
BioPharma-Reporter.com
Drug companies are looking for ways to put biologics in topical creams or "zap" them into skin using electricity as more large molecules come off patent. Until now, topical biologics have been unpopular among developers because of permeation problems. But advances in technology and a push to stay competitive as patents expire have led drugmakers to identify new delivery methods, according to contact research organizations Kemwell and Tergus Pharma.
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Recombinant enzyme helps in rare childhood illness
MedPage Today
The complications of a rare childhood liver disease can be relieved by delivering a recombinant version of a missing enzyme, a researcher said. Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency, or LALD, is an autosomal recessive disorder that leads to the accumulation of lipid particles in lysosomes, organelles within cells that break down biomolecules, according to Manisha Balwani, M.D., of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. In particular, she told a late-breaker session at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases annual meeting, the body is unable to break down the cholesterol esters and triglycerides that are mainly stored in the liver.
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Toward more accurate detection of fever in children
Advance for NPs & PAs
Fever is a common parental concern that results in numerous medical visits to both outpatient clinics and emergency departments. It has been widely documented that poor, urban communities have less access to medical care, less educational attainment and lower health literacy than their wealthier counterparts. Studies have demonstrated that although fever knowledge deficits and fears about its management and consequences, referred to as "fever phobia," are prevalent across all socioeconomic classes, caregivers' educational attainment is inversely related to increased utilization of the ED for fever.
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Researchers: 'Wireless' pacemaker working well so far
HealthDay News
For a handful of patients who've received the first wire-free pacemaker, the results are still good after 18 months, researchers reported. Unlike traditional pacemakers, the new device — marketed as Nanostim — is completely self-contained and requires no wires to connect it to the heart muscle. It's also implanted through a catheter, which bypasses the need for a chest incision. Nanostim and similar devices under development could "transform the field of cardiology in the next five to 10 years," said Ken Ellenbogen, M.D., an AHA spokesman and chairman of cardiology at the Medical College of Virginia, in Richmond.
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Nurse navigators enhance effectiveness of follow-up for colon cancer screening
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Group Health patients with a positive screening test for colon cancer tended to be more likely to get the recommended follow-up test, a diagnostic colonoscopy, if nurse navigators contacted them than if they got usual care. This is according to "Results of Nurse Navigator Follow-up After Positive Colorectal Cancer Screening Test: A Randomized Trial" in the November-December Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, led by Beverly B. Green, M.D., MPH, a Group Health physician and a Group Health Research Institute associate investigator.
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Deaths from heart disease down, up for blood pressure, irregular heartbeat
HealthDay News
Deaths from heart disease are dropping, but deaths related to high blood pressure and irregular heartbeats are on the rise, a new government study finds. From 2000 to 2010, the overall death rate from heart disease dropped almost 4 percent each year, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, researchers found. At the same time, death rates linked to high blood pressure-related heart disease increased 1.3 percent a year, according to the study. The researchers also found that deaths tied to irregular heartbeats rose 1 percent a year.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

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How technology can help contain an outbreak (By Jared Hill)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 



AzNA Today

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169   
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