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IBM's Watson wants to fix America's doctor shortage
The Verge
In 2011, IBM's Watson supercomputer got an unusually public proof-of-concept, competing on Jeopardy! and beating its human competitors hands-down. It was a powerful public win for IBM, and for artificial intelligence at large, but the computer at the center of all that publicity was still basically a prototype. If Watson can do this, IBM wanted to say, imagine what it can do in the real world.

Now, Watson is getting its chance. For the past year, the Watson team has been building up the supercomputer's medical skills, scanning through exam books to learn the basic principles of diagnosis and learning to parse the often-confusing mess of data in electronic health records.


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INDUSTRY NEWS


Antibiotic resistance nightmares are happening
Las Vegas Guardian Express
The National Resources Defense Council has started warning the general public about the nightmare of antibiotic resistance that happened during the Foster Farms chicken salmonella occurrence. Several strains of salmonella that were found in that outbreak have turned out to be antibiotic resistant. This is a crisis that is in the making.
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Changing healthcare dynamics and the surge of urgent care centers
By Archita Datta Majumdar
Affordable Care Act is poised to dramatically change the way we view and experience healthcare. The implementation of this law has paved the way for less costly outpatient care, which has in turn led to a boom in affordable urgent care centers and retail clinics across the country. There are now more than 8,000 urgent and immediate care centers all over the nation, a figure that is set to grow at 8-10 percent per year, according to the Urgent Care Association of America.
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Under the CyberKnife
Advanced Health Network
The CyberKnife Robotic Radiosurgery System is a noninvasive, painless treatment option that with pin-point accuracy and no incision delivers high doses of radiation to both cancerous and non-cancerous tumors throughout the body, including the brain, kidneys, lungs, prostate, spine, liver and pancreas.
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How Google Glass is now being used during surgery
Forbes
Philips Healthcare and Accenture are developing a new way to help surgeons deliver more efficient and effective patient care using Google Glass technology. Google Glass is wearable technology that looks like eyeglasses, but without the lenses. Instead, a small prism on the right side displays information via a Wi-Fi or Bluetooth connection to the MyGlass app on Android or iOS devices.
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Toxicology rounds: The brain death that wasn't
Emergency Medicine News
The headline on www.syracuse.com, the website for that city's daily newspaper, The Post Standard, immediately grabbed my attention: "St. Joe's 'dead' patient awoke as docs prepared to remove organs." The article offered some intriguing but sketchy details. The patient, a 41-year-old woman, was brought to a local hospital in 2009 following an overdose of Xanax, Benadryl, and a muscle relaxant. Several days after admission, she was declared brain dead and scheduled to have her organs removed for donation.
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Law a new weapon against breast cancer
The Times Leader
Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett signed into law a Senate bill, for which Rep. Karen Boback authored matching legislation in the House, that will help better safeguard women against breast cancer. Senate Bill 358 requires U.S. Food and Drug Administration facilities to notify women of their breast density, which can impact the effectiveness of traditional mammograms.
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