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Archive Volume 16, Issue 2 March/April 2015
Published by the Hemophilia Association of the Capital Area | HACAcares.org


Future treatment may be best for kids with hepatitis C
HPCLive

The best time to treat children infected with the hepatitis C virus may be off in the future when newer, better drugs with fewer side effects are expected to be approved for pediatric populations, according to the authors of a recent article in Clinical Liver Disease.
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HIV-infected patients prescribed ART display low post-operative mortality rates
Medical Daily

HIV infections pose many immediate risks to its sufferers, especially those undergoing even the most simple of surgeries. Recent research in the European Journal of Anesthesiology has found that patients with HIV have five times a greater risk of post-operative mortality within the 30-day period after surgery.
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Commemorating those impacted by tainted blood scandal
The Leader-Post

Seventeen years ago, an inquiry by Justice Horace Krever recommended compensation for the thousands of Canadians who had received blood tainted with HIV and hepatitis C more than a decade prior.
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Two interferon-free regimens show high HCV cure rates for people with HIV and HCV co-infection
NAM

A pair of two-drug, 12-week regimens containing neither interferon nor ribavirin — sofosbuvir plus either ledipasvir (the Harvoni coformulation) or daclatasvir — cured hepatitis C for more than 95 percent of people with HIV and hepatitis C co-infection, according to two presentations at the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Seattle. These findings confirm that people living with HIV who have hepatitis C can be treated the same as those with hepatitis C alone.
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Llamas hold the key to breakthrough in AIDS research
The Hindu Business Line

Thirty years after AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) was discovered, scientists continue to struggle with the disease caused by the HIV (human immunodeficiency virus), with current medical solutions only providing symptomatic relief. However, hope is around the corner. The gentle and endearing South American llamas may hold the clues to a vaccine against HIV, one of the deadliest killers today.
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Promising data bodes well for all-Achillion hep C treatment
Reuters

Achillion Pharmaceuticals Inc's experimental hepatitis C drug, when used with Gilead Sciences Inc's Sovaldi, eradicated signs of the virus in six weeks, the shortest duration and highest response achieved by any two-drug treatment.
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Organ transplants between HIV-positive patients show promise
The Verge

People with HIV are living longer than ever, thanks to antiviral drugs. While that's great news for those with the virus, it also means that they're starting to face the medical complications that crop up with old age — like organ failure. Researchers have been experimenting with transplants between HIV-positive donors and HIV-positive recipients, and a new study shows that these can be done with increasingly promising results.
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McHenry man cured of hepatitis through new drugs
Northwest Herald

Ray Roach reflects on the grim prognosis a doctor delivered to him during a hospital stay nearly four years ago and smiles. He smiles a lot these days, in fact. Twisting free of a noose will do that for a person.
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NIH-funded scientists create potential long-acting HIV therapeutic
NIH

Scientists have created a new molecule that shows promise for controlling HIV without daily antiretroviral drugs. The molecule foils a wider range of HIV strains in the laboratory than any known broadly neutralizing HIV antibody and is more powerful than some of the most potent of these antibodies. In addition, the molecule safely protected monkeys from infection with an HIV-like virus during a 40-week study period. Together, the data suggest that the molecule could, with further research, be used to subdue HIV in humans.
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Hemophilia cured in mice models using new genome editing method
HCPLive

Stanford researchers were able to cure hemophilia in mice models using a new genome editing method. Their findings were published in Nature. A safer genome editing method might cure hemophilia in mice, according to research published in the journal Nature.
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Deferring hepatitis C treatment can lead to liver cancer and death, despite cure
NAM

People with HIV and hepatitis C co-infection who delay hepatitis C treatment remain at risk for liver failure, hepatocellular carcinoma and liver-related death even after being cured – with outcomes worsening the longer it is put off — indicating that treatment should not be deferred until advanced disease, according to a presentation at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Seattle. Treating only after progression to cirrhosis increased the risk of liver-related death by more than five-fold and the duration of infectiousness by four-fold.
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Combo therapy for HCV, HIV co-infection: New data on sustained virologic response
Monthly Prescribing Reference

Bristol-Myers Squibb Company announced results from ALLY-2, a Phase 3 trial evaluating the use of daclatasvir and sofosbuvir for the treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis C virus co-infected with HIV.
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98 percent hep C cure rate for Harvoni in those coinfected with HIV
Hep Magazine

Twelve weeks of Gilead Sciences' Harvoni yielded a 98 percent hepatitis C virus cure rate among those with genotype 1 of the virus who are coinfected with HIV. Researchers in an open-label, Phase IIb pilot study gave 12 weeks of Harvoni to 50 treatment-naive, noncirrotic participants. They published their findings in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
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Doctor panel to weigh hepatitis C drugs' costs in guidelines
Bloomberg Business

An influential advisory panel of doctors and health experts will for the first time address the cost-effectiveness of pricey hepatitis C drugs in updated guidelines that may change prescribing and coverage for the medicines.
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