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Archive Volume 16, Issue 3 May/June 2015
Published by the Hemophilia Association of the Capital Area | HACAcares.org


Daclatasvir-sofosbuvir treatment highly effective in patients with HCV and HIV co-infection
News-Medical

Phase III results revealed today at The International Liver Congress™ 2015 show that once-daily treatment with daclatasvir plus sofosbuvir resulted in an overall 97 percent sustained virologic response at 12 weeks post-treatment in patients with hepatitis C virus and HIV co-infection, including cirrhotic patients.
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Hepatitis C linked to increased risk of liver cancer, other cancers
Medical News Today

Researchers have long known that patients with hepatitis C are at increased risk of liver cancer. But a new study recently presented at the European Association for the Study of the Liver's 50th International Liver Congress in Vienna, Austria, finds hepatitis C may also raise the risk of developing other cancers.
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New EASL guidelines prioritise interferon-free hepatitis C treatment
NAM Aidsmap

The European Association for the Study of the Liver released its latest hepatitis C treatment guidelines at the 50th International Liver Congress which took place last week in Vienna, Austria. The guidelines recommend a variety of interferon-free direct-acting antiviral regimens for people with hepatitis C virus genotypes 1-6.
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Research links HIV to age-accelerating cellular changes
Medical Xpress

People undergoing treatment for HIV-1 have an increased risk for earlier onset of age-related illnesses such as some cancers, renal and kidney disease, frailty, osteoporosis and neurocognitive disease. But is it because of the virus that causes AIDS or the treatment?
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HIV patients experience better kidney transplant outcomes than Hepatitis C patients
Medical Xpress

HIV (human immunodeficiency virus)-positive kidney transplant patients experienced superior outcomes when compared to kidney transplant patients with Hepatitis C and those infected with both HIV and Hepatitis C, according to a study led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and published online in Kidney International.
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Hemophilia in the managed care setting
AJMC

Hemophilia A and B are chronic inherited bleeding disorders that together rank as one of the most expensive chronic diseases in the United States. Factor replacement products, which are the mainstay of treatment, are among the most expensive therapies, with a total annual cost of more than $250,000 per adult patient in the United States. Indirect costs also contribute to the economic burden and include lost productivity, caregivers' unpaid costs, and hemophiliarelated disability.
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Researchers use new gene editing tool to cut HIV DNA
News-Medical

The virus that causes AIDS is an efficient and crafty retrovirus. Once HIV inserts its DNA into the genome of its host cells, it has a long incubation period, and can remain dormant and hidden for years. And while physicians can mix and match a cocktail from a host of antiretroviral drugs to keep the virus in check, the virus can reactivate if treatment is stopped.
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RNAi therapeutic targeting antithrombin for treatment of hemophilia and rare bleeding disorders
Medical Xpress

Alnylam Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced the publication in Nature Medicine of pre-clinical results with ALN-AT3, an investigational RNAi therapeutic targeting antithrombin for the treatment of hemophilia and rare bleeding disorders.
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Stop the bleeding: Can gene therapy finally cure hemophilia?
Xconomy

Ben Haugstad is 12 years old and loves Taekwondo. He's been doing it for six years, and soon he’ll be a black belt. He also has a severe form of hemophilia. His body doesn't produce the machinery needed to clot blood, and at any moment a bad tumble or a bruise could quickly turn into an emergency.
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Gene therapy shows promise for immune disorder
BioNews

Six boys with the inherited immune disorder Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome have been successfully treated with a gene-therapy technique that harnesses a 'tamed' HIV virus. The six-year trial was held at Great Ormond Street Hospital in London, and Necker Children's Hospital in France. In six out of seven boys, the therapy successfully reversed symptoms such as eczema, recurrent infections and bleeding. One French child with a severe form of the disease no longer needs a wheelchair.
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siRNA against antithrombin alleviates symptoms of hemophilia
2 Minute Medicine

Researchers developed a small interfering RNA molecule targeting antithrombin production, ALN-AT3, which reduced AT concentrations in mice and monkeys when administered subcutaneously. Several animal hemophilia models showed that prophylactic treatment with ALN-AT3 resulted in decreased bleeding time, increased clot sizes, and greater thrombin production as compared to controls.
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Could an allergy drug treat hepatitis C?
TIME

An over-the-counter drug commonly used to treat allergies may one day also contribute to the treatment of hepatitis C, according to new research in mice published in the journal Science Translational Medicine.
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