Patients get extreme to obtain hepatitis drug that's 1 percent the cost outside US
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Archive Volume 16, Issue 4 July/August 2015
Published by the Hemophilia Association of the Capital Area | HACAcares.org


Patients get extreme to obtain hepatitis drug that's 1 percent the cost outside US
Bloomberg

This is how far one Express Scripts Holding Co. executive was willing to go to secure inexpensive versions of Sovaldi, unavailable to U.S. consumers under federal drug import and patent laws. His plan: Dock a cruise ship flying an Indian flag off the coast of Miami. Stock the ship with versions of Sovaldi sold in India for $83,000 less than the U.S. retail price for 12 weeks of treatment. Ferry U.S. patients to the boat and send them home with the potentially life-saving medicines at a huge discount.
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New treatment approach to limit damage after joint bleed
MedicalXpress

The results of a study presented at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress (EULAR 2015) identified that the cytokine (cell signaling protein) Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is a crucial factor in the development of blood-induced cartilage damage. This finding opens up the possibility that a treatment targeting IL-1β could provide a new way to protect cartilage after a joint bleed, which in turn should significantly reduce subsequent disability.
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Scripps team lays 'spectacular' foundations for HIV vaccine
Medical News Today

"A leap forward" has been made to develop a vaccine against HIV, claim the authors of two new studies that are published concurrently in the journals Cell and Science. The aim of the research is to design a vaccine that elicits an immune response against HIV, producing antibodies that bind to the virus and prevent infection.
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Research finding could explain why HIV envelope protein has a long tail
Emory University

Virologists at Emory University School of Medicine, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta have uncovered a critical detail explaining how HIV assembles its infectious yet stealthy clothing. For HIV to spread from cell to cell, the viral envelope protein needs to become incorporated into viral particles as they emerge from an infected cell. Researchers led by Paul Spearman, M.D., have found that a small section of the envelope protein, located on its "tail," is necessary for the protein to be sorted into viral particles.
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FDA addresses concerns on approval of drugs to treat chronic hepatitis C
Infection Control Today

"FDA's approach to evaluation of recent hepatitis C drugs underscores the Agency's flexibility in considering innovative or alternative trial designs for drugs that have demonstrated highly promising outcomes in early phase development," says Dr. Poonam Mishra, deputy director for Safety, Division of Antiviral Products/Office of Antimicrobial Products in the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research and lead author of the Hepatology paper. "Expedited approaches can be used without compromising efficacy standards for drugs that demonstrate breakthrough therapy potential."
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Researchers exploit HIV's "sweet tooth" to weaken virus
Vaccine News Daily

Researchers recently discovered that HIV has a "sweet tooth" for sugar and nutrients from activated immune cells, which may prove to be the cell's weak spot where scientists can administer treatments for patients.
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Computer-designed antibodies to help fight HIV
Red Orbit

Thus far, nature has not developed a way for humans to battle the human immunodeficiency virus, so researchers at Vanderbilt University have decided to "cheat" nature and use a sophisticated computer program called Rosetta in order to design new weapons in the battle against AIDS.
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