Interaction Weekly
Apr. 2, 2014

Study: Children's books that feature animals with human traits create confusion in young minds about nature, biology
National Post
Winnie the Pooh, Charlotte's Web, Babar, Peter Rabbit, Bugs Bunny, Mickey Mouse – they're all staples in children's literature and pop culture. And all these stories feature animals with human characteristics; they talk, wear clothes, and have other human tendencies. But a new study by University of Toronto researchers has found that kids' books that feature animals with human characteristics not only inhibit factual learning, they may also hinder children's thinking and reasoning about real-life animals.More

Ottawa day cares in a state of flux
CBC News
Many local day cares say they're tightening their belts or changing the age groups they cater to after losing older children to the school system. Ontario is nearing the end of the roll-out of full-day kindergarten, which will be complete by September 2014. Along with sending four- and five-year-old children to school all day, schools are providing care before and after class. Child care operators say this implementation has been one of the biggest changes to hit the sector in decades.More

Full-day kindergarten children score highest in vocabulary, self-regulation
Global News
Children in full-day kindergarten (FDK) do experience some benefit from the Ontario program, according to a recent study by the University of Toronto, but only in some areas. The study "Key findings from Year 3 of Full-Day Early Learning Kindergarten in Peel" found that Children who were enrolled in FDK programs were ahead of half-day kindergartners through the first and second grades in areas like vocabulary and self-regulation.More

How young is too young to travel?
CNN
The child was screaming and out of control as he and his mother boarded the aircraft. That much psychologist and parenting expert Kevin Leman remembers well. It could have been another tantrum-filled flight from hell. But Leman says a quick-thinking flight attendant could see what was about to unfold. She got the captain's attention and he ordered the family off the aircraft before they could get to their seats. More

How to raise happy kids: 10 steps backed by science
TIME
When you ask parents what they want for their kids, what's usually the most common reply? They want their children to be happy. Now there's tons of info on raising smart kids and successful kids, but how do you raise happy kids? Sometimes it's hard to balance what's best for children with what makes them happy — but the two don't have to be mutually exclusive. More

How young is too young to travel?
CNN
The child was screaming and out of control as he and his mother boarded the aircraft. That much psychologist and parenting expert Kevin Leman remembers well. It could have been another tantrum-filled flight from hell. But Leman says a quick-thinking flight attendant could see what was about to unfold. She got the captain's attention and he ordered the family off the aircraft before they could get to their seats. More

Experts: Day care is for learning, not babysitting
Milford Daily News
When choosing a day care centre for her son two years ago, Britney Frerotte looked for a place that emphasized child learning through various activities. Now nearly four, her son Henry goes five days a week to Easton Learning Adventures, where Frerotte said he takes part in daily art projects, sings during story time and has some unstructured play time. More

Day care delay worries students
The StarPhoenix
When Paulette D'eon found out she was pregnant, she immediately knew child care would be an issue. The University of Saskatchewan urban planning student put her name on the wait list for the University of Saskatchewan Students' Union (USS U) daycare centre on campus right away, months before her daughter Stella was even born.More

Study: Ontario teachers turn to free online resources amid budget cutbacks
Toronto Star
Ontario teachers are turning to free online resources in droves — more than textbooks and e-textbooks — marking a "significant change" in learning, says a new report that raises questions about how to ensure the quality of web materials used in the province's classrooms. The survey of 1,349 Ontario schools by People for Education found when elementary teachers need new materials, 36 per cent of school report they turn to the web for freebies, 31 per cent say print textbooks and 19 per cent online resources produced by publishers, for which there would be a cost.More

Regina's standardized test plans on back burner
The StarPhoenix
Education Minister Don Morgan says the provincial government's plans for standardized testing are still on hold - and money allocated in the budget for related software was largely held over and might not be spent. Morgan gave reporters in Regina an update on standardized testing after the Opposition raised concerns in question period on Tuesday. Budget documents identify $7.1 million "for student achievement software and for 500 new childcare spaces."More

Owen Sound Salvation Army day care closes
Owen Sound Sun Times
The Salvation Army day care in Owen Sound is to close its doors for good today, following years of declining enrolment. Major David Kennedy of the local organization said only six children have been attending the day care during the day in recent few weeks. Full-time day enrolment was at 35 kids when the Salvation Army announced its closure plan in early January.More

MLA David Swann: Make child care more affordable
CBC News
The provincial government needs to do more to create affordable child care options for Alberta families, says opposition MLA Dr. David Swann. The Calgary Liberal hosted a town hall meeting at the Hillhurst-Sunnyside community hall to discuss the issue. "We are spending the least of any province on early education in Canada," he said.More