Interaction Weekly
Apr. 30, 2014

Ontario Liberals boost child care workers' wages
Toronto Sun
The Ontario Liberals' rollout of pre-budget goodies continued with an additional $269 million to boost the wages of licensed child-care workers over three years. "This will not cost parents anything, it will not cost municipalities anything, and it will not cost the licensed child care operators," Education Minister Liz Sandals said.More

Craig Kielburger: How to Mentor Kids Who Care and Contribute

Based on the national bestseller The World Needs Your Kid: Raising Children Who Care and Contribute, this address delves into everything you need to know about mentoring kids, lending a hand and changing the world. Craig is the Co-Founder of Free The Children and the Co-Founder of Me to We. Craig Kielburger is a social entrepreneur, New York Times best-selling author, and syndicated columnist.More

Wisdom begins with Wonder!

Welcome to MCCA's 37th annual early childhood education conference, 'Wisdom Begins With Wonder". Once again a group of 12 dedicated volunteers, led by Karen Houdayer, MCCA's Professional Development Manger, have put together a selection of professional learning opportunities designed to spark your imagination, share a bit of knowledge and open your mind to wonder.More

Report: Special needs kids often told to stay home from school
Toronto Star
Half of elementary principals have told students with special needs to stay home from school for all or some of the day, in part because there's not enough help for them, a province-wide survey has found. "We were really surprised by the finding, said Annie Kidder, executive director of People for Education, which surveyed 1,349 Ontario schools and for the first time asked about forcing children to stay home after hearing numerous complaints from parents."More

Ontario increases child benefit in July
YorkRegion.com
Beginning in July, eligible York Region families will receive another increase of up to $100 annually, while many households will qualify for the Ontario Child Benefit for the first time, Children and Youth Services Minister Teresa Piruzza announced. With this increase, the benefit will top up to $1,310 annually and is part of Ontario's attempt to tie benefits to inflation, she said. More

Investing now in child care sure to pay off
London Free Press
The Free Press gave us a good introduction to the issues raised by the Ontario full-day kindergarten program in the article Kinder-surprises. Basis for this program is Charles Pascal's 2009 report With Our Best Future in Mind: Implementing Early Learning in Ontario. At that point Ontario had the best standards for child care in North America. The child care system in Ontario began when concerned early childhood educators established child care centres. These pioneers established high-quality care that the provincial government recognized and maintained with licensing.More

Movie theatre for autistic children a hit in Calgary
CBC News
A monthly movie event in Calgary has proven popular for families with autistic children. At Canyon Meadows Cinema, the lights are turned up, the sound is turned down and audience members are allowed to roam freely and make noise. For many, those changes make a big difference. More

Universal child care is an economic issue
Orleans News
When I first became a mother, I wasn't sure universally-subsidized child care was the best thing for families or for tax payers. At the time, I felt I was young enough to take a break from my career, and I valued the care that only I could provide to my children. I didn't want a surrogate. I wanted to be supermom, in the sense that I would be the one to manage the nurture, feeding and education of my young babes. Three children in and almost a decade later, I've changed my mind. Completely. More

Experts still divided over benefits of full-day kindergarten
St. Catharines Standard
When Ontario gambled on full-day kindergarten in 2010, critics called it costly babysitting the deficit-plagued province couldn't afford. Advocates — and many parents, freed of day care costs — cheered. With the final phase of FDK's $1.5 billion, five-year roll-out to 265,000 kids coming this fall, the province now has four years under its belt to judge whether early all-day schooling is making a difference. The evidence isn't clear-cut. More

Kids and the internet — a parent's primer on how to make surfing safe
McGill Reporter
Let's face it: most kids outpace their parents' technical skills online midway through primary school. But while tweens and teens may know way more than their parents when it comes to navigating Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Tumblr and or Ask.FM, they don't always show the experience, maturity and judgment to manage these powerful tools in responsible ways.More

Universal child care is an economic issue
Orleans News
When I first became a mother, I wasn't sure universally-subsidized child care was the best thing for families or for tax payers. At the time, I felt I was young enough to take a break from my career, and I valued the care that only I could provide to my children. I didn't want a surrogate. I wanted to be supermom, in the sense that I would be the one to manage the nurture, feeding and education of my young babes. Three children in and almost a decade later, I've changed my mind. Completely. More

Healthy appetite for healthier day care kids
Ottawa Sun
Call it a grassroots approach to cultivating healthy eating habits in children. Ottawa Public Health is looking to expand their reach into city day care centres to promote healthy eating choices among children, following last year's wildly successful pilot program. Now, OPH is looking to implement the guidelines in 350 local child care centres, and judging by the early returns, there is a healthy appetite for healthy appetites.More

Saskatchewan seeks input on child welfare legislation review
Global News
The province is making changes to child welfare legislation and is asking people for their opinion when it comes to protecting Saskatchewan's most vulnerable citizens. In 2010, a child welfare review panel put forward recommendations for the province to deal differently with children in care. The Saskatchewan ministry of social services reacted by reviewing two pieces of legislation that have a direct impact on day-to-day operations – The Child and Family Services Act and The Adoption Act, 1998.More

Council skirts support for $10-a-day child care
Salmon Arm Observer
Affordable day care yes, $10 a day, no. City council will be writing to the B.C. Ministry of Education advocating for affordable child care and early childhood education funding. This followed a request from the city's social issues committee, asking that council endorse a $10 a day child care plan, as presented to council in March by Early Childhood Educators of BC executive director Emily Mlieczko. More