Interaction Weekly
Jul. 23, 2014

Proposed Ontario child care law might save 2 Toronto day cares
Metro
New provincial child care legislation, reintroduced by the Kathleen Wynne government, may give Toronto new powers to stop commercial child care centres from gobbling up non-profit day cares when their leases expire, say city staff. If approved, the legislation may offer some protection to two non-profit day cares that are poised to lose their leases to a for-profit child care chain willing to pay more rent, said Elaine Baxter-Trahair, Toronto's general manager of children's services.More

Economy soared when women went to work, but what if more stay home?
The Vancouver Sun
Arguments for affordable child care usually focus on the help it provides for families, the leg up young children receive from structured interactions with other kids and trained caregivers, and/or the economic contribution of a vibrant child care industry. Maybe it's time now to pay more attention to a fourth issue: the much larger economic impact when more parents, mostly women, find it manageable and affordable to hold a job outside the home. More

Parents, businesses push for $10-a-day child care in B.C.
The Vancouver Sun
It is easy to see why parents such as Anna Geeroms, who pays $2,500 a month for a nanny three days a week, are enthusiastic supporters of a subsidized child care plan, but support is also coming from B.C.'s business community. The Surrey Board of Trade laid out the business case for $10-a-day child care in B.C. in a 2012 position paper, noting that parents with young children make up a significant share of the city’s workforce.More

London's first forest nursery school lets kids learn in the woods
Guelph Mercury
In the heart of north London lies the ancient Queens Wood, a green forest hidden away in a metropolis of more than 8 million residents. The sounds of the city seem to fade away as a group of children plays in a mud kitchen, pretending to prepare food and saw woodMore

Cost of care for children under 5 exceeds university tuition for some Vancouver families
The Vancouver Sun
Day care prices in Metro Vancouver have risen so high that the cost of four years of early-childhood care can exceed that of a four-year university degree. A typical family in Vancouver with a child in full-time care from the end of parental leave to the beginning of kindergarten can expect to pay somewhere in the neighbourhood of $50,000 for child care. By contrast, a four-year undergraduate arts degree at the University of B.C. costs about $31,000, including tuition, student fees and books.More

Province tightening day care controls
Cramahe Now
The Ontario government continues its support for families and children by re-introducing the Child Care Modernization Act, 2014. The legislation, if passed, would strengthen oversight of the province's unlicensed child care sector, while increasing access to licensed child care options for families. In addition, it would allow the province to immediately shut down a child care provider when a child's safety is at risk. More

Proposed Ontario child care law might save two Toronto day cares
Metro
New provincial child care legislation, reintroduced by the Kathleen Wynne government, may give Toronto new powers to stop commercial child care centres from gobbling up non-profit day cares when their leases expire, say city staff. If approved, the legislation may offer some protection to two non-profit day cares that are poised to lose their leases to a for-profit child care chain willing to pay more rent, said Elaine Baxter-Trahair, Toronto's general manager of children's services.More

High-quality day care closing as free lease ends
Toronto Star
More than 40 Toronto families are scrambling to find daycare after a long-standing non-profit centre in the city’s financial district is being forced to close. The 72-space Scotia Plaza Child Care Centre on King St. W. has been operated by George Brown College since 1989. Under an agreement between the city and the building’s developer, the bank tower was allowed extra density in exchange for free child care space for 25 years.More

2 kids, 2 salaries — and an extremely compact inner-city loft
The Globe and Mail
Kirk Jong and his wife, Elaine, are both engineers in their early 40s, making healthy salaries. They have two children – Kali, 9, and Kyle, almost 5. They sound like your average Canadian family, the kind typically found living in a big suburban house with a yard, a dog and a small, private transit system running everyone to jobs, schools, sports and the mall.More

22 kid-friendly restaurants in Toronto you'll want to eat in
The Huffington Post
When you had kids everyone said the same thing to you — say goodbye to nice restaurants and hello to place that only serve grilled cheese. (And also, "you'll never sleep again," but that's a theme for a different story.) But here's the wonderful thing about a city like Toronto: Plenty of people have kids, and plenty of people still want to go out for dinner with them. The city's restaurants have found a way to make that work in a non-chain restaurant fashion, and it's actually kind of awesome.More

Canada haven for U.S. babies
The Regina Leader-Post
At a time when international adoption is on the wane in many countries, it is becoming a surprising - and controversial - growth industry in Florida, where some birth mothers are seemingly looking to Canada as a kind of promised land. Growing numbers of Florida mothers wishing to place their African-American or mixed race children up for adoption are choosing Canada. Many have told adoption officials in Florida they want Canadian families to raise their infants so their children can escape the kind of racism they live with.More

High-quality day care closing as free lease ends
Toronto Star
More than 40 Toronto families are scrambling to find day care after a long-standing non-profit centre in the city's financial district is being forced to close. The 72-space Scotia Plaza Child Care Centre on King St. W. has been operated by George Brown College since 1989. Under an agreement between the city and the building's developer, the bank tower was allowed extra density in exchange for free child care space for 25 years.More

What is the right age to leave kids home alone?
CBC News
It's summertime and kids are out of school. Some parents have to face the decision of whether or not to leave their kids at home alone — from a short to a long period of time. Recently, a woman in the U.S. was arrested for allegedly leaving her nine-year old at a park while she went to work. More