Interaction Weekly
Nov. 6, 2013

National Child Day / la Journée nationale de l'enfant

Mark November 20 – National Child Day – on your calendar: http://www.cccf-fcsge.ca/archives/mark-november-20-national-child-day-on-your-calendar/

Notez le 20 novembre, la Journée nationale de l'enfant, sur votre calendrier: http://www.cccf-fcsge.ca/fr/archives/notez-le-20-novembre-la-journee-nationale-de-lenfant-sur-votre-calendrier/ More

Enhancing your day care program to meet the needs of a variety of ages
Etobicoke Guardian
You've taken the plunge and opened your own day care! Advertised, placed relevant information on your Facebook and LinkedIn profiles and spread the word. The good news is: you are enrolling children and are close to hitting capacity! The stressful part? Managing a program that offers a wide variety of activities and fun for the children who vary in ages.More

Multigenerational family living can offer added comforts at home
The Waterloo Region Record
With a baby on the way, Will Stroet and his wife, Kim The, realized their two-bedroom condo — which doubled as a work space — simply wasn't going be sufficient. Fortunately, the couple received an offer that was too good pass up: an invitation from Stroet's parents, Bill and Marion, to move in. More

Full-day kindergarten is failing our children
Maclean's
When German educator Friedrich Fröebel opened the world’s first kindergartens in the mid-1800s, he frequently found himself at odds with suspicious government officials. Prussia, for example, banned his schools in 1851, characterizing them as hotbeds of socialist subversion and radicalism. How things have changed. Today, most governments want more kindergarten, not less. Even the traditional half-day programs aren't enough. Five-year-olds in British Columbia, Quebec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island all attend full-day kindergarten. Ontario is currently in the fourth year of a five-year rollout for full-day junior and senior kindergarten, meaning kids as young as three attend school all day, five days a week.More

Toronto's 'Let's Talk Child Care' campaign starts
Toronto Star
Toronto is seeking parent input on child care challenges to help guide future city spending. "The city's economic future relies on a workforce that is ready and able to contribute," said Councillor Janet Davis. "And child care is a fundamental prerequisite. It is also key to healthy child development." At a time when more than three-quarters of mothers are working, there are licensed child care spaces for just 21 per cent of Toronto children under age 10, she noted.More

Pediatricians: Ban Internet in kids' bedrooms, limit social media use
CTV News
Doctors 2 parents: Limit kids' tweeting, texting & keep smartphones, laptops out of bedrooms. #goodluckwiththat. The recommendations are bound to prompt eye-rolling and LOLs from many teens but an influential pediatricians group says parents need to know that unrestricted media use can have serious consequences. More

Enhancing your day care program to meet the needs of a variety of ages
Etobicoke Guardian
You've taken the plunge and opened your own day care! Advertised, placed relevant information on your Facebook and LinkedIn profiles and spread the word. The good news is: you are enrolling children and are close to hitting capacity! The stressful part? Managing a program that offers a wide variety of activities and fun for the children who vary in ages. More

How to ensure child care investments pay off
The Globe and Mail
There is little doubt that quality child care is expensive and difficult for Canadian families to find. But in itself, high cost is not justification for public-sector involvement in day care — lots of things are expensive. To make the case for large-scale public investment, we need to evaluate whether public interventions make sense and are successful. We're fortunate to have a solid example: 16 years of experience with Quebec's public $7-a-day child care program.More

Sign of the times: Daycare learns deaf toddler's language
The Starphoenix
Cassidy Moulson knows more sign language than anyone else in class — even her teachers. And the not-quite-three-year-old isn't afraid to show it. "Even when she first started with us and we were first learning some signs, she would randomly go around the room (pointing) at things, making me see if I knew it," recalls Lindsey Lawton, director of the Boys and Girls Club early learning centre at John Lake School.More

Private child care provider set to take over at Peel day care facility
Mississauga News
Peel Region has wrapped up negotiations with a private daycare provider to take over management of Lancaster child care centre in Malton starting in January. The deal is the first of many currently in the works as the municipality moves to get out of direct delivery of day care. Children's services director Sonia Pace confirmed the deal during Peel's child care task force meeting. In addition to PLASP Child Care Services, Peel is currently negotiating with Family Day and YMCA to assume control of municipal day care facilities by next fall. More

Ontario Teachers acquires U.K.'s largest child care provider
The Globe and Mail
The Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan had added a British firm to its stable of investments. The plan has acquired Busy Bees Nursery Group (Busy Bees), the largest child care provider in the United Kingdom. The terms of the transaction were not disclosed and Busy Bees' management maintains a significant minority stake in the company.More

Potential dangers of unlicensed day cares
CMAJ
The death of two-year-old Eva Ravikovich brought national attention to the hazards and inconsistent oversight of unlicensed day cares in Canada. "Unfortunately, it took a death to bring it to public consciousness," says Andrea Calver, coordinator of the Ontario Coalition for Better Child Care. Eva died in an unlicensed home daycare in Vaughan, ON. Though the exact cause of death is still unknown, authorities found expired and rotting food in the allegedly overcrowded day care, including several items that contained listeria.More