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Squamish eyes day care incentives
Squamish Chief
Municipal officials are looking into ways to cut red tape for new day cares – businesses that are sorely needed in a community in which 340 babies were born last year, says councillor Susan Chapelle. There are 624 day care spaces in Squamish, Chapelle told District of Squamish officials at a council meeting. Of those, 24 are registered as license-not-required, meaning a care provider is watching her or his own children plus up to two more children or a sibling group.
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Snapping kid pics is the new faux pas
The Globe and Mail
On a recent tour of my local day care centre, a smiling, pig-tailed child care worker showed a group of parents around the sand pit, the water-play station, the arts-and-crafts centre and the organic vegetable plot. Moving on to the nursery school's health and safety measures, she mentioned the fire exits and the staff's first-aid training, and then added: "And of course, we also have a 'no photo' policy."
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3 great toys that can help your kids grow up to be coders
Yahoo
You may look back fondly on the toys you grew up with, but most of the time their educational value was pretty nonexistent. Times have changed. You may have played Go Fish, but your kids can play card games that teach programming fundamentals. Instead of building Erector Sets, they can create autonomous robots and learn how to debug BASIC commands while customizing their connected toys.
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Infant care spaces are disappearing across Muskoka
Bracebridge Examiner
It was expected and now it's here. Daycares are changing how they operate and who they serve now that full-day kindergarten has taken their most profitable clientele, those aged 3.8 years and older. The last round of schools to implement full-day kindergarten will open their new classrooms this fall, landing the final blow to some day cares.

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Squamish eyes day care incentives
Squamish Chief
Municipal officials are looking into ways to cut red tape for new day cares – businesses that are sorely needed in a community in which 340 babies were born last year, says councillor Susan Chapelle. There are 624 day care spaces in Squamish, Chapelle told District of Squamish officials at a council meeting. Of those, 24 are registered as license-not-required, meaning a care provider is watching her or his own children plus up to two more children or a sibling group.

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Global parenting habits that haven't caught on in the U.S.
NPR
If there's one thing have in common with those, it's that they both show us just how varied parenting styles can be. Argentine parents let their kids stay up until all hours; Japanese parents let 7-year-olds ride the subway by themselves; and Danish parents leave their kids sleeping in a stroller on the curb while they go inside to shop or eat.

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How to get your kids back into their school-year sleeping routine
Toronto Star
It looks and feels like summer—which is not surprising. After all, we're in August. Even so, summer is about to come to a screeching halt for many children. In fact, some kids are beginning to head back to school this week, with more following in the next week or two. That means no more sleeping until 9 a.m. or 10 a.m. (or noon for teenagers).
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Stop parading your kids around online
Canada.com
It used to be that we'd watch news clips of child beauty pageants with horror. Now, we're seeing parents modelling their kids on Instagram and sharing every last moment of their children's lives on Facebook. It's increasingly commonplace. It's also vain and unbecoming. And the more some parents feel the urge to pose their kids for the cameras and create daily dramas for global consumption, the more the rest of us need to tell them to dial it down. Now, to be clear, I'm not talking about all of those moms and dads who occasionally post photos of their kids on Facebook.
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Windsor Community Centre day care needs your help after devastating fire
Winnipeg Sun
Neighbourhood support is helping those affected by a fire at Windsor Community Centre focus on a brighter future, but it's expected to be at least six months before the heavily used building is back up and running. Among the more grim realities is the centre and its two outdoor rinks likely won't be hosting any hockey teams this upcoming season.
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Dream inspired author's first book in series
Alberni Valley Times
Port Alberni has many success stories coming out of our small town and Kim Cormack is the latest. With almost 20 years experience in the child care industry, the single mother of two considers her own children her greatest accomplishment. When she started putting pen to paper, however, her visions of becoming a published author went from a goal to reality and her future with a new publishing company is growing.
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Study: Eating chicken wings makes kids more aggressive
Toronto Sun
A new study has suggested that children are likely to be more aggressive if they eat chicken off the bone, as opposed to pre-cut chicken. The scientific study was carried out by diet experts on on 12 children, aged six to ten, in order to see how food impacts on behaviour, if it does at all.
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What kids' drawings say about their future thinking skills
NPR
At age 4, many young children are just beginning to explore their artistic style. The kid I used to babysit in high school preferred self-portraits, undoubtedly inspired by the later works of Joan Miro. My cousin, a prolific young artist, worked almost exclusively on still lifes of 18-wheelers. These early works may be good for more than decorating your refrigerator and cubicle, researchers say.
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Frank Humada, Director of Publishing, 289.695.5422
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