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How to ensure child care investments pay off
The Globe and Mail
There is little doubt that quality child care is expensive and difficult for Canadian families to find. But in itself, high cost is not justification for public-sector involvement in day care — lots of things are expensive. To make the case for large-scale public investment, we need to evaluate whether public interventions make sense and are successful. We're fortunate to have a solid example: 16 years of experience with Quebec's public $7-a-day child care program.
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Regina faces growing demand for accessible child care
Global News
"When I was in high school, I never saw myself with a child. I was one of those girls that never wanted children. I didn't like children," said 19-year-old Shayna Guy. A lot has changed for Guy since then. Having a baby wasn't exactly in her plans. Her friend Taylor Ketsak is also 19, and has two children. "I had Jayce just before my eighteenth birthday, and I wasn't planning on getting pregnant again, but it happens." said Ketsak.
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Pediatricians: Ban Internet in kids' bedrooms, limit social media use
CTV News
Doctors 2 parents: Limit kids' tweeting, texting & keep smartphones, laptops out of bedrooms. #goodluckwiththat. The recommendations are bound to prompt eye-rolling and LOLs from many teens but an influential pediatricians group says parents need to know that unrestricted media use can have serious consequences.
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What PEI and Quebec can teach the rest of Canada about improving child care
The Globe and Mail
For a top-notch child care system close to home, Canadians should look to the country's smallest province. Over the past two years, Prince Edward Island has launched what many experts consider the most comprehensive child care strategy since Quebec brought in its renowned low-fee program in 1997.
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The case for publicly funded child care in Canada
The Globe and Mail
In last week's 7,100-word Throne Speech, child care got 64 of them. But as any working parent searching for child care in this country already knows all too well, not even the most well-connected "expert" can find it for anywhere close to $100 a month.

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Regina faces growing demand for accessible child care
Global News
"When I was in high school, I never saw myself with a child. I was one of those girls that never wanted children. I didn't like children," said 19-year-old Shayna Guy. A lot has changed for Guy since then. Having a baby wasn't exactly in her plans. Her friend Taylor Ketsak is also 19, and has two children.

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Vote: Should Canada have a universal day care system?
The Globe and Mail
Canada is without a national day care program and critics say there should be one. Based on your experience, are you happy with the availability and cost of day care in Canada.

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6 ways parents can give kids a healthy 'media diet'
CBC News
Concerns about children's use of media are increasingly urgent in the digital age, say U.S. pediatricians who now recommend that parents establish a media consumption. The American Academy of Pediatrics released its revised policy statement on children, adolescents and the media at a conference in Orlando.
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Mastering the task of assigning chores to kids
The Chronicle Herald
We have a recurring game in our house called Whose Turn is it to Unload the Dishwasher? Some days, this game is brief and simple. Other days, it involves several rounds of "I did it yesterday!" or "Do I have to?" Such is the challenge of getting children to do chores.
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Summerside YMCA closing its child care programs
Journal Pioneer
Child care programs are being cut at the YMCA of Prince Edward Island. In a statement, the board of directors of the YMCA said it's shutting down the programs at the Summerside centre effective Dec. 20, because of declining numbers and increasing costs. The Summerside YMCA offered programs for infant care, a toddler care program, pre-school programs, pre-school and after school supervision for students and summer camps for regular students and special needs children.
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    Video: Lessons the rest of Canada should learn from PEI's day care overhaul (The Globe and Mail)
We want children, but can't afford day care (The Globe and Mail)

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String of unregulated home day cares dominate Toronto street
Toronto Star
Shortly after dawn, a leafy residential street near the Woodbine subway station springs to life. Family sedans and SUVs pull up on both sides of the street, throwing on four-way blinkers. Dads cross the road holding hands with toddlers, while mothers pass babies into the arms of smiling women on front porches. Within three hours, a total of 22 kids are dropped off along a strip of six houses on the north side of the street.
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Day care plan should be a priority for Christy Clark
Vancouver Courier
Thirty years ago this month Pauline Marois became the first cabinet minister in Canadian history to give birth while in office. It would be almost 15 years later, in the fall of 1997, that the Parti Québécois minister would usher in a package of child-friendly programs including what would be revolutionary in Canada — a $7-a-day childcare program. Pauline Marois is now the first female premier elected in Quebec.
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Opinion: Families have few options on child care
Toronto Star
Don Mustill's letter regarding my Universal Child Care Benefit analysis asks, "What makes more sense" — public dollars to the provinces or directly to parents? If he had read my report (easily available online) he might have learned that, as the claim is that the child care benefit increases "choice in child care," transferring the funds to the provinces does make more sense.
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Frank Humada, Director of Publishing, 289.695.5422
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