This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief




  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit   e-Store

Home   About   Membership    Practice   Contact  



 



School bans kindergarteners from touching each other
Parent Dish
An elementary school in Aldergrove, B.C., has started a zero-tolerance policy for its kindergarteners, banning them from touching each other. Coghlan Fundamental Elementary School sent a letter home with its students informing parents of the ban. The handout read: "We have unfortunately had to ban all forms of hands-on play for the immediate future... we will have a zero-tolerance policy."
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  


Nutrition screening

Eating well is an important factor in healthy growth and development of children, preventing obesity and chronic disease, and keeping us healthy as we age. Knowing more about healthy eating and taking action to improve eating habits is important.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Critics: Manitoba's child care registry not working
CBC News
More than 11,000 young Manitobans are waiting for day care spots to open up, and child care advocates say being on the provincial government's registry won't help parents secure those spaces sooner. The Manitoba Child Care Association says there are currently 11,145 children across the province who are enrolled in the child care registry, waiting to get into a day care.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


The rise of the new single-income family
Toronto Life
Six years ago, when Daniela Syrovy became pregnant with her first child, she planned to take a maternity leave. She would step away from Clutch, her fledgling public relations business, while her husband, Tim Kelloway, would continue running Big Burger, his Etobicoke restaurant. Then their daughter Suri was born. Daniela, now 33, recalls the moment with perfect clarity.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Licensed or unlicensed; what difference does it make?
The Mississauga News
While it remains true that good unlicensed child care services exist, there are numerous risks involved with selecting a child care service that is unregulated by Ministry guidelines and imposed standards. Namely, child to caregiver ratios, programming, nutrition options and general safety are all left unmonitored if the choice to use an unlicensed child care provider is made.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLE
FEATURED ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Enhancing your day care program to meet the needs of a variety of ages
Etobicoke Guardian
You've taken the plunge and opened your own day care! Advertised, placed relevant information on your Facebook and LinkedIn profiles and spread the word. The good news is: you are enrolling children and are close to hitting capacity! The stressful part? Managing a program that offers a wide variety of activities and fun for the children who vary in ages.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
The rise of the new single-income family
Toronto Life
Six years ago, when Daniela Syrovy became pregnant with her first child, she planned to take a maternity leave. She would step away from Clutch, her fledgling public relations business, while her husband, Tim Kelloway, would continue running Big Burger, his Etobicoke restaurant. Then their daughter Suri was born. Daniela, now 33, recalls the moment with perfect clarity.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Full-day kindergarten is failing our children
Maclean's
Today, most governments want more kindergarten, not less. Even the traditional half-day programs aren't enough. Five-year-olds in British Columbia, Quebec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island all attend full-day kindergarten. Ontario is currently in the fourth year of a five-year rollout for full-day junior and senior kindergarten, meaning kids as young as three attend school all day, five days a week.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


Report: B.C. wasted $66 million on failed aboriginal child welfare reforms
The Vancouver Sun
It is a "colossal failure of public policy" that not one child benefited from the provincial government spending $66 million over 12 years in failed efforts to improve the Aboriginal child welfare system, B.C.'s youth advocate says. A scathing new report from the Representative for Children and Youth admonishes the government and some native groups for money wasted on plans to change how social services are delivered to vulnerable children.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Adding a musical touch to child care in Oakville
Oakville Beaver
Want something more than just a babysitter? Come to Learning Ladder Childcare and fill your child's life with music and creativity. When you're looking for a child care program, you want a space that offers safe, healthy and loving environment combined with a curriculum as special as your child.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Society must close after school care program or risk folding
The Coast Reporter
The Halfmoon Bay Childcare Centre Society must close its after-school care program at the end of this month or risk closing the day care as well. "It's purely financial. We don't have enough families utilizing the program and with all the government cuts to funding, child care it's not sustainable," said day care manager Jen Hoile. The society's after-school care program was well used when kindergarten was only half day, but Hoile said when it changed to full day a couple of years ago, the program "took a hit."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Toronto's 'Let's Talk Child Care' campaign starts (Toronto Star)
Multigenerational family living can offer added comforts at home (The Waterloo Region Record)
How to ensure child care investments pay off (The Globe and Mail)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


North Vancouver day care expansion rejected
North Shore News
Little Bunnies hopped into a brick wall, as District of North Vancouver council voted to deny the day care's expansion. The West Kings Road child care facility was hoping to double its enrollment from 10 to 20 children, but council kiboshed the application after hearing from neighbours who feel deluged by day cares. "I believe that our neighbourhood has done more than its share accommodating already 36 day care spaces," said James Gill, who lives adjacent to Little Bunnies Learning Centre.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Adoption centre supports watchdog's call for children's rights
Global News
The B.C. representative for children and youth, Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond, says more needs to be done for adopted children's rights in Saskatchewan. Members of Saskatchewan's Adoption Support Centre are welcoming the watchdog's advocacy, hoping it will lead to change. Happy, healthy children and teens gathered at Saskatoon's Shaw Centre with their adopted families to celebrate their success stories with a 5-kilometre walk.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Balancing work, motherhood means getting into the day care business
Toronto Star
Tanya Dodaro was holding her second infant daughter, editing a news release and worrying about child care when she had a revelation. Dodaro, who began a public relations company 10 years ago with her sister-in-law, recalls that life became hectic enough after her first daughter, Lea, was born four and a half years ago. At the time Dodara and her husband, Mark, hired a nanny for a year, then put Lea in a Montessori school.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


 
Interaction.ca
Frank Humada, Director of Publishing, 289.695.5422
Download media kit

Siobhan Cole, Senior Content Editor, 289.695.5414   
Contribute news

This edition of Interaction.ca was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here.
Recent Issues:
Nov. 13, 2013
Nov. 6, 2013
Oct. 30, 2013



50 Minthorn Blvd., Suite 800, Thornhill, ON, L3T 7X8