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 Industry Headlines


Government looking at changes to Nutrition North food subsidy
CBC News
It appears the Conservative government is open to the idea of changing the way it tries to offset the high cost of food in the North. The department that oversees the beleaguered Nutrition North program has posted a notice of proposed procurement for someone to come up with different ways of providing northerners with the federal food subsidy.
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As more Canadians pass on fast food, McDonald's tries to get fitter
Global News
It might just be the beginning of the end for fast food as we know it. McDonald’s, the world’s largest burger chain, said that sales at U.S. restaurants fell another 1.7 per cent in the latest three month stretch, furthering an emerging trend in North America of declining traffic at it and other fast-food restaurants. While Illinois-based McDonald’s doesn’t break out Canadian numbers, global sales were also down just under one per cent compared to the same period last year, the chain said, “reflecting negative guest traffic.”
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SPONSORED CONTENT


Food security project going global
University of Guelph
A University of Guelph research project that has already improved the livelihoods of small-scale Asian farmers will further expand worldwide, thanks to more than $4.2 million in federal support announced this afternoon. The project involves innovative packaging developed in part by Guelph researchers using nanotechnology to improve the shelf life of mangoes, a major fruit crop in much of the world. Already, the technology has helped to significantly reduce post-harvest losses in Sri Lanka and India.
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New task force to improve Canada's risk management programmes
The Poultry Site
The Manitoba government is establishing a new task force to evaluate existing programmes and policies used to help farmers recover from climate-related challenges such as flooding, with the goal of identifying more comprehensive and sustainable programmes, Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, said Minister Ron Kostyshyn.
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  14th International Rapeseed Congress (IRC 2015)
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Canadians cry 'fowl' over lack of ethnic chicken, document shows
Toronto Star
Some people have been crying foul over the lack of ethnic chicken in Canada. Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz got an earful from customers who couldn't find particular poultry, a newly released document shows.
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Method to 'unboil eggs' could slash food production costs
Food Navigator
A team of chemists that have figured out a way to 'unboil' egg whites say that their development could dramatically reduce food production costs. The method, which enables researchers to unlink and refold proteins in their original state is described in the journal ChemBioChem – with the authors behind the study suggesting that the innovation could dramatically reduce costs for medical treatments, food production and other segments of the $160 billion global biotechnology industry.
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Green tea ingredient may target protein to kill oral cancer cells
Penn State
A compound found in green tea may trigger a cycle that kills oral cancer cells while leaving healthy cells alone, according to Penn State food scientists. The research could lead to treatments for oral cancer, as well as other types of cancer. Earlier studies had shown that epigallocatechin-3-gallate — EGCG — a compound found in green tea, killed oral cancer cells without harming normal cells, but researchers did not understand the reasons for its ability to target the cancer cells, said Joshua Lambert, associate professor of food science and co-director of Penn State's Center for Plant and Mushroom Foods for Health.
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Global mushroom market grows exponentially
Food Mag
The mushroom market was valued at $29,427.92 million in 2013 and is projected to reach $50,034.12 million by 2019. The market is being driven by the rise in consumption of processed food, rise in consumer awareness about health & wellness, cultivation and continuous R&D & innovations to expand applicability and accelerate growth.
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Peanut allergy researchers say they may have found key to a cure
The Guardian
Australian researchers have found a possible key to a cure for people with potentially fatal peanut allergies. A Melbourne-based study has already transformed the lives of many of the children who took part in the clinical trial. Researchers from the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute gave about 30 allergic children a daily dose of peanut protein together with a probiotic in an increasing amount over an 18-month period.
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Professor develops synthetic alcohol
The Drinks Business
Professor David Nutt, a neuropsychopharmacology professor at London’s Imperial College, has developed two drugs that could eliminate hangovers and wean those who drink to excess off alcohol to prevent damage to their health. As reported by The Telegraph, “alcosynth” is a non-toxic inebriant that mimics the effects of alcohol, but removes the risks of hangovers and liver damage.
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TRENDING ARTICLE
FEATURED ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Thinking outside the can
TIME
At the Campbell’s Soup headquarters in Camden, N.J., CEO Denise Morrison is taking me on a tour of the company store, where employees Duncan buy products at a discount. Morrison breezes quickly past the items Campbell's is best known for: the classic red-and-white cans of condensed tomato soup, Pepperidge Farm breads and Goldfish, and Prego spaghetti sauces.

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Government looking at changes to Nutrition North food subsidy
CBC News
It appears the Conservative government is open to the idea of changing the way it tries to offset the high cost of food in the North. The department that oversees the beleaguered Nutrition North program has posted a notice of proposed procurement for someone to come up with different ways of providing northerners with the federal food subsidy.

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Unlocking taste: Desire, disgust, and why it's okay to hate Brussels sprouts
The Globe and Mail
Remember that tongue diagram you learned in school? The one divided into sweet, sour, bitter and salty zones, with each occupying very distinct territory? It’s categorically wrong. This is just one idea debunked by Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist John McQuaid in his new book Tasty: The Art and Science of What We Eat, as he deconstructs the maddeningly elusive worlds of taste and flavour.

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5 amazing ways 3-D-printed food will change the way we eat
The Washington Post
Journey to the frontier of food and you’ll find a 3-D printer, spewing out chocolate. While traditional cooking isn’t going anywhere, you can count on 3-D-printed foods eventually finding a place in our world. Researchers around the world are fiddling with ways to use 3-D printers to make food. Their efforts could one day aid nutrition and sustainability. So far most of the work is in printing sugar and chocolate.
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Quinoa: the new ancient superfood
Grainews
Quinoa has been cultivated for thousands of years. During that time it has been variously revered as sacred, relied on to feed a people and it has also been misunderstood and under-appreciated. Quinoa can be grown in many geographies given the right conditions, but its origins are high up in the Andes Mountains of South America.
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Oatmeal for breakfast may increase satiety and mean a lower calorie lunch
Food Navigator
Consumption of oatmeal, rather than ready-to-eat-cereal, at breakfast may result in greater feelings of fullness and lower calorie intake at lunch, especially in overweight people, says research backed by PepsiCo owned Quaker Oats. The research, published in Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, investigated how different breakfasts affect feelings of fullness and later appetite and food intake by comparing the effects of quick-cook oatmeal, sugared corn flakes and water in a small group of healthy weight and overweight individuals.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    How science is racing to end the chocolate shortage (Hamilton Spectator)
Convenience is key for men to eat healthy (Canadian Grocer)
Generational change drives wine industry innovation (ABC.net)
In food fight, Canada's discount supermarkets ate Target's lunch (Global News)

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