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Non-CIFST articles and advertisements, as well as their claims, do not represent the viewpoints/opinions of the Canadian Institute of Food Science and Technology (CIFST). CIFST is not responsible for grammatical errors, misspelled words, unclear syntax or errors in translations in original sources.

Cancer fighting purple tomatoes harvested in Leamington
CBC News
A crop of genetically modified purple tomatoes designed to fight cancer has been grown and harvested in a greenhouse in Leamington, ON. The purple tomatoes have been genetically modified to have a higher amount of anthocyanins, an antioxidant found in blueberries, blackberries and plums. It's what gives those fruit their purple colours. Anthocyanins are also said to fight cancer.
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CFS Profile: Narayan Prasad Ghimire, CFS
CIFST
Narayan Prasad Ghimire is a Certified Food Scientist (CFS) and Team Leader at Flavorcan International Inc. in Scarborough, Ontario. As a CFS, Ghimire is one of a distinguished group of nearly 1500 global food professionals with this certification. Ghimire is leveraging the CFS to network and sharing his ideas with the profession.
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Canada threatens court fight, import tariffs over U.S. food labelling
CityNews
Canada's agriculture minister says he's hoping to avoid an all-out trade war with the United States over food labelling. But Gerry Ritz warns that, if there is a war, he's prepared to fight it. Ritz has launched a last-minute appeal to American lawmakers to change U.S. food labelling rules through a 950-page Farm Bill that could come to a first vote as early as tomorrow.
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Food industry fights red tape burden that's costing $657 million a year
Financial Post
When Laurie Thompson wanted to expand her hand-made Belgian chocolates business to include her own packaged-goods line for retail and wholesale, she sought out information about product labelling from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. "I didn't know where to even look for it," said Ms. Thompson, owner of Chelsea Chocolates in Barrie, ON. "A lady said they would send information and never did."
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CFIA: Seizure of British foods an isolated incident
CBC News
The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has shed a little more light on why shipments of popular British food products were seized from a Saskatchewan shop, sending worried customers across the country to stock up. Saskatoon shop owner Tony Badger said earlier this week he was forced to remove Irn-Bru, Marmite and other British products from his shelves because the CFIA told him they contain products not allowed in Canada.
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CFIB: Cost of complying with federal food safety rules and paperwork hits $657 million annually
The Vancouver Sun
A new report suggests it costs Canadian farmers and the agriculture industry $657 million a year to comply with food inspection rules. The figure from the Canadian Federation of Independent Business is based on a survey of agri-businesses across the country. The CFIB also says only one-in-five agri-business owners believe the Canadian Food Inspection Agency provides "good overall service."
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Study finds aesthetics in food packaging as important as brand names
Ottawa Citizen
A University of Calgary study suggests wrapping food up in a pretty package is as likely to influence a child's food choice as a brand name like McDonald's. Prof. Charlene Elliott's study builds on one done by Stanford University a few years ago. The Stanford study found that preschoolers thought foods wrapped in a McDonald’s wrapper tasted better than the identical food presented in a plain wrapper.
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New store will sell 'expired' food
HLN
Doug Rauch wants to sell you food that is past its sell-by date. Rauch, former president of retail grocery chain Trader Joe's, is trying to do more than just use food that would be wasted — he's trying to completely change the way we handle our food both at home and in stores. A recent study by Harvard reports that up to 40 per cent of food in America is wasted, and a huge reason is because food labels and sell-by dates are confusing.
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Halifax food truck rules may soon shift
The Chronicle Herald
Halifax regional council may be close to voting on a revised bylaw regulating the growing local food truck scene after CAO Richard Butts cancelled a tender call for five locations around the city. The tender call for five-year leases in the several spots that food trucks can operate was shelved, indicating that a new bylaw is in the offing, said Natalie Chavarie, co-chair of the Food Truck Association of Nova Scotia.
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Chocolate finds a new friend in yeast
Confectionery News
Researchers claim that yeasts produced during cacao bean fermentation are essential to the final quality of chocolate. Before it was not properly understood whether yeasts produced during fermentation had any impact on the quality of the cacao beans that go on to make chocolate. But researchers from the University of New South Wales, led by Graham Fleet, claim that without yeasts at fermentation chocolate tastes acid and lacks its characteristic flavor. Their findings have been published in the International Journal of Food Microbiology.
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Africa's biggest coffee exporter thinks it may be time to develop drought resistant coffee beans
Salon
The effects of climate change are already being felt in Uganda. Citing low rainfall, the east African nation is expecting to export fewer beans — its top export — than usual this year, and it wants to prepare before the problem gets worse. "We have to have [coffee] varieties that are adaptable to climate change," Henry Ngabirano, managing director of the state-run Uganda coffee development authority (UCDA), told Reuters.
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Study: Aerated foods could help increase satiety
Food Navigator
Increasing the amount of air in foods by creating highly aerated products could help to increase satiety and reduce intake, according to new research. Findings from researchers in Spain suggest that creating new food products that contain more air in them may help industry to increase the satiating effects of their products. Writing in the International Journal of Gastronomy and Food Science, the team combined findings from science and chefs to demonstrate a practical way to design satiating new products using food grade ingredients.
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Research has revealed that Sensus oligofructose can be used to improve the taste profile of stevia, providing new opportunities for the food industry to create tasty, naturally sweetened products. Sensus investigated the sensory characteristics of stevia in combination with Frutalose® oligofructose syrup.

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Canada threatens court fight, import tariffs over U.S. food labelling
CityNews
Canada's agriculture minister says he's hoping to avoid an all-out trade war with the United States over food labelling. But Gerry Ritz warns that, if there is a war, he's prepared to fight it. Ritz has launched a last-minute appeal to American lawmakers to change U.S. food labelling rules through a 950-page Farm Bill that could come to a first vote as early as tomorrow.

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The 5 weirdest food trends to watch for in 2014
Toronto Life
Earlier this month, the American National Restaurant Association released its culinary forecast for 2014. The purpose of the report, which is based on a survey of over 1,300 American chefs, is to predict the food trends that will dominate restaurant menus in the upcoming year. While a few of this year's findings are intriguing — Peruvian, for instance, is predicted to overtake Korean as the ethnic cuisine of choice — the takeaways are hardly Earth-shattering.

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Time to re-invent the potato chip
Bakery and Snacks
Noodle pots, bagels, pizza slices, yogurts, soups — you name it — have muscled into the snack space. So what hope do old-fashioned potato chip, popcorn and nut makers really have? The "snackification of everything" — a phrase coined by healthy foods consultant Julian Mellentin – never rang so true.
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U.K.: PepsiCo ventures into popped snacks market
Just-food.com
PepsiCo has announced the launch of Walkers Pops, a lower-fat popped potato snack, in the U.K. The popped snacks swap the usual frying method for an air-popping process that, PepsiCo claims, means they are a healthier alternative to conventionally produced chips.
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Polyphenol use rises 69 per cent in 5 years
Bakery and Snacks
Polyphenol use in functional food and drink marketing has shot up 69 per cent since 2009 even as consumer understanding remains low and approved global health claims extremely limited. But can it continue? The 69 per cent figure is backed by a 38 per cent rise in the use of the term "antioxidants" on food and drink products even if just in the ingredient listing over the same 5-year period, according to market analyst, Mintel.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Canada sued over approval of "toxic" GMO salmon (Grist)
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Nestlé files patent for sweet potato cereal inclusions
Bakery and Snacks
Nestlé has developed a method to manufacture crunchy, extruded purple sweet potato puffs to use in breakfast cereal and cereal bars. The breakfast cereal giant filed the international patent to cover the dry-mix of ingredients used and the extrusion processing parameters.
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Caramel colors under fire again: Is there a safe level of 4-MeI?
Confectionery News
The FDA says it has "no reason to believe" that 4-MeI — an impurity generated during the manufacture of caramel colors III and IV — poses a health risk at current dosage levels, but says it is reviewing new data to determine whether it needs to revise its opinion. Its comments came as product testing firm Consumer Reports published results of tests* showing what it claimed to be "concerning" levels of 4-MeI (4-Methylimidazole) in soft drinks and called on the FDA to set federal limits well below those already enshrined in California's Proposition 65 list.
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Study: Quinoa safe for celiacs
Food Navigator
Regular consumption of quinoa appears to be safe for people with celiac disease, according to research published in The American Journal of Gastroenterology. Quinoa, a gluten-free ancient grain, is often recommended as part of traditional gluten-free diets, but previous laboratory studies had indicated it might not be good for celiac patients.
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