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 CIFST News


Supplier Expo Manitoba — Last call for Exhibitors' Registration
CIFST
Don’t miss this excellent opportunity for displaying products and services to a growing market in the Canadian Prairies. Registration to exhibit at Supplier Expo closes on Friday April 17, 2015 Register now at http://www.cifst.ca/default.asp?ID=873
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 Industry Headlines


Fewer U.S. children are eating fast food, survey shows
The Globe and Mail
Between 2003 and 2010, the number of U.S. kids eating fast food on any given day went down, and the calories from some types of fast foods have declined as well, according to a new study. "Most prior studies have focused on menu items, but this (one) actually looked at what children are eating," said co-author Colin Rehm, formerly of the University of Washington in Seattle and now of Tufts University in Medford, Mass.
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SPONSORED CONTENT


Are your shoppers buzzing about 'free-from' foods?
Progressive Grocer
If so, it's no surprise — consumer demand is growing for products that are free from ingredients such as gluten, allergens, GMOs, artificial flavors and preservatives, added sugars and unhealthy fats. In fact, almost 13 percent of global food and beverage introductions in 2013 included a free-from claim, up 3 percent over the previous five years, according to What's In Store 2015 by the International Dairy-Deli-Bakery Association
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Don't mess with the bean
Canadian Grocer
Anyone thirsty for a double shot, half-caffeinated, extra foam peppermint mocha? No? Complicated drink orders may still appeal to Starbucks snobs, but a back-to-basics approach is what's percolating in the coffee category.
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Jamie Oliver wants Canada to do more for healthy eating
Canadian Grocer
Jamie Oliver, Britain's celebrity chef, has thrown down the gauntlet –or maybe it's an oven mitt–to Canadian politicians to join his international campaign for mandatory diet education in rich countries. The television star and best-selling author and pitchman for Sobeys, says it is time for Canadian politicians to do something about their country's number one killer: diet-related disease.
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Processed foods the biggest chunk of calories in U.S.
U.S. News
Highly processed foods account for more than 60 percent of the calories in products Americans routinely buy in grocery stores, a new study finds. These foods tend to have more fat, sugar and salt than less-processed foods, the researchers said.
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Canadian Food Inspection Agency disputes union comments on food safety
Global News
The Canadian Food Inspection Agency says comments made this week by the union representing Canada's meat inspectors are unnecessarily undermining confidence in the country's food safety system. A news release signed by president Bruce Archibald says the agency is proud that Canada's food safety system has been rated No. 1 out of 17 countries in the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development by the Conference Board of Canada.
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World Health Day 2015: From farm to plate, make food safe
WHO
New data on the harm caused by foodborne illnesses underscore the global threats posed by unsafe foods, and the need for coordinated, cross-border action across the entire food supply chain, according to WHO, which this week is dedicating its annual World Health Day to the issue of food safety.
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Why the changing U.S. grocery retail market underpins the Kraft and Heinz merger
Euromonitor International
On March 25th, 2015 it was announced that Kraft Foods and HJ Heinz would merge, ultimately forming a packaged food power house called the Kraft Heinz Co. This combined company would have a 5.4 per cent value share of the entire US packaged foods market, making it the number one company in the space with nearly US$20 billion in sales. This merger is primarily a response to a changing grocery landscape which prioritizes cost efficiencies, given the emphasis on low prices for the consumer.
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'New wave' of GMOs: pink pineapples, purple tomatoes
The Associated Press
With recent government approval of potatoes that don't bruise and apples that don't brown, a new generation of genetically modified foods is headed to grocery shelves. What could be next? Cancer-fighting pink pineapples, heart-healthy purple tomatoes and less fatty vegetable oils, among other products, could receive government approval in the coming years.
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Face the facts — trust trumps science for many consumers
Alberta Farm Express
When it comes to talking about agriculture, a "just the facts" approach doesn't cut it anymore. Attitudes towards the food industry have changed and those in agriculture have to adopt new tactics to reach out to consumers, said Charlie Arnot of the Center for Food Integrity.
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TRENDING ARTICLE
FEATURED ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Can cultural differences affect consumer understanding of food labels?
Food Navigator
Country-specific differences could influence consumers' understanding of nutritional information on food products, researchers have said.

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Where in the world are the GMOs?
Vancouver Sun
The growth of genetically engineered food crops has been strong in a handful of nations, but may be slowing as the technology bumps up against unreceptive governments, especially in Africa and Europe, according to a new report by the Canadian Biotechnology Action Network.

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What does the Heinz-Kraft merger mean for Canada?
Canadian Grocer
A merger between H.J. Heinz Co. and Kraft Foods is expected to generate about $1.5 billion in cost savings, but the companies say it's too early to say whether they will shutter any of their Canadian operations.

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Biodome could be future of food
Star Phoenix
The 280-square-metre plastic bubble in Tom Colclough's Surrey yard is packed with 6,000 strawberry plants that require no soil and use one tenth the water of conventional farming. Canada's first agricultural "biodome" is made from airtight layers of ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE), a plastic film that weighs 99 per cent less than glass and naturally disperses light within the dome, creating an ideal environment for vertical hydroponic growing systems, said designer Colclough.
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U.S. businesses seek trade peace with Canada
Orangeville Banner
Business interests are pleading with the U.S. Congress to avert a trade war with Canada that could squeeze Florida orange-growers, put a cork in California wine exports and sour the sales of American chocolate.
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Fresh organic foods shaping Metro supermarket makeover
The Globe and Mail
A slice of foodie culture has arrived at Metro Inc.'s newest supermarket, which features a lush wall of veggies, dozens of exotic cheeses, a slow-cooking rotisserie, a sushi bar and organic offerings. Think Mimolette D'Isigny cheese from France for $99.99 a kilogram.
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Better than veggie: Eat chicken to fight climate change
Food Navigator
We have vegetarian, pescetarian, fruitatarian, vegan… and pollo-tarian? Ditching beef and dairy for poultry products is the best diet to combat climate change, according to new research.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    What does the Heinz-Kraft merger mean for Canada? (Canadian Grocer)
Heinz-Kraft deal: The stories behind the brands (Food Manufacturing)
Product of the Year winners announced (Canadian Grocer)
Maple syrup made healthier with prebiotic, say researchers (CBC News)
The best food for your brain might be your breakfast (Huffington Post)
Warming climate could change how food tastes (Popular Science)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


The vitamin D dilemma: How much should we be taking?
The Globe and Mail
True, it was a painful winter. We were stuck in a cocoon of cold (some of us still are) with limited daylight to lift our winter-weary spirits. So maybe we shouldn't be surprised that vitamin D has emerged as a central point of controversy. In a country with little, if any, opportunity to synthesize the vitamin in fall and winter, the seasons with the least amount of sunlight, we should know just how much of the sunshine supplement we really need.
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Food safety is good for business
Quality Assurance and Food Safety
For food safety professionals, the first order of the job is to think about the safety and quality of the product. But, said US Foods Senior Vice President of Food Safety and Quality Jorge Hernandez, "Food safety, and the systems that provide for an infrastructure of safe food products, is often seen more as a cost of doing business rather than a source of positive impact to the business."
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Food safety's smallest challenge: Microbes
Food Processing
In the never-ending struggle to keep food safe and microbes at bay, the operation sometimes is a success but the patient dies. Such was the case with Hot Mama's Foods. Hot Mama's had tapped into a bull market for its private label hummus, salsa and dips. In 2013, the two-plant processor racked up sales of $33.3 million, a 15 per cent increase from the previous year. Four-fifths of sales were to Trader Joe's and Target, which marketed the products under its Archer Farms name.
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Food in space: Defying (micro)gravity to feed our astronauts
Quality Assurance and Food Safety
When developing food and beverages for astronauts who will be in space for months at a time, microgravity conditions, extended shelf-life, and nutritional requirements must all be primary considerations. But, even with all such aspects met, if the taste or texture of the food is unappealing, the astronauts will not eat enough. And that will result in weight and bone density loss, which can impact both their health and their performance.
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FDA to withdraw approval for arsenic-based drug used in poultry
Food Safety News
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced Wednesday that it has received a letter of commitment from Zoetis Animal Health that, by this coming fall, the company will suspend the sale of Histostat (nitarsone) and formally request that FDA withdraw approval for the drug by the end of the year.
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