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McGill students awarded $1 million Hult Prize for plan to transform insects into food
National Post
A team of McGill MBA students pitching a plan to transform insects into a viable food source has won a prestigious prize that came with $1 million to help their project along. The students — Mohammed Ashour, Gabriel Mott, Shobhita Soor, Jesse Pearlstein and Zev Thompson — were announced as winners of the Hult Prize competition in New York City. The prize, presented by former U.S. president Bill Clinton, is awarded as support for business plans designed to do social good.
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Invitation to participate in the CFIA's Integrated Food Labelling / Regulatory Modernization Face-to-Face Session
CFIA
The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is inviting you to participate in our integrated Food Labelling / Regulatory Modernization face-to-face engagement session that will be held on Oct. 22, 2013 in Toronto, ON. In order to be more efficient, the Food Labelling Modernization initiative will be partnering with other modernization initiatives for these sessions (specifically, the Regulatory Modernization and the proposed Imported Food Sector Product Regulations). These initiatives are important parts of the Agency's transformation agenda.
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Blueberries and red grapes may boost immunity
Canoe.ca
A study announced recently has found that chemicals in red grapes and blueberries may boost your body's immune system. Researchers from Oregon State University looked at the impact of 446 different chemicals on the human immune system. Findings published in the journal Molecular Nutrition and Food Research showed that two compounds, resveratrol found in red grapes and pterostilbene found in blueberries, when combined with vitamin D, could boost the body's ability to fend off illness.
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SPONSORED CONTENT


Niagara food inspection reports are a click away
Niagara Falls Review
Ever wonder what really goes on in the kitchens of the restaurants you eat at? Are the countertops really clean? Is the food really stored properly? Does the chef wash his or her hands? Maybe it's best not to ask those sorts of questions for the sake of your appetite, but for the past several years curious Niagara diners have been able to take a peek at health inspection reports with the click of a computer mouse.
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In today's frozen meals, convenience and taste trump all
Canadian Grocer
The dreaded frozen TV dinner, once maligned for simply satiating hunger, with little attention to flavour or health, is making a comeback. For consumers seeking healthy, convenient and tasty meals, "frozen" isn't such a bad word anymore. Food manufacturers such as Nestlé are giving the frozen entree category some yum! with a sharper focus on taste and variety. But good taste can be tough to deliver in frozen meals.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
 
Food Quality Analyzers

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Fast-food giant hopes its new lower-calorie offering Satisfries
The Province
Burger King wants people to feel less guilty about gobbling up its french fries. The world's No. 2 hamburger chain launched a new crinkle-cut French fry on recently that it says has about 20 per cent fewer calories than its regular french fries. The chain says a small order of the new Satisfries clocks in at 270 calories because of a new batter that doesn't absorb as much oil. By comparison, a small order of its regular fries has 340 calories.
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Study: Diet heavy in fruits, vegetables protects mental health, while fast food may invite depression
National Post
A diet rich in fruits and vegetables will not only lead to a slimmer figure and better physical health, it may also lower the risk of depression according to new study. And while fast food that may be momentarily satisfying, burgers, fries, shakes and other high-fat, high-sugar foods were additionally shown to increase the likelihood of experiencing depression. The study, out of the University of Eastern Finland, examined the eating habits of more than 2,000 middle-aged or older men for up to two decades.
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Pumpkin-flavoured latte coming to McDonald's
Toronto Star
And you thought the neon green Shamrock Shake was scary. Well now the "Golden Arches" is aiming to spook the premium coffee competition with something distinctly orange and round that has a warmly familiar flavour in the fall. McDonald's Canada is the latest to carve into the lucrative pumpkin-flavoured latte market that java giant Starbucks has made so successful over the last decade.
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  PRODUCT SHOWCASES
Your product, our expertise, your success.


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To find out how to feature your company in CIFST directions and other advertising opportunities, Contact Joseph Gonzales at 289-695-5420

More info


Researchers: Carbonation alters our perception of sweetness
Beverage Daily
Carbonation alters the brain's perception of sweetness and makes it difficult for the brain to determine the difference between sugar and artificial sweeteners, a new study has found. An essential component of many soft drinks, carbonation could affect the way we perceive the sweet tastes of such drinks — and could help to "disguise" zero-calorie sweeteners as sugar.
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The facts behind low calorie sweetener consumption
Food Navigator
Sweeteners are widely used to replace sugar in diet and low calorie products within the food and beverage industry. However, many consumers are still worried about these ingredients. So, what are the facts behind low calorie sweeteners? While there is much evidence to show that consumption of low- or zero-calorie sweeteners can help in weight management, there is also a vast amount of confusion caused by contradicting reports that suggest such sweeteners may have negative effects.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    My Certified Food Scientist (CFS) Journey (CIFST)
The least healthy breakfast sandwich (Yahoo!)
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Abstract submission is now open for IUFoST 2014 — 17th World Congress of Food Science & Technology (CIFST)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Think you know your celiac consumer? Think again
Bakery and Snacks
Celiac consumers care first and foremost about value for money; significantly ahead of sensory properties like taste and texture, finds new Leatherhead research. Leatherhead Food Research conducted a 310-strong survey in the U.K. among celiac consumers to find out what their priorities are when it comes to buying gluten-free products. Eighty-four per cent of respondents said value for money was the most needed improvement to gluten-free products.
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TRENDING ARTICLE
FEATURED ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Mapping out the new food regulatory landscape for Canada
CFIA
In November last year, the "Safe Food for Canadians Act" received Royal Assent, effectively paving the way for broad changes and improvements for food safety in Canada. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is currently consulting on a range of modernization initiatives and will conduct an interactive workshop on October 21st in an effort to bring developments towards the implementation of the Act into limelight and share its recommendations with the industry stakeholders.

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McGill students awarded $1 million Hult Prize for plan to transform insects into food
National Post
A team of McGill MBA students pitching a plan to transform insects into a viable food source has won a prestigious prize that came with $1 million to help their project along. The students — Mohammed Ashour, Gabriel Mott, Shobhita Soor, Jesse Pearlstein and Zev Thompson — were announced as winners of the Hult Prize competition in New York City. The prize, presented by former U.S. president Bill Clinton, is awarded as support for business plans designed to do social good.

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How do store brand groceries compare to name brands?
CTV News
There are more store brands in grocery stores than ever before, but which ones really stack up against big-name national brands? Consumer Reports put some products to the test to see if you can really taste the difference. Buying store brands can save you anywhere from 15 to 30 per cent on average. Consumer Reports tested 57 store brand foods from major retailers including Costco, Walmart, Target and Whole Foods.

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Ex-Trader Joe's exec to open expired food store
Yahoo!
The former president of Trader Joe's has found a solution to the billions of dollars of food thrown out every year by American consumers: he's going to sell it. Having overseen the popular American supermarket from 2006 to 2008, Doug Rauch knows first-hand just how misleading the "use by" labels on packaged foods can be for consumers. As Time magazine reported last week, more than 90 per cent of Americans believe the expiration date on foods refers to the day the product is no longer safe to eat, when in reality those dates are tools for retailers, indicating when foods are at peak freshness.
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Love for organic, or hate of conventional: What drives consumer choice?
Food Navigator
As consumer demand for local and organic products grow, new research asks whether it a love for these characteristics or a hate for 'conventional' food is driving purchases. But as the number of food labels continues to expand, understanding how consumers process label information and use it in purchase decisions has become more and more complex. A new study aims to understand how two labels with distinct but potentially complementary characteristics — local and organic — interact.
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Bitter sweet: Rising dark chocolate consumption drives up price
Confectionery News
Rising dark chocolate consumption is driving up prices, according to data from Euromonitor International, with China, Switzerland and the U.S. having the highest retail value. Dark chocolate generally requires more cocoa beans per ounce to make than milk chocolate, meaning even marginal shifts in chocolate habits can have big price impacts. Euromonitor International said that the cost of one kilogram of chocolate in the U.S. will increase by 45 per cent to $12.25 this year.
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