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Non-CIFST articles and advertisements, as well as their claims, do not represent the viewpoints/opinions of the Canadian Institute of Food Science and Technology (CIFST). CIFST is not responsible for grammatical errors, misspelled words, unclear syntax or errors in translations in original sources.

Conference Board adds to growing calls for national food strategy
Ottawa Citizen
At a time when Canadians waste an estimated $27 billion of food every year, but 70 per cent of preschoolers in Nunavut don't always have enough to eat, a growing chorus is calling for a national strategy on food. That could include everything from a year-round nutrition program in every school — something most other developed countries have — to ramping up Canadian agriculture to make the country a world powerhouse.
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Booze in B.C. grocery stores? Not just yet
CBC News
Premier Christy Clark says she's trying to get the mix right before British Columbia permits the sale of beer and wine in grocery stores. During a news conference in West Kelowna, Clark said she's aware British Columbians support the convenience of beer-and-wine sales in grocery stores by a four-to-one margin, but suggested proposals for allowing beer-and-wine sales in grocery stores still need work.
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Can plants replace eggs? Food tech start-ups aim to do just that
Financial Post
The start-up is housed in a garage-like space in San Francisco's tech-heavy South of Market neighbourhood, but it isn't like most of its neighbours that develop software, websites and mobile-phone apps. Its mission is to find plant replacements for eggs. Inside, research chefs bake cookies and cakes, whip up batches of flavoured mayonnaise and pan-fry omelets and French toast — all without eggs.
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Food scandals of 2013: The chefs, the politics and the cronuts
The Huffington Post
Another year, another chance to demonstrate just how large a role food plays in our lives. Whether it was about the politics, the outrageous creations or the unavoidable celebrity chefs, food was top of mind throughout 2013 (and the holidays will guarantee it'll stay that way for quite a while). We've taken a look at 12 of the biggest food scandals that occurred throughout the year.
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Healthy eating adds $2,000 a year to family grocery bill
CBC News
A family on a healthy diet can expect to pay $2,000 more a year for food than one having less nutritious meals, say researchers who recommend that the cost gap be closed. The research in the issue of British Medical Journal Open reviewed 27 studies from 10 high-income countries to evaluate the price differences of foods and diet patterns.
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Industry urgently needs to focus on food fraud
Food Navigator
The food industry must do more to prevent food fraud, says an interim U.K. government report commissioned to assess food integrity in the wake of the horse meat crisis. The full Elliott Review is due for publication in April, but initial findings, published in a report released recently, found little knowledge of the extent of food fraud along complex supply chains.
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Agriculture bill aims to boost crop varieties, enhance trade and R & D
iPolitics
Nine pieces of Canadian food and farm legislation are facing significant changes with the tabling of the federal government's Agricultural Growth Act. The legislation, Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz said at press conference in Winnipeg, is designed to "modernize" and "streamline" seven acts under the control of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and two monitored by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.
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Study: Father's diet before conception may play role in health of offspring
Times Colonist
It's well-known that what a mother eats before and during pregnancy can affect fetal development, but research now suggests that a father's diet prior to conception may also play a critical role in a newborn's health. Women are advised to get sufficient amounts of vitamin B9, or folate — found in green leafy vegetables, cereals, fruit and meats — to prevent miscarriages or birth defects in their babies.
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RBC: Saskatchewan's economy to benefit from strength in agriculture
Newswire
A solid grain and oilseed harvest this year will boost Saskatchewan's GDP growth to 3.9 per cent in 2013, up from an earlier-estimated 2.7 per cent, according to the latest RBC Economics Provincial Outlook released. "Saskatchewan's three biggest crops — wheat, barley and canola — have played a large role in provincial growth this year with November estimates pointing to an increase of around 42 per cent," said Craig Wright, senior vice-president and chief economist, RBC.
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Luxury food stores make grocery shopping a hot ticket
Toronto Star
Ever since the late visionary Dave Nichol introduced President's Choice back in the 1980s, Loblaws has been a driving force behind our local foodie culture. Part of the impact was the unique product the chain had the smarts to expose us to just as our taste buds were becoming more global (and where would we be now without Decadent cookies and Memories Of...).
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Study: Sugar limits should be halved to protect teeth
Confectionery News
World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations for added sugar intake should be halved to protect teeth from dental caries, suggests a review published in the Journal of Dental Research. The WHO recommends that no more than 10 per cent of calories should come from added sugars for optimal health, but this latest study found that people who consumed less than five per cent of their calories in the form of added sugars had better dental health.
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Healthy food costing too much for the poor
St. Catharines Standard
In a world where daily survival defines how every penny is spent, the future's horizon is no farther away than the end of the week. Nothing can really exist beyond that. Not with a pocket full of lint and an empty stomach. Susan Ellis knows these calculations well. She was once a working woman, earning $1,600 a month. Not a king's ransom, but she says she lived comfortably enough.
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The science of the scoop: Inside ice cream
Medill Reports
It may sound like something out of a Willy Wonka movie, but scientists are studying the microstructure of ice cream to help manufacturers better understand their products. Which could mean better ice cream in the future. University of Wisconsin-Madison Food Science Department researchers look at how changes in ice cream's microstructure — fat globules, air cells and ice crystals — affect the way it acts and tastes.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    What are the greatest agriculture breakthroughs in history? (Western Farm Press)
MP: Food packaging deregulation 'off the table' (CBC News)
The future of cola: Sweet, but not that sweet (Canadian Grocer)
Babies can try allergy-provoking foods as early as 6 months (CBC News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Food flavouring equipment offers even, efficient seasoning
Bakery and Snacks
TNA has launched a closed-loop oiler designed for accurate, even application of oil on a range of foods. The intelli-flav CLO series of closed-loop oiler (CLO) machines is intended for flavouring foods in tumble drums. According to the manufacturer, the equipment capabilities offers features that help boost consistency of seasoning application.
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Foodini prototype food printer a step closer to making Star Trek replicators a reality
Expert Reviews
3D printers have been slowly picking up steam this year, dropping in price dramatically as they reach the high street, but the next step towards Star Trek-style replicators may already be here. The Foodini prototype produces edible creations that creators Natural Machines hope will revolutionize home cooking. Barcelona-based Natural Machines want Foodini to help budding chefs prepare their own food rather than simply rely on packets and ready meals. It uses five capsules to "print" ingredients at different pressures and temperatures using a heating element.
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Scientists: Healthy food policies at risk
The Globe and Mail
Health Canada has stacked its food advisory panels with industry insiders who threaten to derail healthy food initiatives, a new report alleges. A group of scientists and researchers published a critical paper in the journal Open Medicine lambasting the federal government for biasing its advisory panels – groups that routinely advise the department on its food policies – by including too many individuals or researchers who work for or receive funding from food corporations.

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Conference Board adds to growing calls for national food strategy
Ottawa Citizen
At a time when Canadians waste an estimated $27 billion of food every year, but 70 per cent of preschoolers in Nunavut don’t always have enough to eat, a growing chorus is calling for a national strategy on food. That could include everything from a year-round nutrition program in every school — something most other developed countries have — to ramping up Canadian agriculture to make the country a world powerhouse.

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Edmonton will be site for next generation of bio-refining
Edmonton Journal
An Edmonton pilot plant will soon begin producing large amounts of a versatile, top-quality, crystal-clear solvent from just about any biological feedstock that contains fats. And that list is long: canola and other seed oils, grease from restaurants, so-called tall oil from wood pulp plants, and even bio-solids found in the residue of Edmonton's sewage.

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Food firms that tempt cooks and investors alike
The Globe and Mail
Is the bacon you eat bringing home the bacon? Now more than ever, there's an increased public focus on how food makes it to the kitchen table. The trend may have sprung from health and ethics concerns, but it can also serve up a valuable opportunity for equity portfolios.
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Kellogg to close plants in Australia, Canada
Just-food.com
Kellogg is to close plants in Australia and Canada, as it embarks to lower costs and improve efficiency across its business. The company said it will shut a snacks facility in the Australian town of Charmhaven in New South Wales and close a breakfast cereal factory in the London, ON. The Charmhaven plant is expected to close by late 2014. The London facility is set to shut by the end of next year.
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Triffid-free flax seed available for 2014
Portage Online
The Canadian flax industry is close to eliminating Triffid from the seed and grain handling systems. Canadian flax was shut out of its largest market — the European Union — in 2009 after trace levels of the genetically modified variety were found in shipments. The Crop Development Centre in Saskatoon has been working on reconstituting 100 per cent Triffid-free seed supplies since then, explains Todd Hyra, Western Canada business manager with SeCan.
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Organic milk higher in heart-healthy fats, study indicates
Hamilton Spectator
There's no doubt eating organic food can reduce your exposure to pesticides, but the jury remains out on whether organically grown food is inherently more nutritious than food produced using the full chemical armoury of conventional agriculture. Now, new research from Washington State University concludes that when it comes to milk, the organic variety really does have at least one nutritional advantage.
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