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Non-CIFST articles and advertisements, as well as their claims, do not represent the viewpoints/opinions of the Canadian Institute of Food Science and Technology (CIFST). CIFST is not responsible for grammatical errors, misspelled words, unclear syntax or errors in translations in original sources.


With 2013 coming to a close, CIFST would like to wish its members, partners and other industry professionals a very safe and happy holiday season.

As we reflect on the past year, we would like to provide Directions subscribers with a look at the most-read news stories. That means, over the next two weeks, we'll count down the Top 20 articles for the year!

Your regular news publication will resume on Tuesday January 7, 2014.





10. Sodium reduction efforts by the Canadian food industry
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
June 18, 2013: Research has linked high dietary sodium intakes to elevated blood pressure, a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Efforts are underway to raise awareness of this health issue and to lower the amount of sodium consumed by Canadians. The Canadian food industry has voluntarily stepped up its efforts to reduce the sodium content of processed foods. This report outlines some of the recent progress industry has made as well as the related challenges and lessons learned.
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9. CFIA drops "May contain soy" precautionary labelling on some cereal products
Better Farming
Feb. 26, 2013: The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's decision to drop the "may contain soy" precautionary labelling on grain-based foods when a very low level of soy is present, may be an indication that Canada's grain growers, handlers and processors are doing a good job of preventing unwanted soybeans from making their way into other grain products.
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8. Researchers blending to make milk better
University of Guelph
March 26, 2013: Better kinds of milk are the goals of University of Guelph researchers looking to improve production and processing of a Canadian product already known for outstanding quality. Food science professor Milena Corredig, holder of the NSERC/Ontario Dairy Council Chair, belongs to an interdisciplinary research team whose projects start on the farm and end with new dairy products for consumers.
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7. Canada Bread closes Quebec bakery
just-food.com
April 23, 2013: Canada Bread Company has announced plans to shutter its snack cakes bakery in Shawinigan, QC, at the beginning of May. The site currently produces a number of branded snack cakes including Cadbury, Chevalier and Obsession. The closure will affect 74 employees who currently work at the factory.
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6. Kathleen Wynne splits Ontario Agriculture portfolio in surprising twist
Farms.com
Feb. 19, 2013: As anticipated, at the official swearing-in ceremony, Kathleen Wynne became Ontario's first female Premier and she also became Minister of Agriculture. What wasn't so expected was that Kathleen Wynne split the Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs portfolio into two, spinning off the Rural Affairs portion of the portfolio to new comer Jeff Leal, MPP from Peterborough.
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5. La Russie annonce davantage de restrictions sur les importations de la viande canadienne
CTV News via The Canadian Press
16 avril 2013: La Russie s'apprête à imposer de nouvelles restrictions sur les importations de la viande, une décision qui est surveillée de près par les producteurs de porc et de bœuf au Canada. Les lignes directrices devraient être liées à des préoccupations quant à l'utilisation de la ractopamine additive dans l'alimentation du bétail canadien.
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4. Horse meat scandal : Where it began and where are we now?
Food Production Daily
March 5, 2013: The horse meat controversy has rocked Europe and even spread as far as Hong Kong with firms including Nestlé, Ikea and Findus all finding horse DNA in their products. Some of the Europe's — and the world's — biggest industry players have now become caught up in the horse meat story, with product recalls at a high and consumer confidence at a low.
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3. University of Guelph unveils 3 innovations in food science
Canadian Manufacturing
Nov. 12, 2013: The University of Guelph unveiled three new food innovations patented by three of its own food science experts. The GuelphMercury.com reports that representatives from the university and the Ontario Food Cluster introduced the innovations at Anuga, the food trade show that took place in Germany in early October. A university spokesperson said that the university is aiming to be more proactive when it comes to finding solutions to various food processing dilemmas.
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2. What's wrong with ignoring best-before dates?
Calgary Herald
Nov. 5, 2013: It's not always easy to precisely date the items hiding at the back of a fridge. But the Mason jar of peach jam tucked into the far corner of mine was, at the very least, nine years old. I know because it was left behind by my friend Lila, the previous tenant, when she vacated the apartment in the fall of 2004. "I won't throw this out because it's very nice," she said, all those years ago. "Try it." On the question of food safety, I trust my own instincts. And a new Harvard study backs up my strategy.
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1. The dangers of going gluten-free
Maclean's
Sept. 17, 2013: Gluten-free products are a $90 million enterprise in Canada alone, and the sector is expected to grow at least 10 per cent each year through to 2018 — an astounding feat for what is primarily a food-based category. In the United States, the market is valued at $4.2 billion and climbing. A landmark study by researchers at Dalhousie University in Halifax, published in the Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research in 2008, revealed that gluten-free foods were, on average, 242 per cent more expensive than their "regular" counterparts.
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Frank Humada, Director of Publishing, 289.695.5422
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