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Official: Federal government should pay to reroute Lac-Mégantic rail line
Toronto Star
Parti Québécois Leader Pauline Marois is calling on Ottawa to foot the bill if Lac-Mégantic wants to reroute the rail line that runs through the eastern Quebec town, where a runaway train explosion levelled buildings and killed 47 people last summer. "Railways are their responsibility, so it will be up to them to assume the costs incurred if we are to go ahead with the rerouting" said Marois, speaking at an astronomy centre in the Mont-Megantic national park.
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Irving Oil announces voluntary conversion of crude oil railcar fleet
PR Newswire
Irving Oil announced that by April 30, 2014, it will complete the conversion of its proprietary fleet of crude oil railcars to the Association of American Railroads' recommended specifications for DOT-111 railcars constructed after Oct. 1, 2011. This will require the voluntary removal of older-model railcars from service. The AAR specifications recommend that DOT-111 railcars built after October 2011 be constructed with reinforcements and enhancements that have been reported to reduce the risk of product loss if these railcars are involved in derailments. Irving Oil will also advise suppliers and marketers of crude oil of Irving Oil's adoption of AAR's enhanced standard, and will ask for their adherence by no later than Dec. 31, 2014, for crude oil railcars servicing Irving Oil facilities.
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Rail


Harper government acts to get grain moving in Western Canada
Government of Canada
Transport Minister Lisa Raitt and Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz announced concrete measures being taken by the Harper government to move more grain through the transportation system and maintain Canada's reputation as a supplier to world markets. Raitt announced an Order in Council to take immediate effect, setting out minimum volumes of grain that Canadian National Railway Company and Canadian Pacific Railway Company are each required to move. The Order also requires the railways to report to the Minister of Transport on weekly shipments.
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Canadian Pacific CEO defends railway's handling of Western grain backlog
CTV News
Hunter Harrison, the head of Canadian Pacific Railway is taking on critics who say his company hasn't done enough to move a record Western Canadian grain crop to market. In full-page ads in the Globe and Mail and National Post newspapers, Harrison said he wants to "set the record straight" on how the railway has managed shipments during a particularly nasty winter. Canada's two major railways — CP and Montreal-based Canadian National Railway — have been accused of making oil and other products a higher priority than grain.
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Canada oil-by-rail deliveries in 2013 lagged US estimate
Reuters
Far less Canadian oil sands crude reached the Gulf Coast by rail last year than the U.S. State Department had been expecting, according to data that could flavor the final stages of the Keystone XL pipeline debate. In January, the State Department concluded that practically nothing would hamper development of the Canadian oil sands since energy companies could easily move the fuel by rail if TransCanada Corp's pipeline was rejected. Transportation concerns loom large for Western Canada's oil sands sector since the energy patch is vast and productive, but roughly 2,000 miles (3,220 kms) away from the Texas refineries that can turn the commodity into usable fuel.
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TSB: Lac-Mégantic crude as explosive as gasoline
RailwayAge
The crude oil aboard the ill-fated train that destroyed downtown Lac-Mégantic was as explosive as gasoline, Canada's Transportation Safety Board revealed, eight months to the day after the catastrophe that killed 47. The analysis dashes theories that the crude may have been contaminated by hydrogen sulfide or fracking fluids, theories that could have led to focused technical solutions to the crisis of exploding oil trains.
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Trucking


Norm Blagden: 'Invisible industry' needs to better promote its opportunities
Truck News
Trucking is an industry large enough and diverse enough to accommodate the interests and skill sets of virtually everyone. However, because it also happens to be "invisible," those outside of trucking are left unaware of the opportunities within the industry, according to outgoing Manitoba Trucking Association President Norm Blagden. "No matter where an individual's strengths lie, there is opportunity in our industry. However, we now see that we, as an industry group, must go out and tell people of these opportunities," Bladgen said in his President's Report, presented at the annual general meeting of the MTA.
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Truckers serving Canada's largest port go on strike
NASDAQ
Hundreds of container-truck drivers serving Canada's largest port walked off the job, threatening to stall the movement of resources and consumer goods between Canada and Asia. More than 300 unionized container-truck drivers and hundreds more nonunionized drivers working at Port Metro Vancouver went on strike after rejecting a tentative deal with the port.
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Steve Ashton: Infrastructure spending drives development
Truck News
Manitoba has "the best opportunity in a generation" to drive economic growth and that can't be done without significant investments in infrastructure, Manitoba's minister of infrastructure and transport, Steve Ashton, told Manitoba Trucking Association's annual general meeting. "Infrastructure doesn't just follow development; infrastructure drives development," Ashton said at the strongly attended meeting, stressing his desire that Winnipeg live up to its geographic potential as a transportation hub.
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Air


IATA: 'Game changing innovation needed' for air cargo
Canadian Shipper
The International Air Transport Association commenced its 8th World Cargo Symposium in Los Angeles with a call for the average end-to-end transit time to be cut by up to 48 hours by the end of the decade. "In this FIFA World Cup year, we need to move the goal-posts for customer expectations. Cutting average transit times by up to 48 hours by 2020 would make a huge difference to our value proposition, and enable the industry to arrest modal shift, and drive new efficiencies for the business," said Des Vertannes, IATA's Global Head of Cargo in his opening keynote address. This set the tone for a symposium focused on "Transformation through innovation." Currently the average end-to-end time for consignments is around six-to-seven days — a schedule that has not improved since the 1960s.
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Marine


Canada-Korea Free Trade agreement triggers positive, negative reactions
Canadian Shipper
Following the announcement by Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper of the signing of the Canada-Korea Free Trade agreement in Seoul, Korea, Canadian industries have been weighing in with both positive and negative reactions to the pact. Martin Sullivan, president and CEO of Ocean Choice International, said the company is extremely pleased with the announcement of the Canada-Korea Free Trade Agreement. "Asia is the world's fastest growing economic region and seafood imports into this market will provide us with the opportunity to enhance our market presence throughout Korea and all of Asia," said Sullivan.
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CITA News Bulletin
Frank Humada, Director of Publishing, 289.695.5422
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Ryan Clark, Transportation Editor, 202.684.7160   
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