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Canada Border Services Agency announces additional requirements for Courier Low Value Shipment program
Canadian Transportation & Logistics
The Canada Border Services Agency has implemented additional eligibility requirements for participation in the Courier Low Value Shipment (LVS) Program. Participation in the Courier LVS Program is restricted to couriers that are approved Partners In Protection (PIP) members as couriers/carriers; in addition, Courier LVS Program shipments must be imported and transported by approved PIP carriers.
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Imminent IPO for UK's 497-year-old Royal Mail
Journal of Commerce
The U.K. unveiled plans to sell a majority of Royal Mail in a stock market flotation expected to value the 497-year-old state postal service at around £3 billion, or about $4.75 billion (U.S.). The government said an initial public offering on the London Stock Exchange will take place with the amount of shares to be sold dependent on market conditions at the time of the flotation. Ten percent of the shares will be given to Royal Mail's 150,000 employees, which means at least 41 percent of the company will be sold to private and institutional investors.
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Trucking


Trucks carry majority of NAFTA goods, but value of freight drops
Today's Trucking
Recently $93.5 billion of freight moved between the U.S., Canada and Mexico, with trucks hauling the majority of that freight. According to the Bureau of Transportation Statistics of the U.S. Department of Transportation, North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) freight numbers showed that trucks carried 60.7 percent of the $93.5 billion, followed by rail at 15.8 percent, vessels at 8.2 percent, pipelines at 6.5 percent and air at 3.9 percent.
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French-speaking truckers get fast tracked to Saskatchewan
CBC News
It's a loophole. Or, as Denis Prudhomme calls it, "un loophole." For years, drivers have been in short supply, for Saskatchewan's trucking industry. Transport companies often face waits of over a year, to bring immigrant drivers to the prairies. Now, Prudhomme, a longtime trucking veteran, has discovered his French roots can fast-track that process.
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Canada's prepared for the future. Really.
Today's Trucking
Worried about the future? No matter how well your business is performing, no matter how satisfied you may be with your personal fortunes, worry seems impossible to avoid these days. Nothing is assured in 2013. Well, we're here to offer a little encouragement. According to a unique report from Swiss investment advisors RobecoSAM, and they're not fringe players, Canada is better prepared to face an uncertain future than most other countries.
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Rail


Manitoba government says rail plans to transport oil a risky endeavour
Canadian Transportation & Logistics
The Manitoba government says a rail company's plans to start transporting oil across hundreds of kilometres of remote rail line built on permafrost is too risky to the environment and the safety of those who live in the north, said a Canadian Press report. According to the report, NDP Transportation Minister Steve Ashton said in light of the deadly train derailment in Lac-Mégantic, Quebec, Manitoba can't support the shipment of crude oil through its fragile northern environment to the port in Churchill.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

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Freight railroads promote rail as potential career to future job seekers
Canadian Transportation & Logistics
The Association of American Railroads (AAR) recently highlighted the many positive aspects of a railroad career to students from Olive-Harvey College at the Transportation, Distribution and Logistics Expo September 12, held at the Chicago-based college. AAR joined Federal Railroad Administration, City Colleges of Chicago and freight railroad representatives from around the country at the event.
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Air


IATA cuts airlines' profit forecast
Journal of Commerce
A weakening cargo market and economic slowdown in Asia will cut global airlines' profit in 2013 by 8 percent to $11.7 billion, according to the International Air Transport Association. The $1 billion downgrade from a previous forecast in June is also the result of higher oil prices resulting from the conflict in Syria, the industry body said. Total industry revenue is expected to reach $708 billion.
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Airships to ferry goods to Northern Manitoba?
CBC News
Northern Manitoba chiefs are hoping an idea to help their communities avoid the high cost of fresh produce will get lift-off. MKO, the northern chiefs group, wants to explore using airships to ship goods and produce up north, rather than forcing communities to rely on ice roads, which are highly dependent on weather and contribute to the high cost of goods in the north.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
Pipeline vs. rail: Quebec oil train crash reinvigorates transport debate
By Lucy Wallwork
The tragic derailment and explosion of an oil train in Quebec recently has reinvigorated the debate about transport of the U.S. and Canada's new-found fossil...

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Canada ranks 14th in global competitiveness for the 2nd consecutive year
The Conference Board of Canada
Canada ranks 14th overall for the second consecutive year in the 2013-14 Global Competitiveness Report, released by the World Economic Forum (WEF).

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CITA-OTA Shipper-Carrier Forum to meet again
Truck News
According to author David Bradley: One of my favourite TV shows of all-time is Monty Python's Flying Circus (yes I do have a sense of humour). There is one sketch that always made...

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Marine


A freighter makes history
By Alex Binkley
Originally published for Blacklock's Reporter.
A non-descript freighter has made shipping and climate-change history. The Yong Sheng has become the first Asian vessel to complete the passage from China to Europe through the Russian Northeast Passage.

The COSCO freighter transported a cargo of heavy equipment and steel from Shanghai to Rotterdam in 35 days, 13 days shorter than the Suez Canal route. The journey came as a second vessel, the Danish Bulk Carriers' Nordic Orion, attempts a run through Canada's Northwest Passage from Vancouver to Finland. If successful it would become the first bulk carrier to complete the Canadian route since 1969.

John Higginbotham, a former Canadian public servant and senior fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation, said the shipping news points to a need for a coordinated federal approach on Arctic issues.

"There's a gap between what we should do and we do," said Higginbotham, who proposed that cabinet create a separate department devoted solely to Arctic issues.

The mandate is currently managed by the Department of the Environment, and a federal Polar Commission.

Arctic ice coverage reached a record-low 3.61 million sq.km last year, by official estimate — some 49 percent below average ice cover documented over the past thirty years. Forty-six ships transporting a total of 1.3 million tonnes of cargo used Russia's Northern Sea Route last year, compared to 34 vessels the year before.

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IMO approves compromise proposal for weighing containers
Journal of Commerce
The International Maritime Organization backed a compromise proposal for verifying the weight of containers before they are loaded on board ships. An IMO subcommittee approved draft guidelines allowing shippers two methods to verify the weight of a container as part of the London-based organization's program to improve safety at sea. Shippers can either weigh a packed container, or weigh all packages and cargo items and then add the tare mass of an empty container.
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A seaway slowdown
By Alex Binkley
Originally published for Blacklock's Reporter.
In a further sign of a slowing economy, traffic through one of the world's busiest shipping routes has tumbled nearly a tenth so far this year.

The Canadian Seaway Management Corp., which operates the federally-owned St. Lawrence Seaway system, said cargo shipments since March have totaled 19.3 million tonnes, a reduction of 9.3 percent from the same period last year. The figure represents the midway point of the shipping season.

Shipments of iron ore declined almost 15 percent; dry bulk is down almost 12 percent; and grain shipments declined more than 9 percent to date.

Bruce Hodgson, corporate director of market development, said managers were hopeful that autumn shipments of the Prairie harvest and greater imports of machinery and equipment for the Alberta oilsands will save the season.

"The indications are we will have a strong push for the rest of the year," said Hodgson. "The Prairie harvest is about four weeks behind schedule because of a late spring." The corporation had projected a 40 million tonne-season season, the equivalent of half the seaway's annual capacity.

Hodgson said the decline in iron ore cargo is mainly due to waning demand from China for U.S. ore.

The seaway's season typically ends in late December.

A late surge in Western grain exports lifted traffic volumes up four percent last year to 38.9 million tonnes, compared to 37.5 million tonnes in 2011.

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Canada's Arctic nightmare just came true: The Northwest Passage is commercial
The Globe and Mail
Stephen Harper should lose sleep, as the Danish-owned Nordic Orion becomes the first cargo vessel to use the Northwest Passage as an international shipping route — at no little risk to Canada's environment and sovereignty. The crash of a Coast Guard helicopter in the Northwest Passage underlined how very dangerous Arctic waters can be. The three men on board were wearing survival suits. They escaped the aircraft before it sank but froze to death in the hour it took for the icebreaker Amundsen to reach them.
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CITA News Bulletin
Frank Humada, Director of Publishing, 289.695.5422
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