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2014 CORS Founders' Medal Recipient
CORS
The Canadian Orthopaedic Research Society (CORS) awarded the 2014 Founder's Medal to Dr. Ashlee Dobbe (University of Alberta) and her team for their research on "Three-Dimensional Geometric Analysis of the Talus." The Founders' Medal is awarded each year to the top paper or papers presented at the CORS scientific sessions. Dr. Dobbe will present a summary of this research project at the CORS Annual Meeting in Vancouver in June 2015. Congratulations!
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Lauréats 2014 de la Médaille du fondateur
SROC
Cette année, la Société de recherche orthopédique du Canada (SROC) a remis la Médaille du fondateur à la Dre Ashlee Dobbe (Université de L'Alberta) et à son équipe pour leur recherche intitulée « Three-Dimensional Geometric Analysis of the Talus ». La Médaille du fondateur est remise annuellement pour souligner la ou les meilleures contributions aux séances scientifiques de la SROC. La Dre Dobbe présentera un résumé de ce projet de recherche à la Réunion annuelle de la SROC à Vancouver, en juin 2015. Félicitations!
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Did you know that COA membership is free for residents and fellows?
COA
Program Directors — please encourage all of your residents to join the COA during their residency. All residents and orthopaedic fellows are eligible for Associate membership within the COA during their residency and subspecialty training. There are no annual membership dues associated with this category and COA Annual Meeting online registration fees are waived for Associate members as well. This is the optimal time for them to join their national association. To apply, download a copy of the membership application form by clicking here.
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Saviez-vous que les résidents et boursiers peuvent devenir membres de l'ACO gratuitement?
L'ACO
À tous les directeurs de programme : Veuillez inciter tous les résidents à se joindre à l'ACO pendant leur résidence. Tous les résidents et boursiers en orthopédie sont admissibles au statut de membre associé de l'ACO durant leur résidence et leur formation spécialisée. Aucune cotisation n'est exigée pour cette catégorie de membres, qui bénéficient aussi d'une annulation des droits d'inscription en ligne à la Réunion annuelle de l'ACO. C'est donc la période idéale pour se joindre à leur association nationale. Pour faire une demande d'adhésion, téléchargez une copie du formulaire en cliquant ici.
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 In the News / Dans les nouvelles


Report: Lower Mainland hospitals among worst in Canada
Times Colonist
Several Fraser Health Authority hospitals have some of the worst results in Canada on various measures of patient safety and quality of care, according to a report prepared for the ministry of health. The most recent Canadian Hospital Reporting Project shows that Burnaby Hospital was the worst in Canada from 2010 to 2012 in a category called "nursing-sensitive adverse events."
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Study: Hospital elevator buttons have more bacteria than washrooms
Toronto Star
You might want to use an elbow to push the elevator button the next time you are in a hospital. A new study suggests that elevator buttons in hospitals have more bacteria on them than surfaces in hospital bathrooms. Swabs taken from 120 different elevator buttons and 96 toilet surfaces in three different hospitals in Toronto found more bugs on the buttons than in the bathrooms.
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Le nombre d'infirmières est en hausse au Canada
Radio-Canada
Le nombre d'infirmières continue d'augmenter au pays, ce qui élimine les risques de pénuries à court terme, selon l'Institut canadien d'information sur la santé. En 2013, on en comptait plus de 400 000 sur le marché du travail, ce qui représente une hausse de 8 pour cent en cinq ans.
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'Black box' technology makes its way into the operating room
CTV News
The technology that's long been used to investigate plane or train accidents is now being used in a Toronto operating room to help doctors identify their errors and prevent similar slip-ups in the future. Dr. Teodor Grantcharov, a surgeon at St. Michael's Hospital, has been using a 'black box' to record his surgeries since late April. "The interesting thing is when we operate, when we're in the action, we don't appreciate when we make an error," he told CTV's Canada AM.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Ottawa creates panel to improve quality and efficiency of health care (The Globe and Mail)
Success with total hip replacements is all about the numbers (Arthritis Foundation)
Policy allowing doctors to deny treatment on moral or religious grounds under review (The Globe and Mail)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Les étiquettes de médicaments, trop difficiles à lire
Canoe
Les informations sur les étiquettes des médicaments sur ordonnance sont souvent imprimées en caractères trop petits et difficiles à lire, ce qui peut s'avérer dangereux pour les patients, selon une nouvelle étude canadienne. Des chercheurs à l'Université de Waterloo, en Ontario, et de l'Institut national canadien pour les aveugles (INCA) ont constaté que les étiquettes ne suivent pas toujours les lignes directrices en matière de lisibilité.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Policy allowing doctors to deny treatment on moral or religious grounds under review
The Globe and Mail
Doctors who refuse to provide certain treatments on religious or moral grounds must tread delicately or risk trampling human-rights laws, according to the chief commissioner of the Ontario Human Rights Commission, which is expected to weigh in soon on a review of professional guidelines for physicians practicing in Canada's largest province.

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Providence hospitals remove restrictions on visiting hours
The Vancouver Sun
Loudspeaker announcements signalling the end of visiting hours are now a thing of the past at St. Paul's Hospital and all other Providence Health Care facilities, which are now welcoming visitors 24-7. Providence's 16 acute, rehab and long-term care facilities are believed to be the first in B.C. to drop visiting-hour restrictions. Other hospitals and health regions are considering doing likewise.

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Success with total hip replacements is all about the numbers
Arthritis Foundation
For restoring function and reducing pain, total hip replacement surgery is one of the most successful, cost-effective and safest options available — yet surgery-related complications do occur. A new study published recently in the journal BMJ has found that patients whose surgeons perform more than 35 total hip replacements (THR) per year — roughly three or more per month — have fewer complications compared to patients whose surgeons don't meet that threshold.

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COA Dispatch / Dépêche de l'ACO
Cynthia Vezina, Manager, Communications & Membership Services
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Frank Humada, Director of Publishing, 289.695.5422
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