CSHP e-Newsbrief
Oct. 16, 2013

Hospital pharmacy inspections planned in Ontario
CBC News
The Ontario government is proposing new legislation to allow hospital pharmacies to be inspected and licensed provincially following an investigation into chemotherapy overdilutions that affected 1,202 patients. In April, the Ontario College of Pharmacists said it was drafting regulations to inspect premises such as Marchese Hospital Solutions, which prepared the overdiluted chemotherapy IV bags.More

British Columbia drug safety initiative wins support in campaign to have funding restored
Vancouver Observer
It's a big deal to get a mention in the British Medical Journal (BMJ). But an axed B.C. independent drug watchdog, the Therapeutics Initiative, got an entire article written about it. The Therapeutics Initiative had its funding cut by the B.C. Liberals in April 2012, forcing UBC to step in with stop-gap funding that is at risk of not being continued.More

Canada's second-largest ER opens at Surrey Memorial Hospital in B.C.
The Globe and Mail
Premier Christy Clark officially opened Canada's second-largest hospital emergency department — a facility the size of three NHL hockey rinks. Surrey Memorial Hospital's new ER has the province's second pediatric emergency department solely for children — an idea Ms. Clark called so obvious it's long overdue during an opening ceremony. There are 100 single-patient rooms in the overall ER, up from eight previously.More

Squamish General Hospital's pharmacy re-opens
The Squamish Chief
The long-awaited $1.2 million upgrade to Squamish General Hospital's (SGH) pharmacy was officially opened this week. Patients at SGH, the Hilltop House residential care facility and outpatient chemotherapy clinics will benefit from the facility, officials said in a statement issued to coincide with the ribbon-cutting ceremony at the pharmacy. The expansion will improve the safety of pharmacy staff who prepare cancer chemotherapy, which often involves the handling of hazardous drugs.More

British Columbia drug safety initiative wins support in campaign to have funding restored
Vancouver Observer
It's a big deal to get a mention in the British Medical Journal (BMJ). But an axed B.C. independent drug watchdog, the Therapeutics Initiative, got an entire article written about it. The Therapeutics Initiative had its funding cut by the B.C. Liberals in April 2012, forcing UBC to step in with stop-gap funding that is at risk of not being continued.More

Alberta pharmacists to be paid for counselling under new deal
CBC News
Alberta pharmacists have reached an agreement in principle that would see them get paid for counselling patients. Pharmacists already assist diabetics and people who want to stop smoking, Health Minister Fred Horne said. The new deal would compensate them for those services, he said.More

New cholesterol drug without the side effects
Ottawa Citizen
A radical drug which lowers cholestorol by silencing a key gene could work just as well as statins but without the side effects and in just one dose, a study has found. More than 5 million people in Britain currently take statins to reduce their risk of heart disease. The medication has been hailed as a "wonderdrug", bringing down deaths from cardiac problems, but one in five patients with heart disease are resistant to statins. More

Apixaban: An oral anticoagulant
Pharmacy Times
Apixaban (Eliquis) was recently approved by the FDA as an oral anticoagulant (a direct inhibitor of factor Xa) to reduce the risk of embolism in patients with atrial fibrillation.1 As a potential alternative to warfarin, apixaban joins rivaroxaban (Xarelto; also a factor Xa inhibitor) and dabigatran (Pradaxa; a factor IIa inhibitor). Apixaban is partially metabolized by cytochrome P450 enzymes and is a substrate for efflux transporters. It is also eliminated by the kidneys, and reduced renal function results in some drug accumulation; dose reductions are suggested in elderly patients with renal dysfunction.More

Pharmacists deal raises questions
St. Albert Gazette
Local pharmacists are responding with mixed feelings after the Alberta Pharmacists' Association reached a tentative four-year agreement with the province last week. The deal, if ratified, will update dispensing and compensation fees for services that pharmacists provide, such as prescription authorizations, injections and care plans. The agreement will also ensure four years of predictable funding.More

McMaster University scientists make breakthrough in superbug research
The Hamilton Spectator
McMaster University researchers are making major inroads in the battle against so-called superbugs and laying the groundwork for highly effective antibiotics of the future, a scientific journal says. An article in the current issue of Nature Biotechnology outlines a new approach to isolating naturally-occurring antibiotics in soil bacteria that could produce new drugs that are effective on antibiotic-resistant bacteria. It's well known bacteria in soils and soil fungi produce antibiotics.More

Intravaginal 'ring' could deliver number of women's health drugs
in-PharmaTechnologist.com
An intravaginal ring filled with an anti-retroviral drug being developed by Northwestern University could be used to deliver drugs for a number of indications, says the Professor behind the research. The polymer device — filled with powdered tenofovir (TDF), an anti-retroviral drug — allows a lower dose of the drug to be used than the oral form, and has demonstrated successful results in preclinical tests with primates and is soon to undergo tests in humanshuman immunodeficiency virus (SHIV).More

Report: 1 in 6 newly graduated medical specialists can't find work
Times Colonist
The findings are startling, given years of complaints about doctor shortages and long wait times for surgeries. But a new report suggests that nearly one in six recently minted medical specialists cannot find work in their field. And one in five of the new specialists reported taking a series of short term fill-in posts — locums, in the lingo of medicine — to stay working. Physicians who reported having trouble finding work included urologists, critical care specialists, gastroenterologists, ophthamologists, orthopedic surgeons and general surgeons, though doctors from other sub-specialties were also unemployed.More