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Disclaimer: CSHP e-Newsbrief is a weekly listing featuring the latest news in hospital pharmacy selected from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiView. CSHP personnel approve the final summaries: any comments regarding content or this new publication should be emailed to CSHP. The presence of advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by the CSHP. Neither MultiView nor CSHP is liable for any inaccuracies or the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing, with the exception of CSHP news items.



In this issue:

Hospital enhances patient services the high-tech way
Is Dexmedetomidine more cost-effective than Propofol?
How will Toronto health care cope with population growth?
Spike in stomach illnesses puts strain on Windsor hospitals
Registry tracks silent killer
Study blames drug shortage for higher relapse rate young cancer patients with lymphoma
Massachusetts plans stricter control of compounding pharmacies
9 top-selling drugs for ultra-rare diseases
Court to decide fate of cheap, generic drugs used by


Hospital enhances patient services the high-tech way
Northumberland Today    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Northumberland Hills Hospital has always been willing to invest in technology that enhances patient care. The year 2012 brought two programs that make a real difference in patient safety and quality of care. This system gives each patient who is admitted a wristband with a unique encrypted bar code to ensure he or she gets the right medication at the right time. Codes are accessed by hospital personnel with hand-held scanners and computer-equipped mobile drug carts. More



Is Dexmedetomidine more cost-effective than Propofol?
Pharmacy Practice News    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Dexmedetomidine is a more cost-effective option than propofol for sedating mechanically ventilated patients after cardiovascular surgery, according to a single-institution, retrospective study. Although dexmedetomidine (Precedex, Hospira) is increasingly popular with physicians, some administrators have pushed back against its use because of the higher up-front costs. More

How will Toronto health care cope with population growth?
Toronto Star    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
If you think wait times at Toronto hospitals are already too long, just wait until 2036. Twenty-five years from now, Toronto is expected to have one million new residents. It's projected the GTA will reach 9.2 million by 2036, a 44 per cent increase from 2011. Density is rapidly increasing to well above the old city average of 4,077 people per square kilometre, a trend expected to continue to intensify in coming decades. More

Helping patients is our inspiration
Whether it’s pain management or ADHD, Purdue Pharma is committed to improving patients’ health and well-being. We do it by developing innovative medicines and supporting quality education for the responsible use of our products. And we do it by recognizing the hopes and needs of Canadians everywhere. more


Spike in stomach illnesses puts strain on Windsor hospitals
Metro News    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
A wave of gastrointestinal illness sweeping through Windsor is taxing resources at the region's already over-burdened hospitals, officials have said. According to Windsor Regional Hospital CEO David Musyj, there's been an unexpected spike in patients dealing with symptoms like nausea, diarrhea and dehydration. Musyj said doctors are working around the clock to care for the additional patients. More

Registry tracks silent killer
The Vancouver Sun    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Families with a genetic predisposition to high cholesterol are being asked to take part in a registry that will be the first of its kind in North America. The project will follow a model developed in the Netherlands to find and treat people who may not know they are at higher risk for heart disease, says Dr. Jiri Frohlich, a specialist in medical biochemistry and the academic director of the Healthy Heart Program at St. Paul's Hospital in Vancouver. More



Study blames drug shortage for higher relapse in young cancer patients with lymphoma
The Washington Post    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Young cancer patients who couldn't get a key medicine because of a national drug shortage were more likely to suffer a relapse than others who were able to get the preferred treatment, doctors report. It's the first evidence that a long-standing drug-supply problem probably has affected cancer treatment results in specific patients. More

Massachusetts plans stricter control of compounding pharmacies
The New York Times    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
New laws to strengthen state control of compounding pharmacies were proposed on by Gov. Deval Patrick, in hopes of preventing another public health disaster like the current outbreak of meningitis caused by a contaminated drug made in Massachusetts. The laws will be among the strongest in the country. More

9 top-selling drugs for ultra-rare diseases
The Globe and Mail    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Rare diseases are a growing focus for drug companies, with prices for some treatments for ultra-rare conditions running into hundreds of thousands of dollars a year. Here is a list of the top nine prescription drugs used to treat rare disease in patient. More

Court to decide fate of cheap, generic drugs used by poor
CTV News    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
From Africa's crowded AIDS clinics to the malarial jungles of Southeast Asia, the lives of millions of ill people in the developing world are hanging in the balance ahead of a legal ruling that will determine whether India's drug companies can continue to provide cheap versions of many life-saving medicines. The case — involving Swiss drug maker Novartis AG's cancer drug Glivec — pits aid groups that argue India plays a vital role as the pharmacy to the poor against drug companies that insist they need strong patents to make drug development profitable. A ruling by India's Supreme Court is expected in early 2013. More


 


CSHP e-Newsbrief

Frank Humada, Director of Publishing, MultiView 289.695.5422
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Siobhan Cole, Senior Content Editor, MultiView 289.695.5423   
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