This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




  Text version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit February 18, 2015

Home  About Us  Advocacy   CSHP 2015   Events   Membership   Products & Publications   Programs Resources   Contact Us

 




Disclaimer: CSHP e-Newsbrief is a weekly listing featuring the latest news of interest to hospital pharmacists, selected from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiView. CSHP personnel approve the final summaries; any comments regarding content of this publication should be emailed to CSHP. It should not be understood or implied from the presence of advertisements that CSHP endorses any products or services advertised. MultiView and CSHP are not liable for any delays or inaccuracies in the information contained in this brief, nor for any actions taken or outcomes resulting from relying on the information provided herein.



In this issue:

Drug makers to be required to post info on shortages
Science shows HPV vaccine has no dark side
Measles outbreak: Separating fact from fiction
Allergy pills still on store shelves, despite reports of misconduct by India drug facility
H5N1 bird flu virus reported in British Columbia
Rona Ambrose: Anti-vaccine movement puts children at risk
Opioid withdrawal in Ontario newborns way up over 20 years
Patients get preliminary negative for Ebola in London, ON, hospital
What's in a measles vaccine? 4 things you need to know
Old cholesterol warnings steeped in 'soft science,' may be lifted in U.S.




Drug makers to be required to post info on shortages
CBC News
The Canadian government has announced it will make it mandatory for pharmaceutical companies to post public notices when drugs are not available. Currently, posting notices to a website about drug shortages is voluntary. For months, doctors and patients have complained the approach is not working, and people are not able to get the medication they need. For instance, the former head of the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) discovered liquid penicillin was temporarily unavailable in one Edmonton hospital last fall.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  


Science shows HPV vaccine has no dark side
Toronto Star
The HPV vaccine was created to prevent an infection that causes cancer. That is pretty exciting. After all, Terry Fox's arduous marathon a day was to raise money for a cancer cure. Did he even imagine that we would have a vaccine to prevent cancer? Given the power of HPV vaccine to prevent disease and death, a long Toronto Star article that appears to suggest that the HPV vaccine causes harm is troubling and disappointing.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Program for pharmacist and pharmacy technicians

A unique online training program, developed by a team of experts and compliant with USP <797>, has just been launched by BCE Pharma. The program helps participants improve their knowledge and skills by watching videos related to compounding sterile preparations, filmed in a controlled environment. The participants also take part in online activities and quizzes to test their knowledge and answers are given in real time.

For more information call 1-514-544-5051 or visit www.bcepharma.com.
 


Measles outbreak: Separating fact from fiction
CTV News
If you were vaccinated as a kid are you 100 per cent protected? he answer to that question is when you were vaccinated We know that children born between 1970 and the early 90s likely only got one shot of the MMR and might not have long lasting immunity. You require 2 shots for sustained immunity for every 1000 people who get 2 shots 997 will be immune If you only had one as many as 50 in 1,000 are not immune.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Allergy pills still on store shelves, despite reports of misconduct by India drug facility
The Record
Canada's biggest pharmacies are selling allergy pills made with ingredients from a drug facility in India that hid unfavourable test results showing excessive levels of impurities in their products, a Toronto Star investigation has found. Recently, the Star purchased packs of over-the-counter desloratadine tablets from Toronto-based Shoppers Drug Mart, Rexall, Walmart and Costco stores.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  MEDISCA's DYE-FREE Oral Vehicles
Supported by Unique and Validated Stability indicating studies

•Target 90 day Beyond-Use-Dates at different temperatures.
•Include variable container closures such as oral syringes.
•Involve commonly compounded actives and APIs lacking stability data.
•Performed in collaboration with renowned institutions and researchers.
•Published in peer reviewed pharmaceutical journals such as the CJHP.

For more information, please call us at 1.800.655.6334, visit www.medisca.com or stop by at booth #304 at CSHP.
 


H5N1 bird flu virus reported in British Columbia
BNN
Canada reported an outbreak of the highly pathogenic bird flu virus H5N1 in British Columbia, the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) said on Monday. The outbreak was detected on Feb. 2 in a backyard poultry flock in the province of British Columbia, where bird flu cases of the separate H5N2 strain had been reported in December, it said, citing the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA).
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Rona Ambrose: Anti-vaccine movement puts children at risk
CBC News
Parents who don't vaccinate their children are putting their health and the health of other children at risk, Canada's health minister warned. The vaccination issue has returned to the forefront in recent weeks, with a spike in measles cases in Toronto and some parts of the United States. During a news conference in Vancouver, Rona Ambrose was asked for her thoughts on the movement that blames vaccines for a number of health issues.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Drug makers to be required to post info on shortages
CBC News
The Canadian government has announced it will make it mandatory for pharmaceutical companies to post public notices when drugs are not available. Currently, posting notices to a website about drug shortages is voluntary. For months, doctors and patients have complained the approach is not working, and people are not able to get the medication they need. For instance, the former head of the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) discovered liquid penicillin was temporarily unavailable in one Edmonton hospital last fall.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Canada: World's most expensive drug — costing up to $700,000 per year — too expensive
National Post
Canada’s drug-price regulator has taken the rare step of calling a hearing into what is considered the world’s most expensive prescription medicine, accusing its manufacturer of exceeding the permissible price cap. The yearly cost per patient of as much as $700,000 is even more than the manufacturer, Alexion Pharmaceutical, charges in the United States, which typically has the steepest prices globally, says the Patented Medicines Price Review Board (PMPRB).

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
University of Alberta researchers find cause of allergic reactions to medications
Edmonton Journal
Local researchers have determined what triggers allergic reactions to medications. Patients often experience itchiness, swelling, or rashes after receiving drugs or injections, painful reactions known as pseudo-allergies. Researchers at the University of Alberta, in collaboration with researchers at Johns Hopkins University, have traced those reactions to a single protein. They are now exploring ways to block the protein and lessen the side-effects of medications. The findings were published in the December edition of the journal Nature.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


Opioid withdrawal in Ontario newborns way up over 20 years
CBC News
The number of newborns suffering from opioid withdrawal in Ontario has increased 15-fold over the last 20 years, researchers have found. Researchers at Toronto's Saint Michael's Hospital and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Studies, who carried out a recently published study, found most of that increase happened in the last five years. The increase reflects an increase in prescriptions for potent and addictive pain killers, researchers said.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Patients get preliminary negative for Ebola in London, ON, hospital
CBC News
A mother and child being treated for Ebola-like symptoms at the Victoria Hospital in London, ON, have received negative results for the virus in preliminary blood tests, according to a spokesperson for the Middlesex-London Health Unit. Preliminary blood samples from both patients, who were transferred to London from Waterloo Region, came back negative. But hospital officials are still waiting on further test results, which they expect in the next few days.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


What's in a measles vaccine? 4 things you need to know
Global News
As measles outbreaks make their way through North America, vaccination is on every parent's lips. It's a contentious issue — while health officials are urging parents to vaccinate their kids against measles, mumps and rubella, a growing community of anti-vaxxers are skeptical about the MMR vaccine. Google "anti-vaccination' and you'll enter the Wild West of medical debate. Some theories suggest there is a link between autism and vaccinating children.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Old cholesterol warnings steeped in 'soft science,' may be lifted in U.S.
CBC News
For decades, health organizations and governments have encouraged people to limit how much fatty foods they eat. Now, it looks like the U.S. government is slowly retreating from its low-fat diet crusade to realign its views with modern science. Every five years, the U.S. government issues updated dietary guidelines and will release new ones this year. In a preliminary report in December, an advisory panel said dietary cholesterol is no longer "considered a nutrient of concern for over-consumption," and that finding is expected to be part of its new guidelines, which are expected shortly.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Too many pills: Tools to help elderly manage medications (Calgary Herald)
More young Canadians than ever hit with Type 2 diabetes (The Vancouver Sun)
Antibiotic discovery heralds new world of drugs (CMAJ)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 


CSHP e-Newsbrief

Frank Humada, Director of Publishing, MultiView 289.695.5422
Download media kit

Joanne Lam, Senior Content Editor, MultiView 289.695.5474   
Contribute news


To unsubscribe, click here.

Recent issues

Feb. 11, 2015
Feb. 4, 2015
jan 29, 2015 Blast
Jan. 28, 2015






50 Minthorn Blvd., Suite 800, Thornhill, ON, L3T 7X8