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Disclaimer: CSHP e-Newsbrief is a weekly listing featuring the latest news of interest to hospital pharmacists, selected from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiView. CSHP personnel approve the final summaries; any comments regarding content of this publication should be emailed to CSHP. It should not be understood or implied from the presence of advertisements that CSHP endorses any products or services advertised. MultiView and CSHP are not liable for any delays or inaccuracies in the information contained in this brief, nor for any actions taken or outcomes resulting from relying on the information provided herein.



In this issue:

Pharmacists advocate for increased services
New bill would give N.B. pharmacists more power to prescribe drugs
Why heart attack care may be less timely for women
Diagnostic tool performs blood tests via smartphone screens
WHO: Drug-resistant tuberculosis a 'global health security risk'
Drug-funding sob stories make for good reading, but we need hard evidence to set public policy
Glucosamine supplements don't reduce damage, pain in knees
Changes coming to pharmacies next month in Alberta
Combination of oral, injectable polio vaccine used for first time
Researchers create coating material to prevent blood clots associated with implanted devices
Biogen Idec wins Canadian approval for hemophilia drug Alprolix
How big data is transforming drug development
Pay-for-plasma clinic controversy doesn't scare off donors
Canadian approval sought for controversial pain drug
Electronic medical records: preparing for the inevitable crash


Pharmacists advocate for increased services
The Prince George Citizen
B.C. pharmacists are looking to expand their scope of service to include some blood tests as well as the treatment of minor ailments like insect bites or rashes. B.C. Pharmacy Association director of pharmacy practice support Derek Desrosiers said with some upgraded training, pharmacists would be able to bring increased accessibility to the healthcare system and save the government money at the same time.
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New bill would give N.B. pharmacists more power to prescribe drugs
CTV News
Pharmacists in New Brunswick could soon be given more power to prescribe drugs. A bill tabled in the legislature would allow pharmacists to offer drug treatments for up to 30 minor ailments. Progressive Conservative back-bencher Ryan Riordon introduced the bill to change the Pharmacy Act recently. "Pharmacists will have the authority to write those prescriptions for those treatments for those conditions," says Sam Lanctin of the New Brunswick Pharmaceutical Society.
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Why heart attack care may be less timely for women
CBC News
You can use your feminine wiles for many things, but apparently not to get better care at the hospital. A new study, published recently in the Canadian Medical Association Journal, found that women do not get care as fast as men during heart attacks, especially if they are anxious or identify with "feminine" gender roles. This delay in care also extended to men who self-identified with feminine gender traits.
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Diagnostic tool performs blood tests via smartphone screens
CTV News
Need a blood test? Soon you might be able to use your smartphone! A micro-engineering laboratory at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology has developed a diagnostic tool that performs blood tests via smartphone screens. The tool allows people undergoing anticoagulant treatments to easily test their blood at home, with the entire process taking mere minutes.
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WHO: Drug-resistant tuberculosis a 'global health security risk'
CBC News
Half a million people fell sick with dangerous superbug strains of tuberculosis (TB) in 2012, but fewer than one in four were diagnosed, putting the rest at risk of dying due to the wrong medicines or no treatment at all. Latest data from the World Health Organization (WHO), which says drug-resistant TB is a "global health security risk," showed a third of the estimated 9 million people who contract TB in any form each year do not get the care they need.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
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If your hospital is using automated dispensing cabinets or Bar Code Medication Administration at the bedside you should consider Pentapack unit dose packaging for your orals, liquids, suppositories and ampoules. Pentapack is a complete and inexpensive system which offers a variety of packaging and labelling formats. For more information contact Manrex at 1.800.665.7652 or visit www.manrex.com.
 


Drug-funding sob stories make for good reading, but we need hard evidence to set public policy
The Globe and Mail
"Cystic fibrosis girl denied life-saving drug." "Girl, 12, asks Ontario to cover life-saving cystic fibrosis drug." Those two headlines ran from opposite ends of the world: The former was the story of Sinead Brown of Dunedin, New Zealand; the latter about Madi Vanstone of Beeton, ON.
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Glucosamine supplements don't reduce damage, pain in knees
U.S. Pharmacist
Taking an oral glucosamine supplement doesn't diminish knee cartilage deterioration in patients suffering chronic knee pain, according to a new study. The short-term study, published recently in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatology, indicates that glucosamine does not decrease pain or improve knee bone marrow lesions, which are believed to be a source of pain in osteoarthritis.
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Changes coming to pharmacies next month in Alberta
Cold Lake Sun
The effects of upcoming changes for pharmacists may not be seen for a while, but they should help both consumers and pharmacists, say local practitioners. The changes, to take effect in April will mandate one dispensing fee for all medications, regardless of how much a medication costs, instead of the current system which has three different fees, depending on the costs of the medication.
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Combination of oral, injectable polio vaccine used for first time
Global News
A new report says the first ever trial where oral and injectable polio vaccine were given at the same time to try to quell an outbreak has produced encouraging results. The vaccination campaign, in and around Somali refugee camps in Kenya, resulted in high vaccination coverage, despite concerns that it would be hard to reach a lot of the children who needed the vaccine.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
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Researchers create coating material to prevent blood clots associated with implanted devices
Health Canal
Blood clots at or near implanted devices are thought to occur when the flow of nitric oxide, a naturally occurring clot-preventing agent generated in the blood vessels, is cut off. When this occurs, the devices can fail. Some researchers have sought to solve this problem with implantable devices that gradually release nitric oxide, but their supply of the agent is necessarily limited. Instead, the UCLA–Michigan team focused on an ultra-thin coating for the devices that acts as a chemical catalyst.
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Pharmacists advocate for increased services
The Prince George Citizen
B.C. pharmacists are looking to expand their scope of service to include some blood tests as well as the treatment of minor ailments like insect bites or rashes. B.C. Pharmacy Association director of pharmacy practice support Derek Desrosiers said with some upgraded training, pharmacists would be able to bring increased accessibility to the healthcare system and save the government money at the same time.

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Concerns over vaccination rates growing nationwide
News 1130
As public health workers try to contain a measles outbreak in the eastern Fraser Valley, there are worries it could spread to the wider population. The immunization rate has been declining for a decade across Canada resulting in comeback of some infectious diseases that were stamped out years ago, including measles, whooping cough and even tuberculosis in some communities.

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Can antibiotics trigger arrhythmias?
MedPage Today
Azithromycin and levofloxacin were both associated with elevated risks of death and serious cardiac arrhythmias during standard lengths of prescription, a study of mostly male military veterans showed. Through the first five days after a prescription was dispensed, the risk of all-cause death was 48 per cent greater.

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Biogen Idec wins Canadian approval for hemophilia drug Alprolix
Reuters
Biogen Idec said recently it had won Canadian approval for its long-lasting hemophilia B drug Alprolix. Hemophilia B, a rare inherited disorder in which the ability of a person's blood to clot is impaired, affects some 4,000 people in the United States and roughly 25,000 worldwide. Biogen is developing the drug in partnership with Swedish Orphan Biovitrum AB. It is expected to be approved in the United States later this year.
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How big data is transforming drug development
Forbes
When the FDA approved Genentech's Herceptin in 2010, it became the first genetically targeted therapy for breast cancer. Today that tight targeting is becoming possible for other drugs and diseases, as pharmaceutical companies turn to big data to help with drug development. Big data is beginning to deliver on the promise of personalized medicine that matches drugs to individual patients rather than the aggregated results that have characterized medicine for centuries.
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Pay-for-plasma clinic controversy doesn't scare off donors
Toronto Star
On the same day that Health Minister Deb Matthews announced "grounds for inspection" of a pay-for-plasma clinic, donors appeared unfazed by the brewing controversy as they continued to roll up their sleeves. Matthews said ministry observers who had visited the Adelaide St. premises for its opening determined the fledgling operations of Canadian Plasma Resources warrant a closer look under the Laboratory and Specimen Collection Centre Licensing Act.
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Canadian approval sought for controversial pain drug
CMAJ
As Americans campaign to revoke approval of Zohydro, a new opioid pain medication, the Canadian licence-holder says it is planning to submit the drug to Health Canada for approval. Zohydro (hydrocodone bitartrate) is a high-dose, extended-release opioid for the treatment of chronic pain that requires around-the-clock management and has failed respond to other medications.
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Electronic medical records: preparing for the inevitable crash
CMAJ
It happened to a hospital in Boulder, CO, last March. It happened to seven hospitals in the East Bay area of California last August. In the early months of 2013, it happened to hundreds of family doctors in Nova Scotia. It has happened to health care providers in England, Australia and other parts of the world.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Canadian researchers probing if blood-pressure drugs can slow Alzheimer's (CTV News)
Bupivacaine formula cuts narcotic use (MedPage Today)
Oral cancer drugs: group pushes for universal coverage (CBC News)

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CSHP e-Newsbrief

Frank Humada, Director of Publishing, MultiView 289.695.5422
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Siobhan Cole, Senior Content Editor, MultiView 289.695.5423   
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