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Disclaimer: CSHP e-Newsbrief is a weekly listing featuring the latest news of interest to hospital pharmacists, selected from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiView. CSHP personnel approve the final summaries; any comments regarding content of this publication should be emailed to CSHP. It should not be understood or implied from the presence of advertisements that CSHP endorses any products or services advertised. MultiView and CSHP are not liable for any delays or inaccuracies in the information contained in this brief, nor for any actions taken or outcomes resulting from relying on the information provided herein.



In this issue:

Regulatory gap leaves Canadians at risk as online pharmacies multiply
Pharmacist pre- and post-discharge medication review equally important
Families suing drug maker of blood thinner over bleeding risks
Doctor: Paid medical lecturers pushing new drugs
8 new drugs added to P.E.I. formulary
Brampton woman must pay for cancer drugs usually covered by OHIP
Patents drive blockbuster deals in drug industry
B.C. family with epileptic child wants law allowing her to use medical marijuana
New migraine drugs bring relief to sufferers with pain prevention
Statins linked to lower mortality in status epilepticus
Drugs to cure hepatitis coming — if you have $55,000
Major sign of kidney and heart damage often ignored: proteinuria


Regulatory gap leaves Canadians at risk as online pharmacies multiply
iPolitics
Filling a drug prescription can be a mouse click away, but Canadians may be putting their lives at stake in the process. Regulations have been slow to keep up with the growing online pharmaceutical industry, leaving consumers at risk in a digital world where few rules exist. The rise and popularity of Internet pharmacies has changed the way many Canadians go about purchasing prescription drugs.
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Pharmacist pre- and post-discharge medication review equally important
Drug Topics
Pharmacists who contacted high-risk patients within 72 hours of discharge from Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, found more than half of the patients had medication-related issues. In a different group of high-risk patients who had received inpatient interventions, 35 per cent of patients were found to have issues after a pharmacist reviewed their medications just prior to discharge, according to Laura Carr, PharmD.
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Families suing drug maker of blood thinner over bleeding risks
CTV News
Susan Garau, 61, was down with the flu last year when she was found incoherent and bleeding from her mouth while in bed. By the time Garau arrived at Seven Oaks General Hospital in Winnipeg, the grandmother was hemorrhaging from several parts of her body including her mouth, intestines and brain. "They were draining blood from the stomach, she was bleeding from her mouth ... and by that evening she slipped into a coma and was bleeding everywhere," recalls Garau's daughter, Brigitte Pichon.
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Doctor: Paid medical lecturers pushing new drugs
The Waterloo Region Record
A Cambridge family doctor is on a mission to stop medical specialists from getting paid by drug companies when they lecture other doctors about new drugs. Dr. Paul Cary says doctors in Ontario must receive professional development. Often, the additional training comes in the form of medical specialists who offer lectures which are sponsored by pharmaceutical companies pushing a new drug.
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8 new drugs added to P.E.I. formulary
The Journal Pioneer
Eight drugs have been added to the provincial formulary, making it easier for Islanders to access the medications they need, says Health Minister Doug Currie. Since 2006-2007, spending on pharmacare programs in Prince Edward Island has increased by more than 40 per cent and government has added or expanded coverage of 203 medications to the list of drugs available through provincial drug programs.
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If your hospital is using automated dispensing cabinets or Bar Code Medication Administration at the bedside you should consider Pentapack unit dose packaging for your orals, liquids, suppositories and ampoules. Pentapack is a complete and inexpensive system which offers a variety of packaging and labelling formats. For more information contact Manrex at 1.800.665.7652 or visit www.manrex.com.
 


Brampton woman must pay for cancer drugs usually covered by OHIP
Toronto Star
Anne Mitchell says she’s ready to sell her house if she must to find the $52,000 necessary to pay for her chemotherapy drugs — medication sometimes covered by OHIP, but not in her case. Mitchell, a 67-year-old grandmother of four, is going through her second bout of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). She found out that one of the chemo drugs she needs, bendamustine, is only covered by OHIP for first-line treatment, and this is Mitchell's second experience with chemo.
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Patents drive blockbuster deals in drug industry
Toronto
A series of blockbuster deals in the pharmaceutical industry drove share prices higher as companies look for new sources of revenue as more major drugs are set to lose their patent protection. Canada's Valeant Pharmaceuticals International led the way with a nearly $45 billion joint offer with U.S. activist investor Bill Ackman for Botox maker Allergan Inc.
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B.C. family with epileptic child wants law allowing her to use medical marijuana
Edmonton Journal via Penticton Herald
When a retired police officer from Summerland, left his job after 25 years, he hardly imagined fighting for his little granddaughter to be given marijuana. Chris Nuessler, along his wife and Elaine, wants Canada to allow two-year-old Kyla Williams to be given a form of medical marijuana known to prevent seizures resulting from epilepsy.
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As a manufacturer of generic drugs our flexibility and turnaround times exceed the industry standards.
 


New migraine drugs bring relief to sufferers with pain prevention
Medical Daily
For those who suffer from migraines, you know that they can often be debilitating. A day with a migraine is one spent hoarded up in a room, shades drawn, eyes shut tight, wishing for sleep to provide relief from the pain. Two new drug studies are changing the way that a medicine looks at treating migraines.
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Families suing drug maker of blood thinner over bleeding risks
CTV News
Susan Garau, 61, was down with the flu last year when she was found incoherent and bleeding from her mouth while in bed. By the time Garau arrived at Seven Oaks General Hospital in Winnipeg, the grandmother was hemorrhaging from several parts of her body including her mouth, intestines and brain. "They were draining blood from the stomach, she was bleeding from her mouth ... and by that evening she slipped into a coma and was bleeding everywhere," recalls Garau's daughter, Brigitte Pichon.

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Arthritis drug stops selling in Canada; leaves young patients desperate
The Globe and Mail
Arthritis is Abigail Stewart's constant companion. The pain makes the simplest tasks, such as buttoning her clothes or writing her name, a challenge. Walking any great distance is out of the question. Abigail Stewart can barely move in the morning and spends up to two hours doing exercises and stretches in bed before she feels well enough to get up. In between all of that, she has to find time for school, homework and gymnastics classes.

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Questions raised about morning sickness drug Diclectin
Hamilton Spectator
Several Toronto-based researchers are again raising questions about a medication commonly prescribed to pregnant women for morning sickness. In a commentary published in the Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology Canada, they point to key flaws in a study on the drug Diclectin. The drug is a combination of an antihistamine and vitamin B6.

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Statins linked to lower mortality in status epilepticus
Medscape
Further evidence that statin drugs may have a positive effect on epilepsy has come from a Swiss study. The study was led by Andrea O. Rossetti, MD, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne, Switzerland. "We found statin use was associated with a significant reduction in death after status epilepticus," Dr. Rossetti commented to Medscape Medical News.
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Drugs to cure hepatitis coming — if you have $55,000
Leader-Post
Breakthrough drugs able to cure even advanced cases of hepatitis C will soon be approved in Canada. But unless provincial governments agree to fund the costly drugs, those who need them to survive likely won't be able to obtain them. Health Canada approved two new drugs, sofosbuvir and simeprevir, late last year.
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Major sign of kidney and heart damage often ignored: proteinuria
Medical News Today
Many patients with too much protein in their urine - the earliest sign of kidney damage and a risk factor for heart disease - go untreated, according to new findings presented at the National Kidney Foundation's 2014 Spring Clinical Meetings. The study, in hospitalized patients, also found that 41 percent of patients with this condition, called proteinuria, reported taking a common type of over-the-counter pain medication called non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which can worsen kidney function.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Study: Stroke survivors benefit from regular meetings with pharmacist (The Globe and Mail)
Effective pharmacy-led discharge plans share some common traits (Pharmacy Practice News)
Antipsychotic drugs prescribed to seniors at alarming rates, province finds (Toronto Star)
Video: MS: What role does vitamin D play? (MedPage Today)

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CSHP e-Newsbrief

Frank Humada, Director of Publishing, MultiView 289.695.5422
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Siobhan Cole, Senior Content Editor, MultiView 289.695.5423   
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