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Disclaimer: CSHP e-Newsbrief is a weekly listing featuring the latest news of interest to hospital pharmacists, selected from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiView. CSHP personnel approve the final summaries; any comments regarding content of this publication should be emailed to CSHP. It should not be understood or inferred from the presence of advertisements that CSHP endorses any products or services advertised. Similarly, CSHP is not responsible for the quality of journalism reflected in the articles: it should not be understood or inferred that CSHP supports the information provided. MultiView and CSHP are not liable, any delays or inaccuracies in the information contained in this brief, nor for any actions taken or outcomes resulting from relying on the information provided herein.



In this issue:

Responsibility falls to doctors to prescribe and dispense controversial abortion drug
Fake oxycontin warning sounded in Kindersley, Sask. after 2 deaths
Nosode homeopathic labels must read 'not vaccines or alternatives to vaccines'
New oxycodone rules would give drug maker a monopoly in Canada
A drug to treat Huntington's is closer than ever — but those who need it remain cautious
The cannabis doctor is in
Pharmacist saves life of woman stung by wasp





Responsibility falls to doctors to prescribe and dispense controversial abortion drug
Toronto Star
Controversial abortion drug RU-486 might be coming to Canada, but whether you get your hands on it will be left up to a doctor. Under Health Canada provisions for the "safe and effective use" of the drug, approved in the country recently, physicians will be left to both prescribe and dispense the product, under the name mifegymiso.
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Fake oxycontin warning sounded in Kindersley, Sask. after 2 deaths
Global News
Recent drug overdoses in western Saskatchewan have police sounding an alarm over fake OxyContin. Kindersley RCMP say officers have dealt with three overdoses of young adults in the past month resulting in two deaths. Fentanyl pills — counterfeit OxyContin — have recently been linked to several deaths in Western Canada including one last month in the Pleasantdale district of Saskatchewan.
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Nosode homeopathic labels must read 'not vaccines or alternatives to vaccines'
CBC News
Homeopathic products promoted to parents will need to be clear they are not vaccines or alternatives to vaccines, Health Canada says. The department announced recently it is introducing label changes for certain homeopathic products. Nosodes are ultradiluted forms of diseased tissue, pus, blood, or excretions from a sick person or animal that some homeopaths and naturopaths sell, often in a pellet form.
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New oxycodone rules would give drug maker a monopoly in Canada
The Globe and Mail
The federal government's proposed rules aimed at making oxycodone more difficult to abuse would force generic versions of the popular drug off the market, handing the company at the centre of Canada's prescription painkiller crisis a monopoly. Health Canada unveiled draft rules in June that would require slow-release oxycodone to be tamper-resistant, making it more difficult to crush, snort or inject for a quick high.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Program for pharmacists and pharmacy technicians

A unique online training program, developed by a team of experts and compliant with USP <797>, has just been launched by BCE Pharma. The program helps participants improve their knowledge and skills by watching videos related to compounding sterile preparations, filmed in a controlled environment. The participants also take part in online activities and quizzes to test their knowledge and answers are given in real time.

For more information call 1-514-544-5051 or visit www.bcepharma.com.
 


A drug to treat Huntington's is closer than ever — but those who need it remain cautious
The Globe and Mail
It has worked on mice and monkeys. And starting soon in Vancouver, scientists will begin a long-awaited trial to see if a new drug might also slow the progression of Huntington's disease in humans. The Centre for Huntington Disease at the University of British Columbia, led by neurologist Dr. Blair Leavitt, is already in the process of identifying six patient candidates who in August will participate in a trial for a drug known as ASO-HTT, the first drug to target the cause of HD: a mutant gene that produces a toxic protein.
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The cannabis doctor is in
CMAJ
Doctors can become subspecialists in fields such as cardiology, gynecology or neurology, but what about cannabinoidology? Just over a year after new federal regulations made physicians the gatekeepers for prescribing access to medical marijuana, a handful are focusing on cannabis as a therapeutic agent and carving out a new subspecialty.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Discover Hospira's Specialty INJECTABLE Pharmaceuticals

Hospira's vision of integrity, accountability, and speed makes us a leading provider of a comprehensive line of high quality and cost effective generic injectables in Canada.

Learn more about Hospira's speciality injectable pharmaceuticals at www.hospira.ca or contact your Hospira Representative at 1-866-488-6088.
 


Pharmacist saves life of woman stung by wasp
CBC News
A woman from the Laurentians is thanking her pharmacist for saving her life. Josée Asselin was out working in her garden in Saint-Colomban a few weeks ago when she says she felt a sting on her arm. She glanced down and saw what looked like a wasp. In less than a minute, Asselin says she started itching all over. She jumped into the car to pick up an antihistamine at the pharmacy.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    WHO: Insecticide used to treat head lice can cause cancer (CTV News)
Some pharmacists refusing to sell morning-after pills to overweight women (National Post)
Harper government moves to implement mandatory drug shortage reporting (Government of Canada)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 


CSHP e-Newsbrief

Frank Humada, Director of Publishing, MultiView 289.695.5422
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Joanne Lam, Senior Content Editor, MultiView 289.695.5474   
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