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Disclaimer: CSHP e-Newsbrief is a weekly listing featuring the latest news of interest to hospital pharmacists, selected from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiView. CSHP personnel approve the final summaries; any comments regarding content of this publication should be emailed to CSHP. It should not be understood or implied from the presence of advertisements that CSHP endorses any products or services advertised. MultiView and CSHP are not liable for any delays or inaccuracies in the information contained in this brief, nor for any actions taken or outcomes resulting from relying on the information provided herein.



In this issue:

Virus study: Ebola outbreaks have different sources in nature
Universal cancer coverage problem will only 'get worse'
Kids who drink milk substitutes may be missing out on vitamin D
Ontario health minister pledges review of generic drug-cost study
Canada gives Spain, Norway experimental drug to treat Ebola cases
Experts: Off-label prescribing of antipsychotic drug highlights lack of oversight
Ebola outbreak: Preparedness guidelines updated, test drill in Halifax successful, officials say
Canada urged to cancel Ebola vaccine licence, transfer rights to bigger company
Researchers: Outdated science puts health care workers at risk
Calls for a better food guide
Stenting prevented stroke effectively
Combination therapy for COPD yields better outcomes
Poorly managed anticoagulation may contribute to risk of dementia
Dear pharmacist, what do you do all day?
New drug-delivery capsule may replace injections




Virus study: Ebola outbreaks have different sources in nature
CTV News
A second, smaller Ebola outbreak has been going on in Africa, and a new study shows it has a different source in nature than the massive epidemic raging now in the western part of the continent. The outbreak that began in July in the Democratic Republic of Congo is similar to earlier ones in that central African region, genetic testing of viruses shows. At least 69 people, including eight health workers, are believed to have been infected, and 49 have died.
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Universal cancer coverage problem will only 'get worse'
CBC News
A cancer care specialist at Capital Health is speaking out about the enormous cost some cancer patients are required to pay, out of pocket, for their potentially life-saving medication. Mary Lou Robertson, a medication resource specialist with the Capital Health Cancer Care program in Halifax, is also a part of CanCertainty — a coalition of 35 cancer organizations calling for fairness in drug costs.
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Kids who drink milk substitutes may be missing out on vitamin D
The Globe and Mail
If your child is allergic to milk, can’t tolerate lactose (the natural sugar in milk) or eats a vegetarian diet, non-dairy beverages are popular replacements for cow’s milk. But research from St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto suggests young kids who drink rice, almond, soy or goat’s milk are at risk for vitamin D deficiency.
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Ontario health minister pledges review of generic drug-cost study
Toronto Star
Ontario Health Minister Eric Hoskins has asked his ministry to review a new study showing Canada pays more than double for common generic drugs compared to other developed countries. Health critics have called for a review of the purchasing system for the drugs in the wake of the study, published recently. "We've known for a long time that this needs to be changed, but the political will for change has never been there," said NDP health critic France Gélinas.
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Canada gives Spain, Norway experimental drug to treat Ebola cases
CP24
The Public Health Agency of Canada gave health officials in Spain and Norway a ZMapp-like drug to treat two health-care workers infected with Ebola, the agency confirmed recently. The National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg sent Spain and Norway one treatment course each of ZMab, a monoclonal antibody cocktail developed at the lab. The supplies of the drug were what is called laboratory grade and had been made for research in animals.
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Experts: Off-label prescribing of antipsychotic drug highlights lack of oversight
CTV News
An increase in the number of prescriptions of a powerful antipsychotic drug for conditions not approved by Health Canada is raising concern about what medical experts call lack of professional and government oversight of doctors' prescribing practices. Also known as off-label prescribing, the practice is believed to be the reason why the number of prescriptions for Seroquel — a drug only approved in Canada for the treatment of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia — has nearly doubled in the last six years.
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Ebola outbreak: Preparedness guidelines updated, test drill in Halifax successful, officials say
CBC News
Canada's new Ebola guidelines will be discussed by nursing leaders. The Canadian Federation of Nurses Unions is holding the news conference in Ottawa on the Public Health Agency of Canada's draft Ebola guidelines. Earlier, Dr. Gregory Taylor, chief public health officer, said the guidelines are continually reviewed and updated, based on lessons from the outbreak in West Africa and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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Canada urged to cancel Ebola vaccine licence, transfer rights to bigger company
CTV News
A prominent law professor is urging the federal government to terminate an American company's licence for a Canadian-made Ebola vaccine. The company, NewLink Genetics, doesn't have the capacity to develop the much-needed vaccine, argues Amir Attaran, a professor of law and population health at the University of Ottawa. "The mistake Canada has made has been to keep this bad marriage with NewLink and try to make it better. Canada should either be terminating the licence agreement outright or simply issuing another licence on non-commercial terms to someone else," Attaran told The Canadian Press in an interview.
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Researchers: Outdated science puts health care workers at risk
Toronto Sun
Canada's point man on SARS warns health agencies that insist Ebola never spreads through the air are risking the lives of nurses on outdated science older than colour television. Dr. Bhagi Singh was the federal government's go-to researcher in the fight against SARS and H1N1, directing the Canadian Institute of Health Research for 10 years.
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Calls for a better food guide
CMAJ
It promotes overconsumption. It's too soft on highly refined carbohydrates. It considers sugary juices equivalent to fruit. It doesn't reflect what Canadians actually consider a serving size. It's influenced by the food industry. It doesn't differentiate between good and poor sources of proteins and fats. It's outdated, too general and not all that useful.
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TRENDING ARTICLE
Virus study: Ebola outbreaks have different sources in nature
CTV News
A second, smaller Ebola outbreak has been going on in Africa, and a new study shows it has a different source in nature than the massive epidemic raging now in the western part of the continent. The outbreak that began in July in the Democratic Republic of Congo is similar to earlier ones in that central African region, genetic testing of viruses shows. At least 69 people, including eight health workers, are believed to have been infected, and 49 have died.

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Pharmacists still the 'best placed health professionals' to check drug risks
CBC News
Pharmacists are still seen as the best equipped health-care professionals to ensure the safety of drug prescriptions, despite the failure of two of them who ignored the risks of an adverse reaction between two medications, leading to the death of a B.C. woman. "Much is expected of pharmacists across the country, and that has been expanding over these last years," said Zubin Austin, a professor at the University of Toronto's faculty of pharmacy.

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Re-inventing Alberta Health Services
Troy Media
In May of 2005, Premier Ed Stelmach dissolved Alberta's regional health authorities and created Alberta Health Services (AHS), a single centralized bureaucratic entity governing health care. The logic for this action could have been lifted directly from any large-scale corporate merger: "we're reducing bureaucracy, eliminating needless duplication. We anticipate achieving across-the-board cost savings from 'synergies.'"

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Stenting prevented stroke effectively
Daily Rx
When plaque builds up in the major arteries in the neck, the risk of stroke increases. But invasive surgery may no longer be necessary to address the blockage. A recent study compared two treatments for carotid artery disease, a condition in which plaque hinders blood from flowing toward the brain, which can cause a stroke. Endarterectomy is an invasive surgical procedure in which a surgeon removes the plaque from the artery.
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Combination therapy for COPD yields better outcomes
Pharmacy Practice News
Among older adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), particularly those with asthma, newly prescribed long-acting B-agonists (LABAs) and inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) combination therapy, compared with newly prescribed LABAs alone, was associated with a lower risk for death or COPD hospitalization, according to a recent study out of Toronto.
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Poorly managed anticoagulation may contribute to risk of dementia
Drug Topics
Excellent anticoagulation management appears to lower the risk of dementia over the long term in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). A study of 2,605 patients tracked an average of four years found an inverse relationship between the percentage of time in the therapeutic range (TTR) of INR and long-term risk of a dementia diagnosis in AF patients. Patients in the study were managed on warfarin with a target INR of two to three.
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Dear pharmacist, what do you do all day?
The Pharmaceutical Journal
It must be frustrating for pharmacists when someone comes into the pharmacy and says "I'll wait. It won't take you a minute," and lodges a prescription with multiple items on the counter. Surely that's a cue to pull out a laminated chart explaining the role of the pharmacist: the clinical checks, the phone calls to doctors querying things all quietly in the background, the public health services. There seems to be an imbalance in what pharmacists perceive what they do and what the public thinks.
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New drug-delivery capsule may replace injections
MIT
Given a choice, most patients would prefer to take a drug orally instead of getting an injection. Unfortunately, many drugs, especially those made from large proteins, cannot be given as a pill because they get broken down in the stomach before they can be absorbed. To help overcome that obstacle, researchers at MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have devised a novel drug capsule coated with tiny needles that can inject drugs directly into the lining of the stomach after the capsule is swallowed.
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CSHP e-Newsbrief

Frank Humada, Director of Publishing, MultiView 289.695.5422
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Siobhan Cole, Senior Content Editor, MultiView 289.695.5423   
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