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Disclaimer: CSHP e-Newsbrief is a weekly listing featuring the latest news of interest to hospital pharmacists, selected from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiView. CSHP personnel approve the final summaries; any comments regarding content of this publication should be emailed to CSHP. It should not be understood or implied from the presence of advertisements that CSHP endorses any products or services advertised. MultiView and CSHP are not liable for any delays or inaccuracies in the information contained in this brief, nor for any actions taken or outcomes resulting from relying on the information provided herein.



In this issue:

Reducing antibiotic use is crucial
ECDC: Last-resort antibiotics are losing power in Europe
New Saskatoon pharmacy opens to improve patient safety
B.C. health provider and patients to sue over prescription heroin access
The unification of pharmacy
Serotonin syndrome risk from triptans, antidepressants downplayed
Study: Compression bandages work as well for lymphedema as daily massage
Statin use urged for 33 million Americans
U.S. moves bill to bring stricter oversight to specialty pharmacies


Reducing antibiotic use is crucial
Leader-Post
Dr. Alex Wong, an infectious diseases specialist with the Regina Qu'Appelle Health Region, is warning the public and physicians not to overuse antibiotics so our drug arsenal is ready for the rise of superbugs. What are superbugs? Wong: Bacteria that have become resistant to the most powerful antibiotics we have. There's a lot more bacteria than there are human beings. They multiply much more quickly.
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ECDC: Last-resort antibiotics are losing power in Europe
Bloomberg
Antibiotics that are the last line of defense against life-threatening germs spread commonly in hospitals are starting to lose power in Europe, stoking concern that once easily-cured infections may become untreatable. A germ called Acinetobacter has become resistant to one of the last resorts to treat bacterial infections in more than 25 percent of cases in eight out of 18 countries reporting data, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control said in a report today.
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New Saskatoon pharmacy opens to improve patient safety
Global News
Employees moved into a new state-of-the-art pharmacy at Royal University Hospital (RUH) this week. The $4.5 million renovated facility offers more space plus equipment upgrades expected to help improve patient care and safety. In 2010, a pharmaceutical error resulted in four infants receiving incorrect medication. TPN, which is given to patients when no other form of nourishment is possible, contained insulin rather than heparin.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Complete Unit Dose Packaging

If your hospital is using automated dispensing cabinets or Bar Code Medication Administration at the bedside you should consider Pentapack unit dose packaging for your orals, liquids, suppositories and ampoules. Pentapack is a complete and inexpensive system which offers a variety of packaging and labelling formats. For more information contact Manrex at 1.800.665.7652 or visit www.manrex.com.
 


B.C. health provider and patients to sue over prescription heroin access
National Post
For decades, Larry Love's daily life was consumed by heroin. Find it. Inject it. Repeat. That cycle, he said, was broken last year when he enrolled in a radical clinical trial in Vancouver evaluating the use of prescription heroin, seen as the treatment of last resort for severely addicted people for whom other therapy, such as methadone or detox, have failed.
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The unification of pharmacy
Pharmacy Times
Have you ever thought about whether there could be a universal definition of a pharmacist? A statement that succinctly captures how they are trained and what they do? One that would encompass activities that are observed in pharmacists located in North and South America, Europe, Africa, and Asia, including the educational structure that trained them and the governmental regulation that defines their practice capabilities? If you have ever had the opportunity to observe pharmacy practice or education in different parts of the world, you will recognize that there are tremendous variations. Some schools of pharmacy emphasize research, others focus on pharmaceutical manufacturing, and some concentrate on clinical pharmacy.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Making Us A Wise Choice

As a manufacturer of generic drugs our flexibility and turnaround times exceed the industry standards.
 


Serotonin syndrome risk from triptans, antidepressants downplayed
Pharmacy Practice News
A new analysis adds to the evidence that coprescribing triptans and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) is safe. Researchers reviewed data from Partners Healthcare, a not-for-profit health care system founded by Brigham and Women's Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital. The data was collected between 2001 and 2010 and showed very few cases of possible serotonin syndrome, despite a steady climb in the number of people who were prescribed both a triptan and an SSRI or SNRI.
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New Saskatoon pharmacy opens to improve patient safety
Global News
Employees moved into a new state-of-the-art pharmacy at Royal University Hospital (RUH) this week. The $4.5 million renovated facility offers more space plus equipment upgrades expected to help improve patient care and safety. In 2010, a pharmaceutical error resulted in four infants receiving incorrect medication. TPN, which is given to patients when no other form of nourishment is possible, contained insulin rather than heparin.

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Study: Interaction between hypertension drug and antibiotic can lead to kidney injury
CTV News
A new Canadian study suggests people taking a commonly used type of high blood pressure medication should not be prescribed a particular type of antibiotic. The study suggests the combination can result in rare but serious kidney injuries. And senior author Dr. Amit Garg says a study of Ontario's health records shows the combination has been prescribed nearly 100,000 times in the past decade, despite the fact that there are warnings against combining the drugs.

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How long should antiplatelet therapy last following stent implantation?
Drug Topics
Short-term dual antiplatelet therapy was as effective as long-term therapy for patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with a second-generation drug-eluting stent, according to an online study published in JAMA. After undergoing PCI with zotarolimus-eluting stents, more than 3,000 patients received either aspirin (100 to 200 mg) and clopidogrel (75 mg) daily for three months or 12 months during the OPTIMIZE trial.

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Study: Compression bandages work as well for lymphedema as daily massage
CTV News
A new study suggests compression bandages work as well as daily massage for the treatment of a complication of breast cancer treatment called lymphedema. The condition is the result of the removal or damage of lymph nodes, which drain lymphatic fluid. Lymph nodes are sometimes removed during breast cancer treatment, to minimize the risk of further spread.
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Statin use urged for 33 million Americans
Drug Topics
Statin therapy is now recommended for approximately 33 million more Americans who don't have cardiovascular disease (CVD), but have an estimated 10-year CV risk of 7.5 per cent or higher. These individuals also have LDL cholesterol between 70 mg/dL and 189 mg/dL, according to new guidelines issued Nov. 12 by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association.
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U.S. moves bill to bring stricter oversight to specialty pharmacies
Nanaimo Daily News
The Senate voted to advance a bill designed to tighten government oversight of pharmacies that custom-mix prescription drugs, in the wake of last year's deadly meningitis outbreak tied to contaminated pain injections. The bill cleared a parliamentary hurdle on a 97-1 vote, indicating its overwhelming support in the Senate. The legislation, passed by the House in September, also creates a national system for tracking prescription drugs from manufacturers to retail pharmacies.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Flu shot: 21 facts about the flu (The Huffington Post)
MERS case reported in Spain (CTV News)
Pediatricians back Prozac-like drugs for children (The Ottawa Citizen)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 


CSHP e-Newsbrief

Frank Humada, Director of Publishing, MultiView 289.695.5422
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Siobhan Cole, Senior Content Editor, MultiView 289.695.5423   
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