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FCEP NEWS



SAVE THE DATE!


Learn to recognize the signs of this type of modern-day slavery, and have the means to respond

This FREE, one-day program is designed for the continuum of emergency medicine providers.

Approximately thirty percent of human trafficking victims will encounter an Emergency Medicine (EM) professional during their time of enslavement, unfortunately none of them are freed as a result of their encounter. Emergency medicine professionals play a key role in recognizing the signs that a patient is being victimized by human trafficking and are afforded a unique window of opportunity by which to offer help. This comprehensive educational program will focus on the pre-hospital and hospital encounters in an effort to elevate the knowledge base of EM professionals, allowing for proper identification and subsequent intervention. Providing EM professionals with the tools to understand the wide-ranging problem of trafficking, including when and how to act, can lead to the freedom of many of those currently enslaved. Learn more.

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Pediatric Resuscitation: Before You Hit the ER Doors
Presented by Presented by John Misdary, M.D.
This webinar will be available to view until March 17,
however, registration is still required for CME purposes.

Target Audience: EMS Professionals
Offered FREE of charge with CME.
For details and registration, click here.

Pediatric General Assessment, presented by Dr. Shiva Kalidindi,
will be available until Feb. 28, 2015.



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HAVE YOU REGISTERED YET?

Emergency Medicine Days is FCEP’s premier advocacy event.

  • Identify the key legislative issues affecting emergency medicine
  • Meet with Florida legislators
  • Help provide patients with better access to quality care
  • Earn CME

  • CLICK HERE TO REGISTER!


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    SAVE THE DATE



    WHO
    EMTs | Paramedics | Nurses | Physicians

    WHAT
    5 cutting-edge webinars, hosted through ReadyTalk, specially designed to train and educate EMS professionals on how to identify and respond to the latest infectious diseases. Presented from February to June, 2015.

    WHEN
    The 1st webinar is scheduled for Feb. 24, 2015.
    Stay tuned for registration details.

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    EMERGENCY MEDICINE IN THE NEWS — AROUND FLORIDA


    Hospitals face big cuts in funding fight
    Orlando Sentinel
    More than $142 million in funding could be cut from Central Florida hospitals next year if the state and federal government don't agree to extend a program that pays for the care of low-income and uninsured patients. Statewide, hospitals could lose $2.2 billion if the Low Income Pool program, or LIP, is not extended before it expires June 30, potentially putting a significant hole in the state budget.
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    Florida hospitals serving uninsured to take $1.3B hit
    The Gainesville Sun
    The state is facing a $1.3 billion hole in next year’s health care budget when the federal government stops paying hospitals with a large number of uninsured patients, a practice that was set to end as part of the Medicaid expansion that the Florida Legislature has refused to implement. The federal government’s Medicaid chief said that there would be no more waivers granted to extend the program, known as the low-income pool (LIP), when responding to a question during the Associated Industries of Florida’s Health Care Affordability Summit in Orlando Tuesday, Health News Florida reported.
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    New psychiatric hospital approved
    Health News Florida
    The Florida Agency for Health Care Administration approved a 48-bed expansion for an Central Florida hospital. Central Florida Behavioral Hospital’s $11.8 million expansion will be used for adult psychiatric patients, and brings the hospital’s total bed count to 174. The expansion of the facility located in Orlando near Sea World, would add 37,000 square feet of new construction. Company officials expect the beds to open in January 2017 and will create 70 jobs. It comes at a time when the lack of funding for mental health services in Florida is being questioned.
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    Smoke visible for miles after reported explosion at Florida hospital
    The Huffington Post
    A hospital in South Florida was evacuated on Feb. 13 after a reported explosion. The building where the explosion occurred was under construction and workers were on a lunch break when the fire started, Local 10 reports. The blaze initially began in an electrical room, according to NBC Miami. Officials believe the fire subsequently led to a 100-pound propane tank exploding.
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    FLORIDA CHAPTER COUNCILLOR ALLOCATIONS
    Florida increased membership in 2014 to over 1500 members. ACEP has notified us that 16 Councillors slots have been allocated. Please watch in upcoming ENews for call for 2015 councillors. For your information, a complete list of Councillors allocated for chapters and sections is found here.
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    2015 EDPMA Solutions Summit Agenda Highlights
    EDPMA
    Join us at the Omni Plantation, Amelia Island, Florida, April 26-29, 2015! The Emergency Department Practice Management Association's Solutions Summit is the premier conference for those in the business of emergency medicine.
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    EMERGENCY MEDICINE IN THE NEWS — NATIONAL


    Shared decision-making in chronic care
    Medscape (free login required)
    This qualitative review explores the relevance of integrating shared decision-making to evidence-based practice while examining different models that nurses can use with patients who have chronic conditions. Evidence-based practice is often translated into clinical practice guidelines. These guidelines often focus more on carrying out the guideline and less on the individual patient's values in the decision-making process.
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    Amid measles outbreak, physicians groups urge vaccination
    Associations Now
    While the debate rages on about the benefits and risks of having one’s children vaccinated, the recent measles outbreak has led two physician associations to speak up on the issue. As of Feb. 6, there were 121 confirmed measles cases in 17 states and Washington, D.C., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That total is on pace to surpass the 644 cases in 2014, the largest number since the disease was declared eliminated in the U.S. in 2000. The agency said that the vast majority of this year’s cases began at the Disneyland theme parks in Southern California. CDC said outbreaks of the disease occur when it reaches a community in the U.S. where groups of people are unvaccinated.
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    How to stop the next pandemic
    U.S. News & World Report
    White House Ebola czar Ron Klain made some optimistic comments over the holidays about the world reaching a “pivot point” in dealing with this global health pandemic. But while we have witnessed some progress in Guinea and Liberia, there are still new cases every day. The situation in Sierra Leone has slowed but remains dire, particularly in the west of the country, as noted by the World Health Organization. United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon has said that “Mitigating the consequences of Ebola will demand a coordinated global response comparable to what is being provided to end the outbreak.”
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    Study shows more stroke patients getting clot-buster quickly
    HealthDay News
    More community hospitals are giving a powerful clot-busting medication to stroke victims, improving their chances of survival and recovery, new research shows. These local hospitals are becoming more comfortable using the clot-busting drug tPA (tissue-plasminogen activator) due to a new treatment scheme known as "drip and ship," said study author Kevin Sheth, MD, chief of the neurocritical care and emergency neurology division at Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut.
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    Will the promise of precision medicine live up to the hype?
    FierceHealthcare
    Despite all the optimism surrounding President Barack Obama's Precision Medicine Initiative — including excitement from providers who already use patients' genetic data to treat disease — the ambitious proposal is not without its skeptics. Obama first introduced the initiative in his State of the Union address, saying "I want the country that eliminated polio and mapped the human genome to lead a new era of medicine — one that delivers the right treatment at the right time." He then requested $215 million for various agencies to pursue a wide-reaching effort to use patients' genetic profiles to map out specialized treatments.
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    Inadequate physical activity increase healthcare costs in the US
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    Despite the known health benefits of being physically active, only about half of U.S. adults meet the minimum guidelines for aerobic physical activity. In a recently published study in Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases, CDC and Emory University researchers reported that physically active adults had lower annual direct healthcare expenditures than adults participating in inadequate levels of physical activity. The study estimated that 11.1 percent of total healthcare expenditures were associated with inadequate levels of physical activity. This equates to about $117 billion per year of direct health care expenditures being associated with inadequate levels of physical activity.
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    Hand hygiene increases incidence of dermatitis among healthcare workers
    The Medical News
    A new study from The University of Manchester has revealed that the incidence of dermatitis has increased 4.5 times in healthcare workers following increased hand hygiene as a drive to reduce infections such as MRSA has kicked in. Researchers from the University's Institute of Population Health studied reports voluntarily submitted by dermatologists to a national database which is run by the University (THOR), between 1996 and 2012. Sixty percent of eligible U.K. dermatologists used this database which is designed to report skin problems caused or aggravated by work. They found that out of 7,138 cases of irritant contact dermatitis reported 1,796 were in healthcare workers.
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    No crosswalk from ICD-9, but ICD-10 is on track for October
    By Scott E. Rupp
    The "delay ICD-10" proponents have found themselves another piece of ammunition to use in their war against transitioning from the current ICD-9 coding system. The latest development in the never-ending fight against replacing the decades-old version is a new study from Vanderbilt University that suggests that mapping codes between ICD-9 and ICD-10 could be a problem. New data published in the Journal of the American Informatics Association reviewed 100 patient visits to the Vanderbilt Adult Primary Care Clinic. Visits coded manually with both ICD-9 and ICD-10 did not match when compared with general equivalence mappings and reimbursement mappings.
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    Balance can be an indicator of risk for stroke and cognitive decline
    HealthNewsDigest.com
    Researchers in Japan recently found a correlation between the ability to balance on one leg and the risk for stroke and cognitive decline in a study of over a thousand healthy adults. To assess the risks, the researchers looked for the presence of "microbleeds," which are tiny lesions in the brain that can lead to stroke and cognitive decline over time.
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    Chronic fatigue syndrome gets a new name
    The New York Times
    The Institute of Medicine on Feb. 10 proposed a new name and new diagnostic criteria for the condition that many still call chronic fatigue syndrome. An institute panel recommended that the illness be renamed "systemic exertion intolerance disease." The term reflects what patients, clinicians and researchers all agree is a core symptom: a sustained depletion of energy following minimal activity, called post-exertional malaise.
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    Only 1 in 3 donor hearts are used in the US
    Bloomberg
    Only 1 in 3 donated hearts is accepted for transplant patients in the U.S., and rejection rates vary by region, researchers found, calling for more standardized guidelines to help doctors not waste potentially good organs. Donor heart utilization fell to 32 percent in 2010 from 44 percent in 1995, according to a study published today in the American Journal of Transplantation. The acceptance rate rebounded slightly from a low of 29 percent in 2006, the researchers said.
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    Antibiotic use has more unwanted effects than previously thought
    Medical News Today
    We have known for some time that one of the unwanted side effects of taking antibiotics is their disruption of friendly microbes in the gut. But now a new study that takes a closer look suggests the consequences of long-term antibiotic use could be even more far-reaching than we thought.
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        Reports not good for Florida's 'safety-net' hospitals (Highlands Today)
    Senate Health Panel tries again on telemedicine (Health News Florida)
    When a state blocks Obamacare, ERs close: The lesson of Louisiana (Los Angeles Times)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
     



    FCEP EMnews

    Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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    Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169  
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