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Emergency Medicine Days is FCEP’s premier advocacy event.

  • Identify the key legislative issues affecting emergency medicine
  • Meet with Florida legislators
  • Help provide patients with better access to quality care
  • Earn CME


  • CLICK HERE TO REGISTER!


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    SAVE THE DATE!


    Learn to recognize the signs of this type of modern-day slavery, and have the means to respond

    This FREE, one-day program is designed for the continuum of emergency medicine providers.

    Approximately thirty percent of human trafficking victims will encounter an Emergency Medicine (EM) professional during their time of enslavement, unfortunately none of them are freed as a result of their encounter. Emergency medicine professionals play a key role in recognizing the signs that a patient is being victimized by human trafficking and are afforded a unique window of opportunity by which to offer help. This comprehensive educational program will focus on the pre-hospital and hospital encounters in an effort to elevate the knowledge base of EM professionals, allowing for proper identification and subsequent intervention. Providing EM professionals with the tools to understand the wide-ranging problem of trafficking, including when and how to act, can lead to the freedom of many of those currently enslaved. Learn more.

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    WHO
    EMTs | Paramedics | Nurses | Physicians

    WHAT
    5 cutting-edge webinars, hosted through ReadyTalk,
    specially designed to train and educate EMS professionals
    on how to identify and respond to the latest infectious diseases.
    Presented from February to June, 2015.

    WHEN
    If you weren’t able to attend the live session,
    the recording of the session will be available until March 24, 2015.
    Feel free to review the FAQs on the registration site
    or email cdhountal@emlrc.org with any questions or concerns.
    To register, click here.

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    Pediatric Resuscitation: Before You Hit the ER Doors
    Presented by Presented by John Misdary, M.D.
    This webinar will be available to view until March 17,
    however, registration is still required for CME purposes.

    Target Audience: EMS Professionals
    Offered FREE of charge with CME.
    For details and registration, click here.

    Pediatric General Assessment, presented by Dr. Shiva Kalidindi,
    will be available until Feb. 28, 2015.



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    SAVE THE DATES






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    EMERGENCY MEDICINE IN THE NEWS — AROUND FLORIDA


    FCEP Councilor Positions Available for the Upcoming ACEP Council
    Interested members wishing to be considered as an FCEP Councilor for the ACEP Council are encouraged to submit letter (email) of interest. The council will meet at the ACEP Scientific Assembly in Boston, Oct. 26 – 29, 2015. There are currently 9 two-year slots available.

    Per FCEP Bylaws:
    Candidates must meet the following criteria:
      1. Member of Chapter for at least two years prior to nomination.
      2. Active involvement in Chapter as evidenced by committee membership and/or attendance at
      the meetings of the Board of Directors.
      3. Plans to attend Councilor meetings for two-year
      term. Councilors will be elected for two-year term with term beginning immediately upon
      election.

    Should a Councilor resign or be elected to office that is a designated Councilor, then the remaining Councilors will elect an Alternate Councilor to fill the unexpired term. If there are no Alternate Councilors available to be seated, then the Executive Committee shall have the right to name Alternate Councilors to be seated or designated as Councilors.

    Please email bbrunner@emlrc.org no later than April 15, 2015.

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    FLORIDA CHAPTER COUNCILLOR ALLOCATIONS
    Florida increased membership in 2014 to over 1500 members. ACEP has notified us that 16 Councillors slots have been allocated. Please watch in upcoming ENews for call for 2015 councillors. For your information, a complete list of Councillors allocated for chapters and sections is found here.
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    Florida scrambles to fill Medicaid budget hole after CMS nixes low-income pool
    Modern Healthcare
    The CMS will not renew a Medicaid waiver in Florida expiring at the end of June that provides more than $1 billion a year to help the state's hospitals with uncompensated-care costs for low-income and uninsured patients. That may put additional pressure on Florida Republican leaders to consider expanding Medicaid to low-income adults under the Affordable Care Act.
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    Another Florida healthcare crisis
    Miami Herald (opinion)
    The rejection of federal funds for Medicaid expansion by leaders in Tallahassee was never a smart decision. Now it looks even worse as the feds prepare to shut down a healthcare pipeline that pours about $1.3 billion into a statewide program that aids hospitals that care for Florida’s neediest. Federal subsidies for “safety-net” hospitals — under a program known as LIP, the Low Income Pool — are set to expire at the end of June. LIP mitigates the cost of providing healthcare to the under-insured and uninsured. It’s being eliminated because the Affordable Care Act was supposed to reduce the need for such supplemental funding by increasing the number of Americans with healthcare coverage.
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    2015 EDPMA Solutions Summit Agenda Highlights
    EDPMA
    Join us at the Omni Plantation, Amelia Island, Florida, April 26-29, 2015! The Emergency Department Practice Management Association's Solutions Summit is the premier conference for those in the business of emergency medicine.
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    EMERGENCY MEDICINE IN THE NEWS — NATIONAL


    Johns Hopkins and CDC prepare emergency department staff to care for patients with infectious disease
    News-Medical
    Four Web-based training modules developed by Johns Hopkins Medicine for emergency department personnel who treat patients with infectious diseases are now available on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) YouTube channel. Titled Ebola Preparedness: Emergency Department Guidelines, the learning series prepares health care workers to safely and efficiently identify, triage and briefly manage the care of patients who might have Ebola. In addition, the modules showcase important planning processes, provider-patient communication techniques and cross-discipline teamwork principles that can be used to successfully prepare for emerging infectious diseases.
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    The rise of the specialty emergency department
    Modern Healthcare
    More than 10 percent of Mount Sinai Hospital's 110,000 emergency department visits each year involve patients over age 65. Three years ago, the 1,048-bed New York City hospital — which is participating in a Medicare shared-savings accountable care organization — opened a dedicated geriatric ED designed to help coordinate care for these higher-risk patients. “There's sort of a silver tsunami approaching,” said Dr. Denise Nassisi, director of geriatric emergency medicine at Mount Sinai. “We planned it because we knew that geriatric patients really do require special handling.”
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    Hospitals see alarming increase in suicidal children
    MedPage Today
    Here's a troubling thought: more kids and young adults are intentionally hurting themselves — sometimes lethally. "The biggest news here is that there is a startling jump in the number of kids hospitalized for suicide and self injury between 2006 and 2011," said Celeste Torio, Ph.D., MPH, scientific review officer, Office of Extramural Research Education and Priority Populations (OEREP) at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).
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    CDC sees increase in emergency care, ambulatory EHR adoption
    EHR Intelligence
    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently released a survey that shows an increase in emergency and ambulatory EHR adoption between 2006 to 2011. It was found that, by 2011, 84 percent of hospital emergency departments (EDs) and 76 percent of outpatient departments used an EHR system. In fact, EHR adoption rose from 19 percent in 2007 to 54 percent in 2011 among EDs. Additionally, more outpatient facilities began focusing on Stage 1 Meaningful Use requirements. The trends show a steady rise in the implementation of any EHR system among emergency care facilities across the five-year timeframe.
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    'Superbug' surfaces at UCLA — What you need to know
    By Joan Spitrey
    According to recent reports, UCLA's Ronald Reagan Medical Center in Los Angeles has potentially infected nearly 180 patients with the "superbug" known as carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CRE. UCLA has traced the source of the spread to duodenoscopes that are used for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The outbreak was initially discovered last month, and the hospital immediately began notify patients who had been treated as far back as October to offer them medical tests. At least two deaths have been attributed to the current outbreak.
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    Study: 1 in 5 sore throats tied to potentially dangerous bacteria
    HealthDay News
    A potentially deadly bacteria is responsible for one in five sore throats in young adults, a new study suggests. Patients with this bacteria — Fusobacterium necrophorum — can get negative results on a strep test, but be at risk of an abscess that blocks the airway, researchers report. In this study of young people aged 15 to 30, researchers found that more than 20 percent of the sore throats were caused by F. necrophorum — more than the number caused by group A streptococcal bacteria.
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    Virus that causes chicken pox and shingles linked to giant cell arteritis
    The Medical News
    A new study developed at the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus links the virus that causes chicken pox and shingles to a condition that inflames blood vessels on the temples and scalp in the elderly, called giant cell arteritis. Giant cell arteritis, which can cause blindness or stroke and can be life-threatening, is linked in the study to the varicella zoster virus, of the herpes virus family, which causes chicken pox and may reactivate later in life in the form of shingles, a very painful rash.
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    Clinical diagnostic approach to congenital agenesis of right lung with dextrocardia: A case report with review of literature
    The Clinical Respiratory Journal
    Congenital lung agenesis is extremely rare. Although it is often associated with acute respiratory distress and has a high mortality rate, some individuals may remain asymptomatic throughout their life. A 44-day-old male child with right pulmonary agenesis presented to us with severe respiratory distress. He was misdiagnosed as a case of foreign body bronchus at emergency room according chest X-ray. Right lung agenesis was confirmed by CT scan.
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    FDA issues device safety alert following 'superbug' outbreak
    Reuters
    The complex design of endoscopes that have been linked to a "superbug" outbreak at the UCLA Health System in California may hinder proper cleaning, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned on Feb. 19. The hospital system said seven patients were infected with a potentially deadly, drug-resistant strain of bacteria and that more than 100 may have been exposed to it between October and January. The bug may have contributed to the death of two patients, UCLA said.
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    Measles cases continue to rise across the US
    HealthDay News
    The number of measles cases in the United States has reached 141 patients in 17 states and the District of Columbia, federal health officials reported Feb. 17. The outbreak began at two Disney theme parks in southern California in December, the CDC says, and it's believed that the source of the infection was likely a foreign visitor or a U.S. resident returning from abroad. The majority of people who've gotten measles in the current outbreak were unvaccinated, the agency said.
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    Children with polio-like illness continue to struggle
    USA Today
    VideoBrief At least 112 children in 34 states have developed sudden, severe muscle weakness, officially known as acute flaccid myelitis, since September, according to the CDC. Like polio, the paralysis occurred largely on one side of the body. Only one of the children has completely recovered, according to the CDC. Although two-thirds have improved somewhat, many continue to struggle. The cause of the illness — and how to treat and prevent it — remain unknown.
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    Prescription painkiller abuse: A worst drug overdose epidemic in history
    News-Medical
    The Centers for Disease Control calls prescription painkiller abuse "one of the worst drug overdose epidemics in history." New studies on prescription painkillers show that from 1999 to 2011, the consumption of hydrocodone more than doubled and oxycodone use increased by 500 percent. During that time, opioid pain reliever (OPR) overdose nearly quadrupled. "The rise in opioid consumption has resulted in a doubling in visits to the emergency department for nonmedical OPR use but I also see patients who make errors with medications they are legitimately supposed to be taking," says Megan Rech, emergency medicine pharmacist, Loyola University Health System.
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        Hospitals face big cuts in funding fight (Orlando Sentinel)
    Smoke visible for miles after reported explosion at Florida hospital (The Huffington Post)
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    Antibiotic use has more unwanted effects than previously thought (Medical News Today)
    Hand hygiene increases incidence of dermatitis among healthcare workers (The Medical News)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
     



    FCEP EMnews

    Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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    Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169  
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