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FCEP NEWS





REGISTER TODAY!

Registration for the Annual Meeting of the
Florida College of Emergency Physicians

Symposium by the Sea 2014
is now open!

Location: Boca Raton Resort and Club
Date: August 7-10

Please take a moment to review the conference brochure to learn about the exciting new events planned for this year's Symposium.

Symposium by the Sea 2014 Brochure

More symposium details can be found on the Symposium by the Sea 2014 Registration webpage:

Symposium by the Sea Registration

Don't forget to book your hotel room!

For reservations, call 888-543-1224; mention Symposium by the Sea
to get the $170 group room rate.

or

Reserve with group online

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SAVE THE DATE!
July 17-20, 2014

Register Online Now!
Book Your Hotel Room Now!



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FCEP
May 18-21, 2014 ACEP Leadership and Advocacy Conference
June 10, 2014 FCEP Board Conference Call
July 16, 2014 FCEP Board Conference Call
July 17-20, 2014 ClinCon
Aug. 7-10, 2014 Symposium by the Sea
Aug. 7, 2014 FCEP Board of Directors Meeting
Aug. 7-8, 2014 FCEP Committee Meetings

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EMERGENCY MEDICINE IN THE NEWS


The big sleep: Unlocking the secrets of suspended animation
CNN
Imagine it: you have been rushed into the emergency room and you are dying. Your injuries are too severe for the surgeons to repair in time. Your blood hemorrhages unseen from ruptured vessels. The loss of that blood is starving your organs of vital nutrients and oxygen. You are entering cardiac arrest. But this is not the end.
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US confirms second case of MERS
Reuters
U.S. health officials confirmed the country's second case of MERS, a deadly virus first discovered in the Middle East, and said the patient was in good condition in an Orlando, Florida hospital. The case is the second "imported" instance of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, reaching U.S. soil. The first case was confirmed late last month in Indiana, raising fears about the global spread of the virus that has no treatment and kills about one-third of infected patients.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword(s): Viruses.


Expanding coverage will boost ED profits
Healthcare Finance News
Implementation of the Affordable Care Act is likely to lead to increased profitability for hospital emergency departments, concludes a new study published in the May issue of Health Affairs. Researchers found that in 2009 the estimated hospital revenue from emergency department care exceeded the costs for that care by $6.1 billion, representing a profit margin of 7.8 percent. Hospitals make enough profit on the privately insured ($17 billion) to cover underpayment from all the other pay groups, such as Medicare, Medicaid and the uninsured, according to the study.
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Study: Childrens' concussion symptoms can linger long after injury
HealthDay News
Children who suffer a concussion can have lingering effects long after the physical symptoms fade away, U.S. researchers report. In a study from the emergency medicine division at Boston Children's Hospital, doctors found that, while headache, dizziness and blurry vision can appear right after a concussion, emotional and mental symptoms, such as irritability and frustration, show up much later and stay longer.
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ER's frequent fliers have unmet mental health needs
The Coloradoan
Call them frequent fliers. Or superutilizers. Or loyal customers. In hospitals across the country, they're known to doctors and nurses as the people who come back time and again for care. A very small percentage of patients, they rack up an inordinate share of medical expenses, often preventable. Among Medicaid enrollees, they spend an average of around eight times as much as their peers. And many of them have a mental illness. It makes intuitive sense, and research confirms it: A troubled mind can take a toll on the body, and vice versa. This simple fact is leading medical professionals and health officials to rethink how to curb high costs in the healthcare system. What they have found is that it's impossible to treat the most expensive customers of emergency rooms and other hospital services without addressing mental health.
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EXCLUSIVE CONTENT


Nursing and the critical art of being present
By Keith Carlson
During the celebration of Nurses Week 2014, I have been giving a great deal of thought regarding what it means to be present when engaging in the delivery of nursing care. Having said that, what exactly is presence? And how do we nurses actively cultivate it while performing the tasks associated with our work? While we may frequently say that nursing care is all about the patient, the truth is that your ability to be present is where it all begins. A nurse who is present brings so much more intrinsic value to the act of nursing and patient care, whereas a nurse who is on autopilot may as well be a robot.
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Is overprescribing really to blame for antibiotic resistance?
By Lauren Swan
The World Health Organization recently released a report regarding antimicrobial resistance and how it's being found in every part of the world. According to the WHO, the cause of this resistance is overuse and abuse of antibiotic medications, posing a potential threat for civilization as more diseases become drug resistant. However, antibiotics are only available with a prescription, and it's no secret they have become harder to receive in the past 10 years due to possibilities such as this. Yet more drug-resistant diseases have been popping up — whooping cough, gonorrhea and TB, just to name a few. Is overprescribing really at fault? Or are there other factors to consider?
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The addictive eye drops that kill
By Denise A. Valenti
A new drug in Russia and Italy is called the "seven-monther," because that is how long it takes to kill you. Now this addictive drug is making its way to the United States. The drug is tropicamide, trade name Mydriacyl, which is commonly used in an eye drop preparation for the dilation of the pupils during eye examinations. There is little known about the cognitive effect of tropicamide intravenously, and reports are varied.
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FCEP EMnews

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Lisa Smith, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2644  
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